Tag Archives: David Bowie

Album Cover Art and Artist News Summary for the Month of March, 2017

ALBUM COVER HALL OF FAME’S ALBUM COVER NEWS RECAP FOR THE MONTH OF MARCH, 2017

Greetings once again from Chicagoland. Winter is slowly turning into Spring and, I have to tell you, this past Winter wasn’t anything like the ones I remember as a kid growing up here 50+ years ago. In fact, it was almost like a Portland winter (rain, one big snow, lots of mild days) and it has confused the heck out of me (and the plants and trees and people who shovel snow for a living), but I’ll take it any day over -30 degree wind chills, snow up to here and icy sidewalks. Too bad that we had to ruin the planet to make for a nice winter in Chicago, but that’s another column for another publication…

I’m continuing to work hard on my book and, based on the feedback I’m getting from folks who’ve received some of my “leaks”, it should be something that any fan of album cover art/artists will like. Quite honestly, it’s deciding what to/not to include in this first collection that’s been the toughest part, because I want to share everyone’s stories, but I’m trying to keep the book’s length to less than a thousand pages and published price at less than a million dollars, so some things will have to be reserved for a follow-up effort. More to come, for sure.

In this month’s summary (which, luckily for me, falls on a Friday, allowing me to combine my weekly/monthly posts into one – I’m just a lazy guy), you’ll find more examples of the stories about the talented people working to produce great visuals for clients in the music business. You’ll find that the galleries, publishers, curators, etc. who support and promote these works are continuing to promote these good works and are sharing the fascinating details about what they do with the rest of us. There continues to be a significant number of items about album cover art/artists in daily the news cycle, adding items of interest and fascination to the ongoing stream of articles, interviews, museum and gallery show information you’ll read on a wide range of related topics.

Please share this info with everyone you know who are fans of great album cover-related talent and, of course, your comments and feedback are quite welcome.

1) Upcoming, recently-launched/CuRRENTLY-RUNNING and just-closed show/exhibitions –

a) One of the key events on the calendar of any fan of illustrative art is the The MoCCA Arts Festival in Manhattan, NY. This 2-day multimedia event, taking place on Saturday and Sunday, April 1st and 2nd at the Metropolitan West venue on West 46th Street (with a kick-off event taking place on Friday evening) is billed as “Manhattan’s largest independent comics, cartoon and animation festival”, drawing thousands of attendees each year.

In addition to the 400+ exhibiting artists from disciplines such as comic books, animation, commercial/editorial work and the book publishing world that will have their work on display, there will be artists on-hand – including several award-winning honorees who’ll be holding seminars/lectures and demonstrations – who’ve expanded their portfolios to include work on album covers such as Alexandra Lobo, musician/artist Jeffrey Lewis and “guests of honor” including (among others) Drew Friedman, the comic artist and prolific editorial illustrator who’s also done covers for Michael Nesmith, Mike Bloomfield & Al Kooper and several “best of” compilations, V For Vendetta’s David Lloyd and Becky Cloonan who, in addition to being the first female artist to draw Batman for DC Comics, is the artist responsible for a Gaugin-inspired 2006 album cover for a rap act with one of the best names in the business, The CunnyLinguists.

There will also be film and educational programs that will be taking place during the event, so click on over to the Society of Illustrator’s event page via the link to learn more – https://www.societyillustrators.org/mocca-arts-festival

b) Photographer Brian Griffin has long supplied the world of album art with many of its best-known images, including his work with designer Barney Bubbles and the Stiff Records label and for musical acts such as Kate Bush, Depeche Mode, Echo & The Bunnymen, Joe Jackson, Iggy Pop, R.E.M. and many others. In the late 1970s, Brian’s keen eye and unique approach to framing an image produced both several series of much-lauded photos for editorial and commercial clients and a limited-edition photo book (now out-of-print) with designer Bubbles called © Brian Griffin 1978 and, beginning April 13th at The Society Club’s gallery space in Soho, London, a series of 18 darkroom prints taken from that book will be put on display in an exhibit titled Circa 1978.

According to Mr. Griffin, in thinking back on this work, “the thing about the 1970s is that it was very still. If you look at my images from that time, and from others like my best friend Martin Parr, there’s a remarkable stillness to them. I don’t really know if we were looking forward to anything. But at the same time, there was of all this amazing music and art being made under the surface.” He’s since stated that the book was really a self-portrait of himself at the time, symbolically-represented, so if you’d like to have the opportunity to dig further into the psyche of one of the U.K.’s most-influential and awarded portrait photographers, please follow the link to The Society Club’s info page on the event – http://www.thesocietyclub.com/events-1/2017/3/14/soho-circa-1978-a-exhibition-of-work-by-brian-griffin

Show hours are Monday – Saturday from 11.00AM – 6.00PM (Closed Sundays)

c) On display now through April 23rd at Proud Galleries Camden (U.K.) is a photo show featuring the works of Paul Harries in a 20-year career retrospective exhibition titled Access All Areas: Photographs by Paul Harries. Well-known in hard rock/metal music circles for his portraits of top acts including Metallica, Muse, Nirvana, Ozzy and Slipknot (among many others) and for his many years of editorial photo contributions to Kerrang! magazine, the exhibition showcases Harries’ portfolio that also includes dozens of shots used on records released by Cradle of Filth, Killswitch Engage, Arch Enemy, Napalm Death and the Dropkick Murphys. There are a number of limited-edition prints that are on sale (at very reasonable prices, I might add), so if you’d like to see what’s on hand and learn more about this very talented shooter, please click on over to the Proud Galleries site at https://www.proudonline.co.uk/exhibitions

d) Wednesday April 5th at 1PM EST, photographer and American Crew hair care products founder David Raccuglia leads a lecture at Berklee College in Boston, MA titled “The Style of Elvis: A Talk with David Raccuglia”. Part of a week-long series of events (running April 3rd through the 7th which includes displays, lectures, discussions and film screenings) that have been developed to help showcase the business side of Elvis Presley’s career (all under the moniker “Elvis Legacy Week: Music Makes an Artist, Style Makes an Icon”), David will be highlighting the unique and long-lasting visual and stylistic aspects of Presley. hoping to imbue on these students that they can monetize their own images and, if possible, “create a recognizable brand.”

In these days of having to manage and develop valuable relationships with new and existing fans, who better to base your success story on than the man from Tupelo, MS who, while raised in a shotgun shack built by his father before starting out his career as a musician while still a young teen, grew into one of the most-successful entertainers/entertainment brands in pop music history. Raccuglia, who has helped build the visuals (including album cover shots) for entertainers including, Pete Yorn, Phanton Planet, Otis Taylor and, more recently, Iggy & The Stooges while building his company into an industry leader in salon products, seems quite qualified for the task of guiding young people poised to enter the business world. More on this lecture is available via the link at https://www.berklee.edu/events/panel-style-elvis 

e) Over his 50+ year career in the arts, designer John Van Hamersveld has ingratiated himself to art fans via his notable output in the areas of music (Magical Mystery Tour for The Beatles, Exile on Main Street for the Rolling Stones and Hotter Than Hell for KISS are just a few examples), film (the iconic surf film Endless Summer) and post-punk fashion (stylings for Blondie and post-Sex Pistols John Lydon), it’s only fitting that he be on hand as part of a group of influential local artists being presented under the moniker “California Locos” (and who’ve each contributed greatly to the Los Angeles-area cultural scene) whose works were featured in a “pop up” show that was staged over the weekend beginning March 16th (and running thru March 19th) that coincided with the long-awaited opening of the newest skate park there.

The “California Locos” are Chaz Bojorquez, Dave Tourje, John Van Hamersveld, Norton Wisdom and Gary Wong and, according to a promo by the Manhattan Beach (CA) Art Center, the venue that hosted this show, “together and separately, these forces of artistic nature embody the innovative, lively, and rebellious spirit of Los Angeles. Rather than suggesting a cohesive or coinable L.A aesthetic, California Locos presents a collision of visions – a kaleidoscopic perspective of the urban art experiences through highly individualized and expertly crafted works of art: from loose and spontaneous performance painting, to deliberate psychedelic graphics and painterly street graffiti. What unifies these artists is their shared conviction that being raised in this sprawling metropolis fundamentally and distinctively informs and guides their art.”

Fans had a chance to meet the artists, listen to some live music, tour the art exhibition and take in the cool skate park vibe in a series of events staged throughout the weekend. More info is up on the Manhattan Beach city web site – http://www.citymb.info/city-services/parks-and-recreation/cultural-arts/exhibition/upcoming-exhibitions

Add’l info and photos from the shindig can be found on the event’s Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/events/879707702172085/

f) Both an exhibition and an opportunity to meet some of the music industry’s best-known graphic artists and then buy some of their latest creations, the “Flatstock” shows have always been a great draw and, with the latest one – Flatstock 59 – having taken place recently as part of the uber-popular SXSW show in Austin, TX, I’m sure that the tradition continued in fine style. As you know, many of the artists that work in the album cover art arena also labor to provide their clients with imagery for their live shows, and with gig posters typically available at very-affordable prices, this show has always served as the place where smart collectors go to augment their collections.

This year’s show – organized by the American Poster Institute – ran for three full days beginning March 16th and was available for viewing by all SXSW pass holders inside the Austin Convention Center. More info on the show can be found on their Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/events/686209521550960/?  while more about Flatstock and the American Poster Institute, organizers of the event, can be seen on this site – http://americanposterinstitute.com/flatstock

g) And I thought that I was a hoarder! Turns out that, when you’re in a band for 40 or 50 years, you tend to accumulate a lot of stuff and, when you’re a big-enough act, you get the opportunity to share what you’ve collected with your fans, and charge for the privilege! I’d like to point out two such examples today – one continuing on its world-wide tour and the other launching later this Spring:

– The Rolling Stones’ Exhibitionism tour continues its major city/venue conquest when it closes in NYC on March 12 and then moves its over 18,000 square feet of rare memorabilia to Chicago’s Navy Pier area this coming April. According to the folks staging the display, the show will “immerse visitors into the largest touring exhibition of its kind ever to be staged…core to Chicago’s brand and history is our amazing tradition of music – from the birthplace of the Blues and Jazz to the continued evolution of all forms of music and entertainment today – on our stages, on our festival grounds and in our nightclubs,” said David Whitaker, President & CEO of Choose Chicago. “Having the privilege of hosting The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism gives us a tremendous platform to provide visitors with not only anew reason to visit, but also a compelling opportunity to experience it in the heart of our city at Navy Pier – one of the most successful attractions in the United States.”

The exhibition launched last year at London’s Saatchi Gallery and, after setting attendance records there, moved to the Industria venue in New York City, where it has garnered many positive reviews there as well. After its Chicago run, the show will travel across the globe to Sydney, Australia.

Complete information on the show can be found at http://www.stonesexhibitionism.com/exhibitionism-is-coming-to-chicago/

– London’s Victoria & Albert (V&A) Museum has hosted some stellar rock music-oriented shows within its hallowed halls in the past, the most-recent being the exhibition built around the life and music of the late David Bowie. The positive reviews (and major bump in attendance) the venue received from that show certainly served as the inspiration for the development of the next show slated to open there this May 13th that, based on the advance press info, looks like it’ll be a smash. Working with Pink Floyd alumni Nick Mason, Roger Waters and designer Aubrey Powell (from the famed Hipgnosis design firm), The Pink Floyd Exhibition: Their Mortal Remains will showcase over 350 examples of artwork, stage props, photographs, video and more from the band’s earliest incarnation (including the talented-yet-tortured Syd Barratt) up to their 2014 Endless River release and will include a re-creation of the famed underground club UFO, where Floyd was the “house band” nearly 50 years ago.

DesignWeek’s Tom Banks provides a nice overview of the upcoming show, including comments from all of the players involved in the organizing and staging of it – https://www.designweek.co.uk/issues/13-19-february-2017/va-set-blockbuster-pink-floyd-exhibition/

2) Artist interviews/profile articles –

a) When you’re both a top-tier designer and a huge Pink Floyd fan, I’d assume that when you’re given the opportunity to work with the band and their long-time design guru Aubrey Powell to design the packaging for a huge, multi-volume collection of PF music (“6 Individual Volumes available as Multi-disc Book-bound packages Featuring Rare Tracks, Demos, Interviews, and Film Footage Each ‘Year’ CD, DVD & Blu-Ray package includes Photo Book & Memorabilia”, as described on their product promo site), it becomes an opportunity to really “show your chops”. And as it was an opportunity added on to an original design brief that was limited to designing some type for a re-working of the band’s Animals record, you can also assume that they’d want to rise to the occasion and present the best work possible to this very important client, with the story behind this new work by Pentagram’s Harry Pearce and his team now detailed in TWO new stories that have been posted, the first by Katharine Schwab on Fast Company’s Design site (https://www.fastcodesign.com/3069074/pink-floyd-records-new-identity-was-40-years-in-the-making) with the other by Rachael Steven on the Creative Review site – https://www.creativereview.co.uk/pink-floyd-records-early-years-box-set-hipgnosis/

Released last year on Pink Floyd Records, Pink Floyd: The Early Years documents the band’s early output from 1965-1972. You can review all what’s included in each of the volumes on their site at http://the-early-years.pinkfloyd.com/

b) In this recent NME profile featuring 2X Grammy-nominated designer Mark Farrow of London’s Farrow Design, you’ll get the inside scoop about his latest work for UK hip-hop artist Michael Omari, better known to his fans as “Stormzy”. Teaming up with photographer John Ross, whose portfolio includes album cover images for musical acts including Manic Street Preachers, Pet Shop Boys, Spiritualized, David Gray, Kylie Minogue and DJ Shadow as well as promo imagery for Quentin Tarantino’s film Inglorious Basterds and commercial work for brands including Piaget, Ducati and The Botanist Islay Gin (a personal favorite of yours truly), the pair chose to produce a recreation of DaVinci’s The Last Supper, with a balaclava-clad Stormzy and his compadres stepping in to the roles of Christ and his disciples, for the cover of the young grime sensation’s latest release titled Gang Signs & Prayer (AKA “GSAP”).

Farrow, who has music client credits for work for many of the aforementioned acts as well as others including Burt Bacharach and Snow Patrol, worked with Stormzy and Ross for weeks before they arrived at an approach that would not be seen as a parody of the highly-revered but, rather, as a modern representation of the musician’s faith.

Read more of reporter Jamie Milton’s profile at http://www.nme.com/blogs/how-stormzy-made-gang-signs-prayer-album-cover-1999236

To see more of the work of photographer Ross, click on over to his web site at http://www.johnross.co.uk/  and, to dig into the portfolio of Farrow Design, visit http://www.farrowdesign.com/

c) The April 2017 issue of Juxtapoz Magazine has a profile/interview I think you’ll find interesting with Brooklyn-based artist/musician/collector of all things odd-yet-beautiful-in-their-own-special-way, Joe Coleman, Jr. Interviewed by noted production designer Gregg Gibbs in advance of an upcoming solo art exhibition that launches April 8th at the Nicholas & Lee Begovich Gallery on the campus of Cal State Fullerton (CA) – one that takes visitors back to his early days as a comic book artist and then over several decades to his more-recent work as a fine artist, producing highly-detailed epic-scale works that can often include as much text as imagery.

With a personal collection of macabre artifacts that’s been organized into what’s known as The Odditorium, Coleman also has several album cover credits including work for musical acts such as The Delgados, Damnation and Ambush, along with a late 70s disc by his own band, Steel Tips. He also created promo art for the John McNaughton-directed film Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer that proved to be as controversial as the film’s subject material. This profile will give you a deeper look into what has sculpted Joe’s approach to art-making, including time he spent as a taxi driver in New York City back in the days when it was a tad seedier than visitors will find it these days….https://www.juxtapoz.com/news/magazine/joe-coleman-the-devil-and-design-in-the-details/

Details on the upcoming art show (including the April 8th opening reception) can be found on the gallery’s site at http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/art/galleries/begovich_gallery/begovich_detail-3.php

d) Famed album cover art director Paula Scher is the subject of Episode 6 in the recently-released Netflix series featuring profiles on eight different artists who’ve made names for themselves in all aspects of the graphic arts world. Now available for binge-watching are the eight episodes that make up the first season of Abstract: The Art of Design, with this batch including hour-long portraits of Scher and her compatriots in the design world including notables such as architect Bjarke Ingels, illustrator Christoph Niemann, Nike’s Tinker Hatfield (of Air Jordans fame) and set/stage designer Es Devlin, who counts music industry design consumer Kanye W. amongst her clients.

The New Yorker‘s Rob Walker takes us on a brief tour of the series, produced by former Wired Magazine editor Scott Dadich, and his accompanying commentary makes us think a bit about just how broadly-defined the word “designer” seems these day – the same way that the use of the word “architect” has been expanded beyond its original (perhaps a bit too far, in some cases). Read Rob’s article/intro (“Celebrating Design Without Contending With It”) via the link at http://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/celebrating-design-without-contending-with-it  and, to learn more about the series and watch its trailer, click on over to https://www.netflix.com/title/80057883

e) In case you missed my mid-week post touting my interview with Taschen Publishing’s Julius Wiedemann regarding his take on the roles album cover art serves in the worlds of fine art and pop culture (in support of his latest book, Art Record Covers), I’d invite you to take a moment and link over to the ACHOF site to read it – https://albumcoverhalloffame.wordpress.com/2017/03/08/interview-with-taschens-julius-wiedemann-about-his-newest-book-art-record-covers/

f) The Detroit-based Whign design collective (“a creative team composed of Thinkers, Artists, Progressers and Entrepreneurs, linked with a common purpose, possessing skills and talents that vary depending on the task at hand”), lead by 25-year-old design phenom Antonio “Tony The Whlgn” Robinson, has been responsible for the memorable designs featured  on records and promo materials for music industry clients such as Joey BadA$$’s Pro Era collective, Big K.R.I.T.,  Dej Loaf and the Cinematic Music Group and commercial clients including Mark Ecko Enterprises and KITH NYC.

Andre Ellington recently contributed an article to the Rolling Out entertainment web site in which he interviewed the group’s manager, Allante Steele, about Tony’s background, career and the importance of relationships and networking when it comes to doing business these days – http://rollingout.com/2017/02/21/tony-whlgn-designer-behind-favorite-album-covers/

Based on what we’ve seen so far, this young artist will be impressing us for many years to come.

g) Be on the lookout later today (March 31) for a specially-posted article featuring excerpts from a feature by designer/music journalist Andrew Dineley on the talented French design team of Pierre et Gilles. I’m very pleased to be able to share this with you, so check back soon.

3) Sales/Auctions –

a) As I had reported a couple weeks back, the San Francisco Art Exchange LLC (SFAE) has been selected to offer collectors a chance to own part of what the gallery is calling “the most valuable collection of rock and roll artwork ever to be offered for sale”, that being a group of eleven original paintings by artist Gerald Scarfe that served as the visual backbone for both the film and record album of Pink Floyd’s 1982 epic productions of The Wall.

According to a newer press release I received this week on the topic, “the paintings being offered have been carefully selected by Scarfe as his most important works, and include several of the most famous images in rock history due to their association with The Wall. Among the paintings are the true definitive originals for iconic artworks such as The Scream, Wife With Flaming Hair, Giant Judge and Hammers, The Mother, Education For What? No Jobs!, The Wife’s Shadow, One of The Frightened Ones, The Gross Inflatable Pig, Comfortably Numb, and The Teacher, as well as the massive original storyboard created for the film which incorporates 50 original renderings.”

One of the paintings available for purchase, Giant Judge and Hammers, will be prominently on display in London beginning May 13, 2017 as part of the Victoria & Albert Museum’s eagerly anticipated The Pink Floyd Exhibition: Their Mortal Remains, while a major exhibition will be held in July with Scarfe in attendance at the invitation-only premier to be held at SFAE’s gallery on Geary Street in San Francisco, CA, with more details to be announced soon. Gallery reps have told me that several of the works have already been spoken for, so if you’d like to see what remains and grab a bit of rock ‘n’ roll history to add to your own collection, I’d suggest clicking on over to the gallery’s site at http://www.sfae.com/announcements/2017/the_wall/index.html

b) The Heritage Auction house hosted another Entertainment & Music Memorabilia auction in mid-March in Dallas, TX that had several album art-based offerings should have been of interest to collectors. While autographed record albums aren’t usually the focus of my reporting, the variety of signed covers – along with other items such as promo displays, original tour art illustrations and the like – being offered was such that I thought I’d pass the info on…

Included in the auction were signed record cover presentations from musical acts such as Aerosmith, Eurythmics, The Police, The Beatles, Def Leppard and many others. Online bidding started at 12:00PM Central Time, Saturday, March 18, 2017, while Live Proxy bidding on Heritage Live started 24 hours before the live session and continued through the session’s end.

Here’s a link to the auction’s page on the Heritage site –

https://entertainment.ha.com/c/search-results.zx?N=2156+4294944953+794+793+792&Ntk=SI_Titles-Desc&Nty=1&Ntt=cover&limitTo=4294944953&ic4=KeywordSearch-A-Y-071316

UPDATE – I checked back after the auction to see what was sold, and it looks as though some items did quite well for their previous owners, while others were had at less-than-expected prices. For example, an autographed photo of Michael Jackson taken during the cover shoot for Bad sold for $4750 (it had a starting bid of $500), and a signed Bad LP sold for $1500. A cardboard store display for the Rolling Stones’ Some Girls – featuring a design by Peter Corriston, who’d go on to design the band’s next 3 covers, along with the eye-catching Illustrations of Hubert Kretzschmar – sold for $3750 and a fully-autographed copy of Regatta de Blanc from the Police was picked up for $425, while on the other end of the spectrum, autographed copies of Touch by Eurythmics, Whiplash Smile by Billy Idol and Love Bites by Judas Priest (delivered on a very colorful picture disc, to boot) sold for $137.50, $94 and $79 respectively, showing collectors that bargains may still be had in these big-name auctions!

c) Alisdair and Mike at Visual Gallery are having a sale featuring some special pricing on a nice selection of album cover art prints including AC/DC’s Back In Black, John Lennon’s Walls & Bridges, several different Rolling Stones cover prints (inc. Sticky Fingers, Exile On Main Street and Some Girls) and a print of the gatefold cover for The Who’s Tommy (with art by Mike McInnerney) that has been autographed by lead singer Roger Daltry. You can take a look at these and some of the other sales items they have available via this link – http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1101302370472&ca=a9df76cc-e19d-494a-b06f-728e5f743f93

d) On March 11th, the Potter & Potter Auction House in Chicago staged a Movie & Music Memorabilia Auction that included a couple of items that fans of album art should have been of interest to collectors. The first item is a limited-edition lithograph print of the cover art for Billy Joel’s 1993 record River of Dreams (which boasts a cover painting by then-wife Christie Brinkley) that’s been autographed by the Piano Man himself – http://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/billy-joel-autographed-river-of-dreams-lithograph-608-c-64f47b2909

The print had a pre-auction estimate of anywhere from $150 – $300, but sold to a lucky collector who presented  a $200 high bid. I’d expected this to sell for more than the asking price, but then, what do I know?.

Another item I’d highlighted – a purple hooded cape that the talented and mysterious singer Stevie Nicks wore to her photo shoot with Herb Worthington for the cover image for her 1983 release The Wild Heart, was up for sale to those  willing to add a significant charge to your credit card account this month. This bit of rock & roll history had a pre-auction estimated value of $1000 – $2000, with current bidding at $600 when I’d first written about it and which ultimately sold for $1000.

http://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/stevie-nicks-cape-worn-for-wild-hearts-album-ar-533-c-c85461a9ac

I’m certain that whoever purchased this cape is bound to show up to an event with this on, with fans in the know either Standing Back (or would they Run To You)?

4) New Print/Book Publishing –

a) Friend of the ACHOF Andrew Dineley (of Liverpool’s SoftOctopus Design Studio) is now writing a new column for a new print/digital publication – an offshoot of the popular Classic Pop magazine) that’s targeted at the growing base of vinyl record fans (and, I can only assume, fans of LP and 7″-sized record artwork and packaging). About ready to release its second issue in the UK, Long Live Vinyl magazine will be home to Andrew’s regular contributions about “collecting and fandom” under the banner “A Few of my Favourite Things”. The pub’s first issue included his article about a “super fan of Prince” and his personal memorabilia collection, along with a nice feature on famed album artist Roger Dean. Andrew’s second article – to be included in the upcoming issue – will be quite personal as it is built around his own personal collection of all things Pet Shop Boys.

If you’d like to learn more about this new publication, click on over to the publisher’s page at  http://anthem-publishing.com/longlivevinyl

Here is a link to a subscription page for UK customers – https://anthem.subscribeonline.co.uk/vinyl

and for folks in the US and Canada, here’s a link to their North American distribution partner’s site – http://www.imsnews.com/home.php?page=magPage&pubid=10314

Those on Facebook can stay updated via their news stream – https://www.facebook.com/longlivevinyl

Update – The magazine has launched its own web site, which can now be visited and its news stories explored via the link – http://www.longlivevinyl.net/category/news/

b) While I’d previously told you (see Section 5, item D, below) about the upcoming series of postage stamps created to honor the memory of the late, great David Bowie, the folks at Goldmine Magazine recently pointed me to a company called Buckingham Covers that provides collectors with “something special” – in this case, a series of limited-edition, framed art pieces built around these stamps. For example, they’re promoting an item called the “Limited Edition David Bowie Vinyl Art Framed with UK First Day Cover” (priced from £101.06) that puts six of the new stamps featuring the following album covers: Hunky Dory (1971); Aladdin Sane (1973); Heroes (1977); Let’s Dance (1983); Earthling (1997) and 2016’s Blackstar and a Heddon Street postmark (14th March, 2017) on top of a photo taken at a live concert. Topping this off is a work of vinyl art, cut with a water jet, done in the shape of Bowie’s Aladdin Sane

Other items in the collection include two more first day cover sets, so if you’d like to grab something a little different for yourself or the David Bowie fans in your life, click on over to the Buckingham Covers site to view what’s available…https://buckinghamcovers.com/goldmine?

c) Heralded designer Aubrey Powell teased us all several years ago with a book about some of the work done by the much-lauded design group called Hipgnosis when he authored the 2014 tome titled Hipgnosis Portraits (which included a nice forward by Robert Plant) but, hey folks, it’s 2017 and now we want it all and Mr. Powell and the folks at the Thames & Hudson publishing house will be fulfilling that request next month when they release Album.Cover.Art, a collection that includes all 377 record covers the group produced throughout its entire history. With a portfolio that begins in 1967 with work for their chums Pink Floyd through instantly-recognizable covers for Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Peter Gabriel, Genesis, 10ccs and many others, the book (with a foreword by the aforementioned Mr. Gabriel) is an instant classic. Due to be published on April 13th, pre-orders are now being accepted at your favorite booksellers and, if you’d like to read a short preview article on the topic, Anton Spice has provided such a thing on The Vinyl Factory’s site – http://thevinylfactory.com/news/vinyl-album-cover-art-hipgnosis-book/

d) Nearly every “best album cover” list you read has the cover for The Beatles’ Pepper’s at or near the top of it, and with music fans celebrating the 50th anniversary of the record’s fall from Heaven onto our turntables later this Spring, I was happy to receive notice from author Bill DeMain about his collaboration with famed artist Mike McInnerney and writer Gillian G. Gaar which has resulted in a new book titled Sgt Pepper at 50: The Mood, The Look, The Sound, The Legacy Of The Beatles’ Great Masterpiece that will bring all of the unique aspects of the album’s conception and production to light for us.

DeMain, whose contributions to publications such as MOJO, Classic Rock, Mental Floss and Performing Songwriter, also leads visitors to Nashville, TN on the top-rated walking tour of this music-centric town – “Walkin’ Nashville”, while McInnerney, the former art editor for Britain’s International Times and the painter of the image used on the gatefold cover of The Who’s Tommy, received an Individual Achievement Award for that work in 2012 from the Album Cover Hall of Fame . Set for release on June 1st (the date of the record’s release in 1967), the 176-page full-color book (with over 225 illustrations) can be pre-ordered now at your favorite bookseller.

https://www.sterlingpublishing.com/9781454923787/?category=

5) Other articles of interest –

a) Like anyone who was an avid reader of Rolling Stone Magazine in the 1970s and early 1980s, I was always more-than-impressed by the wonderful portraits of celebs from all walks of life that were included, with most of them shot by the mag’s top photographer, Annie Leibovitz. During that time (and continuing on until this day), she also fed album cover fans with a steady stream of memorable images, including cover shots for acts such as The Band, Boz Scaggs and Cyndi Lauper, and so it was with great interest that I read this recent Artnet.com article (https://news.artnet.com/art-world/annie-leibovitz-archive-luma-foundation-890540?) by Caroline Elbaor about an archive of over 8,000 photographs that were donated to Switzerland’s LUMA Foundation and which selections of will soon be put on display in a new show at the group’s Frank Gehry-designed digs in Arles, France (the Grand Hall in the Parc des Ateliers) called “Annie Leibovitz Archive Project #1: The Early Years”.

Opening on May 27th, the exhibition will, according to the article, “focus on the photographer’s work between 1968 and 1983 and is intended as the first of several projects dedicated to Leibovitz’s career-beginnings. The show will also mark the first time that the archives become available to the public.” The Foundation declared that the show is “Intended as the first of several major projects dedicated to the study and reinterpretation of the artist’s living archives” and “traces her development as a young artist, and follows her successes in the 1970s as she documented the culture that defined this pivotal era.”

The show will be on display until the 24th of September, with more info available on their web site at http://www.luma-arles.org/programme/#annieleibovitzarchiveproject#1

b) The Herb Ritts Foundation estimates that, during the photographer’s brief-but-influential career (he died in 2002 at the age of 50), Ritts shot over 2 MILLION rolls of film, out of which scores of memorable images, including album cover photos for clients such as Madonna, Olivia Newton-John, Billy Idol, Warren Zevon and many, many others. Another of his famous subjects was Elton John who, readers of this news feed know, is quite the art collector himself and who, during the many years of their friendship and working relationship, added a number of Ritts’ fine art prints to his personal collection.

On April 6th, as part of a fund-raising effort for Sir Elton’s Elton John AIDS Foundation, one of the photographer’s better-known shots – Backflip, Paradise Cove, 1987 – will be included in an auction held in NYC by Christie’s. This particular image is made even more valuable as it was one that Ritts hung in his own home, and so the charity will certainly benefit nicely from this sale, with a pre-auction estimate set at $40,000 – $60,000. As part of the promotion of this event, the auction house has posted an article on the item that also includes a 4-minute video about the photographer that fans will certainly enjoy –

http://www.christies.com/features/Inside-the-archives-of-photographer-Herb-Ritts-8170-3.aspx

c) Ken Robbins left his job as an editor for the Doubleday publishing house in New York City in the early 1970s and moved out to the East End of Long Island – better-known as The Hamptons – to live a quieter life there. He and his wife first opened up a small movie theater and then began photographing the local landscape, with his pictures soon becoming as much-appreciated as his wit and generosity. Expanding his subject material to create a greater range of still life photos, his work would go on to be used in many books, magazines and album covers, where his credits include work for Miles Davis (Circle In The Round), John Hammond (Nobody But You) and several designs and photos for Aretha Franklin.

As news sometimes doesn’t get to me that quickly, I have the sad task of reporting that Ken Robbins died 2 weeks ago at his home in Springs, NY at the age of 71. I’d seen his work several times in galleries, as illustrations in local papers and at the Hecksher Museum in Huntington (where I lived at the time)  and also remember some of his beautifully-illustrated educational kids books. Truly someone who used his talents to make broad swaths of people happy, it’s sad to see him gone so young.

Here’s Ken’s obit in the local East Hampton Star paper – http://easthamptonstar.com/Obituaries/2017323/Ken-Robbins-Noted-Photographer

d) Writing for Design Week (UK), Tom Banks talks to the talented folks who helped design and develop the new series of Royal Mail postage stamps based on the career of the late David Bowie. The latest in the organization’s Classic Album Art series (now in its 7th year), the stamps are sold alongside a collection of ancillary items including specially-curated “presentation packs”, a series of art prints and other collectibles created by the Supple Studio in Bath, UK. , whose other work for their Royal Mail clients includes several “year packs”, “collector’s packs”, commemorative designs for the Queen’s 90th birthday and products based on the Adam Hargreaves-authored “ Men & Little Miss” book series.

In addition to the album cover-based stamps, there’s an entire group of items that showcase Bowie’s time spent in Berlin, Germany (1976-78) rightly-titled David Bowie: The Berlin Years.

https://www.designweek.co.uk/issues/13-19-march-2017/royal-mails-david-bowie-stamps-designed/

See more of Supple Studio’s work, along with a nicely-illustrated tour of their Bowie-related output, on their site a http://supplestudio.com/work/david-bowie

Finally, as if Bowie’s fame and influence were not enough to entice collectors, a rather-unique stunt was launched – and I do me “launched” – that took 52 sets of the new stamps into space via weather balloon. The balloon rose to over 110,000 feet before trackers lost contact with the craft, but if you go to the project’s site at http://www.royalmail.com/stampstoearth  you’ll be able to watch a 20-minute video shot by a camera on the balloon before it finally tumbled to the ground. Where did “The Stamps That Fell To Earth” fall? If you can guess the answer sometime between now and March 26th, you could win one of the high-flying stamp sets for your very own. Grab your compass and trident and take your best guess…

e) The art historian behind the Art Record Covers book previously discussed on this site – Francesco Spampinato – has grabbed 13 of the covers he and Julius W. have included in the book and provided some anecdotes on each in an article recently published on the Creative Review web site – https://www.creativereview.co.uk/art-record-covers-10-great-sleeves-visual-artists/

As part of my own work history included some years in the music television business, I was pleasantly surprised to see one of the covers that has always reminded me of the fun some musical acts have while creating the promo packaging and videos they do for their recordings – this one being the very funny-yet-disturbing cover derived from the identity-bending music video (featuring a stretch limo that will remind movie fans of the opening scene from Spaceballs) crafted by British video pro Chris Cunningham for Irish electronic act Aphex Twin’s 1999 release Windowlicker.

For a quick bit of entertainment, Cunningham has one of the more-intriguing web site home pages you’ll find, too – certainly a test for your video card – http://chriscunninghamstudio.com/

f) The people of the Brixton neighborhood in London, U.K., have always been proud of their local-boy-done-good, the late rocker David Bowie, but now that he’s gone, they’ve decided to work on a more-permanent way to honor his legacy. Launched in late February, there’s a crowd-funding effort to build a Aladdin Sane-influenced lightning bolt sculpture – tentatively-titled Ziggy Zap – that would stand almost 30 feet tall, with comps supplied by the This Ain’t Rock ‘n’ Roll design team (Jon Daniel and Daniel Fisher) – the same folks who created the artwork for the specially-produced £10 note circulated locally beginning in 2011 that bears Brian Duffy’s famous Aladdin Sane cover photo on the front of that currency.

Creative Review’s Mark Sinclair posted an article recently that provides us with the background on this project – https://www.creativereview.co.uk/david-bowie-memorial-project-launched/

As of this date, the organizers have earned about £50,000 of the £990,000 they’ve determined they need. With only 17 days left to the campaign, it’s looking as though the area near the local Underground station will have to be happy with the large-scale mural that was installed a few years back, but perhaps some well-heeled Bowie fans will come in soon to save the day. You can contribute to the cause via the link – http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/bowie

UPDATE – The project did not raise the needed funds so, sadly, the initial project scope will have to be revisited. Nonetheless, the organizers are undaunted and, according to their project funding site, ” we have no plans to go away. We are still determined to celebrate David Bowie, in Brixton, with a challenging and appropriate piece of public art.  We’re just going to have to approach the fundraising in a different way…Along the way, we’ve learned a hell of a lot. And we’ll be able to plough that learning back into the project, and return with a ZiggyZag #2 that’s even better (and hopefully a bit cheaper).” With over 700 pledges made from fans all over the world, I’ll be sure to follow up on this as more information becomes available.

g) Judas Priest album art fans who clicked on over to the Goldmine Magazine web site before March 15th had the chance to enter to win a limited-edition, autographed litho print of the band’s Turbo 30 record cover. Fans will recall the original Doug Johnson design featured on the band’s original 1986 release Turbo (featuring fan favorite tune “Turbo Lover”) and will really be impressed with the sound of this newly-remastered album, so while you might be a little too late for this particular contest, I’d invite you to sign up to get Goldmine‘s e-newsletter, where you’ll greatly improve both your knowledge of all things classic vinyl and get advanced notice about future contest opportunities. If you’d like to see what you missed, click on over when you get the chance – http://www.goldminemag.com/features/judas-priest-turbo-autographed-lithograph-giveaway?#/

SPECIAL NOTE IN SUPPORT OF THE ARTS – I have always worked to make sure that my reporting was focused on the facts and not so much an expression of my own tastes, keeping my editorial comments mostly of the humorous variety. With today’s news regarding the new Administration’s proposed gutting of Arts and Humanities program funding from the federal budget, I find it necessary to appeal to everyone who understands the importance of these programs to both a well-rounded education for our kids and the livelihoods of those who use government grants to further their efforts to produce great art, music and writing for all of us and ask you to make sure to contact your local/state/federal representatives to implore them to maintain these investments in our country’s future.

Unless, of course, the plan is to hire all of these artists to paint the border wall and have musicians and poets perform on stages set up along the way but, somehow, I don’t think so…

To read more about what’s been proposed and how it will affect the targeted programs and the products they produce, click over to writer Caroline Elbaor’s recap on the Artnet site – https://news.artnet.com/art-world/trump-proposes-eliminating-national-endowment-arts-893744

That’s all for now – look for updates every week (typically, on a Friday) on our news feed – https://www.facebook.com/AlbumCoverHallOfFame – we’ll be back early next month with another summary for you.

All text Copyright 2017 Mike Goldstein and AlbumCoverHallofFame.com – All Rights Reserved. All of trade names mentioned in these summaries are the properties of their respective owners and are used for reference only.

Album Cover Art and Artist News Summary for the month of November, 2016

AlbumCoverHallofFame.com News Logo

ALBUM COVER HALL OF FAME’S ALBUM COVER NEWS RECAP FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER, 2016

 

By Mike Goldstein, Curator/Editor, AlbumCoverHallofFame.com

It’s early December, 2016, and WOW! has a lot happened since we last communicated. Of course, the results of the U.S. elections early in the month have either demoralized or energized half the population here, with only the news of the Chicago Cubs breaking their 108-year World Series drought bringing everyone together in peace and harmony, if only for a short while…With all of the uncertainty remaining as to what’s in store for us here, you’d think that there’d have been a brief slow-down in the output of news relating to the art and music scenes but, no, creative people continue to do what comes naturally and, therefore, other people with related businesses and interests (galleries, publishers, collectors, etc.) continue to do what they do to share what they do with the rest of us. As you’ll find in this most-recent summary of news from the world of album cover artists and the wonderful products they’re creating for us fans and collectors of the genre, I believe that we’ll all find enough inspiration to see us through whatever comes our way.

This month’s summary, which includes the results of both our own activities here at the ACHOF and those of other experts in the world of music-related design, art and photography, will still provide you with sufficient proof that the people that make our favorite album imagery are working hard to contribute quite regularly to the news cycle, adding items of interest and fascination to the ongoing stream of articles, interviews, museum and gallery show information and the like on a wide range of related topics. Enjoy the read and let me know if you have any questions or comments:

Special Note – In case you missed the mid-November announcement of the people who were inducted into the Album Cover Hall of Fame’s Class of 2016, you can click on over to the special intro page on the ACHOF site where you’ll find the details. This year’s list of inductees in each of the six major categories will impress you with their range of talents and depth and breadth of their respective portfolios, so why not take a moment to review the details at https://albumcoverhalloffame.wordpress.com/achof-class-of-2016-inductee-intro-page/

Very exciting to see names such as Roberta Bayley, Brian Griffin, Dave McKean, Stan Evenson, Paul Whitehead, Laura Lipuma-Nash, Jeri & John Heiden, Vaughan Oliver and Roland Young included in this year’s list, but each inductee’s impressive list of accomplishments has served to entertain and impress us all, so let’s give them all a hand and kudos for jobs well done.

Please share this info with everyone you know who might be a fan of great album cover art and, of course, your comments and feedback are quite welcome.

Once again, congratulations to all of this year’s inductees, and thanks for the contributions you’ve made to the careers of many of the music industry’s best-known and admired musical acts (and their fans, too).

1) Upcoming, recently-launched, CURRENTLY-RUNNING and just-closed show/exhibitions –

a) Not exactly sure if this counts as an “exhibition” in the normal sense of the word…no, I have to say that it is not “normal”, but it will certainly be an exhibition, and a very punk one at that. On Saturday, November 26th, Joseph Corre, the son of two punk-era icons – designer Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm McLaren, the creator/manager of the Sex Pistols and himself the man behind the Agent Provocateur lingerie line – celebrated the 40th anniversary of the release of the Pistol’s record “Anarchy In The U.K.” by setting fire to a collection of punk-era memorabilia worth an estimated £5 million ($6.2 million) somewhere in Camden, U.K. and invites other like-minded individuals to add their trinkets to the bonfire.

Corre believes that this was the best way to draw attention to the degree that Britain has commercialized what was supposed to be the most anti-commercial movement, particularly as the country has spent all of 2016 staging some very commercial (and government-sponsored) celebrations of “the birth of punk’s” 40th anniversary. Whether you agree or disagree with the degree and style being put on display by this protest, you must admit that it serves as a wake-up call to those of us overtaken by complacency lately. As you’ll read in Hili Perlson’s article on the Artnet.com site – https://news.artnet.com/people/punk-memorabilia-to-burn-450458?

Joseph believes that “the most dangerous thing is that they have stopped fighting for what they believe in. They have given up the chase. We need to explode all the shit once more.”

UPDATE – To bring new meaning to the Holiday tradition of roasting things on open fires, punk scion/fashion industry heavyweight Joe Corre kept true to his word and, this past Saturday, set ablaze a valuable collection of punk memorabilia to protest the over-commercialization of all things and punk things in particular (“Come celebrate Punk’s 40th Anniversary”, the headlines read). In this just-posted BBC video of the event (held, quite appropriately, on a barge in the Thames River, ala a stunt staged by the Sex Pistols 40 years ago), you’ll watch as Corre briefly introduces the stunt and then uses a flaming torch to set ablaze items including clothing, posters, etc.. “Punk was never meant to be nostalgic”, he stated. No punks were harmed in the making of this video.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-38120496

b) The Albany Institute of History & Art recently launched an exhibition featuring the work of rock photographer Patrick Harbron that will be of great interest to fans of classic rock imagery. The show, titled “Rock & Roll Icons: Photographs by Patrick Harbron” (and runs through February12, 2017) is built around the portfolio of the photo-journalist and portrait artist who has contributed his talents to album packages for acts including Black Sabbath, George Carlin, Bruce Cockburn, The Nylons, Rush, Triumph and everyone’s favorite Canadian talk show hosts, Bob & Doug McKenzie (The Great White North– “Take Off, You Hosers!”). In addition to a fine selection of photos, the show adds other items from Harbron’s personal memorabilia collection, including posters, magazines and tour souvenirs.

Read more about the show and the talent behind it via Michael Hallisey’s recent article on the topic on the web site of local (Albany, NY-area) news service “The Spotlight” – http://www.spotlightnews.com/thespot/2016/11/10/harbron-photos-of-rock-icons-at-the-albany-institute-of-history-art/ and then on the Gallery’s own site – http://www.albanyinstitute.org/rock-and-roll-icons.html

c) In November, the Tulla Booth Gallery in Sag Harbor (Long Island), NY gave its customers a chance to see photographer Eric Meola’s display of a collection of previously-unseen photos taken during the June, 1975 shoot for one of Bruce Springsteen’s best-known album cover images – that for his mega-hit record Born To Run. Meola, who went on to become one of the world’s busiest shooters, has spent his time more-recently travelling around the country to photograph tornados (I guess that standing next to the late Clarence Clemons while he played his sax wasn’t loud enough for him!) and other scenes off the beaten path, but it was his photos of the emerging superstar taken to help package his then Magnum Opus that established the Long Island, NY resident as one of rock’s go-to photographers.

The Gallery in Sag Harbor was not too far from the place where Eric and his family have called their home for many years. An intro article about the show and the man whose photos are featured in this exhibition can be found on the Dan’s Papers site – http://www.danspapers.com/2016/11/eric-meolas-born-to-run-shares-unseen-bruce-springsteen-photographs/

More info about the show and the gallery can be found on their site at http://www.tullaboothgallery.com/index.shtml

d) Blondie founder/photographer Chris Stein’s photo show at the Gallerie Agnes MonPlaisir in Paris (“Me, Blondie and the Advent of Punk”) closed after the weekend of November 13th, but if you’re in the area and are a fan of Stein’s band, his band mates (inc. singer Debbie Harry) and his amazing photos of other mega-stars of the era – Joan Jett, Iggy Pop, the Ramones, Andy Warhol and others, shot in classic venues including CBGBs and Warhol’s Factory in NYC or the Beverly Hills Hotel out West, be sure take a look a pix from the event on the gallery’s site – http://www.agnesmonplaisir.com/en/9-cs.html

e) In support of a new show now on display at the Society of Illustrators’ Gallery in NYC called “Drawn To The Music” – in which a slate of illustrators have created unique works of art based on lines from their favorite songs – the gallery held an Opening Reception during which visitors had the chance to see these wonderful examples of the way “music influences art influences music”. Illustrators have always played an important part in the world of music product packaging and promotion – from mega-works such as Klaus Voorman’s cover for Revolverfor The Beatles, Lee Conklin’s trick-of-the-eye “Lion” pen drawing found on Santana’s debut record and Al Hirschfeld’s one-of-a-kind portraits found on Aerosmith’s Draw The Lineto the lettering and background images found on countless other albums – so it’s fascinating to see how today’s illustrators use their talents to visualize  famous song lyrics…Society of Illustrators “Drawn To The Music” show – https://www.societyillustrators.org/exhibits/drawn-music

f) Ron English “Popaganda” pop-up art show at The Wood Shoppe ” (a “‘bodega’ of cannabis-themed pop art and images”) was on display in NYC through November 8th – see interview in Section 2, below, to read more about this influential and prolific artist…

2) Artist interviews/profile articles –

a) Rarely do you get a chance to see an album cover as it is being made and, in this amazing example of having a video camera on hand in the right place at the right time, fans of the band Radiohead can actually watch long-time band album artist Stanley Donwood paint the cover while the band is recording the record in the studio next door! Clicking on over to Gil Kaufman’s recent article on the comsite, you’ll be able to launch a video, taken late last year, where you can act as a “fly on the wall” in Donwood’s studio (in France) as he works while you hear singer Thom Yorke recording vocals to a track on their most-recent record – A Moon Shaped Pool– in the background.

I often ask album artists if they’re given the chance to hear the music before they begin work on a project (usually “yes”, often “no”) but here, in this case, inspiration comes right through the walls!

http://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/rock/7580291/radiohead-artist-stanley-donwood-a-moon-shaped-pool-video

b) 36 years ago (1980), U2 released their first record, simply titled Boy. In Europe, the record featured the photo of a very young, shirtless boy on the cover and, although the boy in question turned out to be the young son of one of Bono’s friends, record distributors in more-puritanical countries (yes, that means the U.S.) were “unhappy” with the image and demanded an alternative, which was put together by photographer/designer Sandy Porter and used up until 2008, when re-issues were able to use the original photo.

In this recent article by U2Songs.com contributors Aaron J. Sams and Don Morgan, you’ll read an interview they did with Porter about that project and how he created the new image as one of the first projects he worked on after his 1979 graduation from London’s Royal College of Art (rather an auspicious start to a career, wouldn’t you say?). Working with little time, no budget and not much in terms of source materials (sounds familiar, doesn’t it, fellow producers?), Porter and Island Records designer Bruno Tiley collaborated on what would turn out to be an important early image for a band set on super-stardom. What you’ll like about this article is that Porter dug into his archives to provide several fascinating images of works-in-progress and some of the alternative designs that were proposed prior to the final one being selected – fascinating, I think you’ll agree – http://www.u2songs.com/news/coverboy

c) New to the Modern Vinyl site and podcast is a feature built around album cover artist interviews conducted by artist Michael Paul Escanuelas titled “Missing Artwork”. The first interview posted is with artist Dewey Saunders about the very psychedelic cover image he created for Oxnard, CA-based recording artist Anderson.Paak’s 2016 release titled Malibu. Saunders has created several other trippy collages for other Paak records and has produced nice work for clients such as Traffic Skateboards and the Red Bull Music Academy, so this interview provides fans of album art/illustration a unique peek behind the scenes of an artist hard at work for his clients and their fans – http://modern-vinyl.com/2016/11/01/missing-artwork-s01e01-dewey-saunders-anderson-paak/

Interviewer Escanuelas’ own site shows a nice music packaging portfolio as well – http://cargocollective.com/michaelpaul

d) Boy, does this man know his pixels! Artist David Larkham, long an icon to fans of album cover artwork due to his memorable work for Elton John, Three Dog Night, Leo Sayer, Ambrosia and many others, continues to impress us with his newer works, such as the fine art portraits he’s created using a fascinating pixel-based technique he’s perfected. David just sent me a link to a video he’s created that shows him producing his latest work, a portrait that introduces us to the winner of the recent presidential election in the U.S. (well, at least in a parallel universe, thus giving us the title for the 3-minute “making of” film he’s produced that features the music of Late Show with Steven Colbert‘s house band, Jon Batiste & Stay Human).

Thanks, David, for sharing this and for your continued great work – https://youtu.be/F98rYAaUZ9A

e) When he’s not conducting and performing as part of the ensemble that provides the music for the Broadway production of the Disney musical “Aladdin“, Andy Grobengieser uses his artistic talents in a rather unusual -yet-impressive fashion – he creates Lego versions of some of his favorite album covers, musical acts, classic rock instrumentation and other Broadway productions. He’s rightly proud of his work and, as you’ll read in Stan Polanski’s article for the Effingham (IL) Daily Newsservice, he’s hoping that large numbers (at least 10,000) of people like his work enough to vote on the Lego site so that the company will consider adding Andy’s creations to their line of available project kits.

You’ll get a kick out of his cover recreations for bands including Boston, ELO and Journey (I was particularly fond of his Jeff Lynne Lego figure) along with his takes on electronic instruments (including the Moog synthesizer) and everyone’s favorite album art prism image. Read the EDN article first at http://www.effinghamdailynews.com/news/local_news/altamont-native-proves-legos-aren-t-just-for-kids/article_5010419f-e163-5df1-ba37-2fa78a3a2cc1.html and then click on over to Andy’s site at http://www.grobiebrix.com/ to see his full line of creations.

f) Over on the Thump/Vice site, writer Ali Gitlow treats us to profiles of ten graphic designers who have excelled at creating visuals for many of today’s most-successful electronic music artists – people who are often not well-represented in the mainstream music press but who have legions of fans in clubs all over the world. While early electronic musicians – Kraftwerk, Vangelis, Synergy and others – used album cover imagery to raise the visibility of their recorded music products in the days before the Internet, today’s designers are tasked with creating graphics for their clients’ many touch points with their fans – set designs, web sites, merchandise, videos and more – and so to learn more about these talented (young) creatives and see their work is quite the treat.

You’ll meet designers based in the U.S., Mexico, the U.K., Europe and Russia, each with their own unique take on how best to create just the right imagery for their popular clientele – https://thump.vice.com/en_us/article/graphic-designers-electronic-music-list

g) I had the opportunity last year to see a small gallery show that featured photographer Jerry Uelsmann’s fascinating (and, sometimes, disturbing) photo-montages, so when I saw this recent article on the Music Universe site about the composition that rocker Bon Jovi has included on the cover of their most-recent record – This House Is Not For Sale– I knew that I had to share it with you. Considered one of the pioneers in digital photo manipulation, Uelsmann was a professor at the University of Florida and has displayed his works in exhibitions and galleries all over the world. In addition, over 20 books have been published that include his work, so it is with particular pride that Floridian and Music Universewriter Buddy Iahn lauds the artist’s latest commission – http://themusicuniverse.com/bon-jovi-album-cover-is-work-of-florida-artist/

To see what Uelsmann is doing these days – and to see many more examples of his work (for which he won a Lucie Award For Achievement in Fine Art Photography in 2015) – I’d invite you to visit his web site at http://www.uelsmann.net/

h) The writing staff at teamrock.com recently posted an article on their site in which they talk to noted cover designer Aubrey Powell (of Hipgnosis fame) about “the making of” one of Pink Floyd’s best-known cover images – that for the band’s 1975 release titled Wish You Were Here, an image which showcased a handshake between two nicely-dressed men, one of whom happened to be on fire. According to the article, executives at the group’s label at the time (Harvest/Columbia) didn’t appreciate the liberal use of symbolism (no one likes “getting burned” by their partners), and so it’s interesting to hear from Powell about how the team managed to include a number of unusual elements in the record’s packaging, including their use of a black plastic wrapping which concealed the provocative cover…

http://teamrock.com/feature/2016-10-21/pink-floyd-wish-you-were-here-album-artwork-interview

i) World-renowned pop artist Ron English – who has a very nice portfolio of album cover images to his name, including work for The Dandy Warhols, Slash and Korn, among others – has used his talents to help illustrate just how crass, manipulative (but, ultimately, influential) ads for consumer products can be at times, so with his unique eye and mind set brought to task, we now have a chance to see how he thinks the world might look one year after the world has decriminalized cannabis products in a new show now on display in NYC. Writer Ben Adams, in a recent article for Merry Jane magazine, shares an interview he did recently with English about the new show during which he shares his take on the world of advertising, consumerism, info on some of his newer works and how album covers and posters can still be valuable additions to the arsenal of products that musical acts can enable to engage and communicate with their fans – https://www.merryjane.com/culture/ron-english-popaganda-popaganja-art-show-interview

j) Photography has always been an important part of how rap and hip-hop artists have both shared their creative visions with us and used those images to project whatever aspects of their personalities and life styles – whether real or imagined – the so chose to share, but the identities of many of the photographers who’ve been there to document these personalities and participate in their projects remain somewhat hidden. Artsy writer Demie Kim helps lift that veil of secrecy a bit with a new article featuring profiles on a dozen of the most-prolific shooters working in that genre since its earliest days, including Chi Modu, Michael Miller, Lisa Leone, Ricky Flores and Jonathan Mannion, among others – https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-12-photographers-who-captured-hip-hop-from-old-school-to-the-90s

k) Jonathan Mannion shows up again in another recent posting on Hip-Hop album cover photography, this time in an article on the Bella Naija info/entertainment portal about a new show of his photos of artists including Jay-Z, Nikki Minaj, Drake and others in Lagos, Nigeria organized as part of Cognac-maker Hennessy’s art and music series called “Hennessy Artistry”. Learn more about the show, titled “Beyond The Music” with Jonathan Mannion – via the link at https://www.bellanaija.com/2016/10/hennessy-nigeria-presents-jonathan-mannion-the-legend-behind-hip-hop-album-covers/

https://www.hennessy.com/en-int/music/hennessy-artistry

3) Sales/Auctions –

a) Now with all the ads for “Pre-Holiday Black Friday Extravaganza Super Sales” bombarding us, it’s nice to find an opportunity to find a unique product (or several) on offer from one of today’s better-known rock photographers. Ami Barwell’s portfolio of projects for acts including Motorhead, Foo Fighters, Iggy Pop, R.E.M., Paul Weller and The White Stripes (among many others) has given us fans many great portraits of our favorite musicians, so it’s great to see that she’s now going to offer several of her better-known images on a line of t-shirts that are available via her Etsy site – https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/ByAmiBarwell

Barwell’s photos have also graced the covers of music released by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Interpol, Bang Bang and The Cribs, so now you have a chance to add works by an accomplished shooter to your collection for a song (they make great gifts, too).

b) The Gotta Have Rock and Roll auction house’s soon-to-end Rock & Roll Pop Culture Auction and, for fans of album art, there are several items you might want to take a look at. There are photos – both for the actual album covers and alt takes shot during the same sessions – as well as artwork, printer’s proofs and other related production items for albums by The Doors, Fleetwood Mac, Little Feat, Lita Ford, Journey, Stevie Nicks, Prince, Bruce Springsteen and Steven Van Zant. Of course, memorabilia collectors will also find 800+ items including costumes, instruments used on stage, lyric sheets, posters, gold record awards and much more, so hop on over to the company’s site to take a look and get ready for the final auction action that takes place December 2nd.

Take a look and, if you’re lucky, bring home a new addition to your collection this holiday season.

All album cover-related items –  http://www.gottahaverockandroll.com/catalog.aspx

Original Artwork – http://www.gottahaverockandroll.com/Category/Artwork-206.html

c) Some pretty impressive sales results were posted during Heritage Auction’s Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction (as described in detail in earlier postings) which took place Saturday, November 12th in Dallas, TX both online and in person at their facilities. Examples of the items sold include:

– a “first state” mono Beatles “Butcher Cover” (the recalled cover to the band’s Yesterday & Today record) sold for $42,500, while a stereo version realized $8,125;

– a set of 12 color photos (including the negatives) taken on the set of The Beatles’ in performance for the film Hard Days Night was snapped up for $9,000;

– a promo stand-up for the Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers LP – featuring Mick Jagger – was sold for $3, 000;

– a 1976 EMI promo poster for the Sex Pistols’ “Anarchy In The UK” was picked up by some lucky collector for $1,875

There were loads of other interesting items that found new homes, so if you’d like to scour through the listings, feel free to click on over to – http://www.ha.com/7154

d) Remember that auction at Sotheby’s in London I told you about recently that was built around portions of the late David Bowie’s personal art collection? Well, they held the first segment (one of two) yesterday (Nov. 10th) and – well, let’s put it this way…rich people still have money to spend! For the 49 lots offered for sale – which included works by Warhol, Basquiat, Duchamp and others – the auction house raised over $30 million, well over twice the pre-auction estimates. Then on Friday the 11th, they held the auction for the remaining lots (with a focus on a collection of works of the “eccentric” Italian designer Ettore Sottsass and the Milan-based Memphis group) which, until now, looked to bring in another $3-5 million to the estate’s coffers. I had thought that it’d go a bit beyond that (wouldn’t you agree) but, in reality, the entire collection raised just under 1.4 million GB pounds, or approx. $1.75 million You can read more about that night’s details on the comsite in reporter Colin Gleadell’s summary of events, via the link – https://news.artnet.com/market/744056-744056? Two key items from the collection – Bowie’s Giacomo/Castiglioni record player and a lipstick-red “Valentine” typewriter – sold for big money, with the stereo going for £257,000 and the typewriter fetching £47,500.

There had been opportunities to look through examples of the items that were put up for auction during shows that have been staged in venues in Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York and London over the past year, but collectors at the London event had the unique opportunity to preview the entirety of what was be put up for sale (over 400 items!) at the Sotheby’s location in London, with an overview to this display provided to us by Artsy‘s Lorena Munoz-Alonso in this recent posting on their site – https://news.artnet.com/market/memphis-bowie-collector-sale-sothebys-london-730169?

4) New Print/Book Publishing –

a) Photographer Michael Zagaris has taken some of the best-known photo portraits of rock’s royalty – the Rolling Stones, Lou Reed & The Velvet Underground, Eric Clapton, Blondie, The Clash and so many others who found their way to the San Francisco Bay area in the 1970’s – and since he approached his subjects as a fan (rather than a paid shooter) most of the time, he was able to capture them in ways that more formal photo sessions would not have been able to. It also produced a large archive of unused photos which, until now, have mostly remained unseen, but Zagaris and the folks at Reel Art Press have worked hard to rectify that situation and recently released an anthology of his work called TOTAL EXCESS: PHOTOGRAPHS BY MICHAEL ZAGARIS.

The books 272 pages include hundreds of shots of stars in performance, behind the scenes and just mugging for the camera, capturing many of them early on in their careers. Fans of the ever-changing popular music scenes of the 70s and 80s will find a lot to love here. Zagaris, who started his career as a law student working for Robert Kennedy, took up photography to help him recover from the shock of Kennedy’s assassination in 1968 and soon after began covering the awe-inspiring local music/cultural scenes, which The Guardian‘s Charlotte DeFazio provides more details about in her recent profile on the man behind the camera – https://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/nov/07/rock-photographer-michael-zagaris-the-who-rolling-stones

Read more about the book on the publisher’s web site at http://www.reelartpress.com/catalog/edition/91/total-excess-photographs-by-michael-zagaris

b) While the late Swiss artist H.R. Giger may perhaps be better-known to the art world for his contributions to the movie business – after all, he did come up with the Oscar-winning surreal designs for James Cameron’s 1979 and 1986 sci-fi classics Alienand Aliens(who can forget the uber-scary Xenomorph creature and the doomed cargo ship?) – music fans have always been most-impressed with Giger’s fantastic cover images for classic rock records including Emerson Lake & Palmer’s Brain Salad Surgery and Debbie Harry’s solo effort titled Koo Koo.

To honor the painter/sculptor/set designer’s amazing portfolio of work, the folks at Taschen Books have just released a new book for collectors (simply titled H.R. Giger) that includes 400 “SUMO-sized” (15″ x 20″) pages that detail his paintings, sculptures, record covers and designs for films, the stage and his own unique take on architecture and design. The limited-release tome has been produced in an edition of only 1000 copies and includes scholarly essays, a number of multi-page spreads, examples of the artist’s own writings and much more. Priced at $900 per copy, the book is available now via Taschen’s web site – https://www.taschen.com/pages/en/catalogue/art/all/06390/facts.hr_giger.htm where you will also find details on the two additional “Art Editions” of the book that are also available – a $2000 edition of 100 pieces that is signed by Carmen Giger (the artist’s second wife and director of the Giger Museum in Gruyeres, Switzerland) and is packaged with Untitled, “a ready-to-hang relief cast from an original polyester sculpture created by Giger in 1964” and a 100-piece package priced at $3000 which adds a copy of a 1965 photogravure titled Gebärmaschine (Second state).

Make this book your lucky star…”You…lucky, lucky, lucky, lucky, lucky…”

c) Publisher United Editions has released a new limited edition compendium of designs made for punk and post-punk record releases called Action Time Vision: Punk & Post-Punk 7″ Record Sleeves which, according to the publisher, “is a celebration of DIY graphics… all have an urgency and an exhilarating disregard for design conventions that makes them exceptional. They are all clarion calls for independence and freedom from pop industry norms.” Examples of these works were in the collections of Unit Edition’s founder Tony Brook and scholar Russ Bestley, and the book also includes interviews with luminaries and experts in the field, an example of which is designer Malcolm Garrett, whose covers for the Buzzcocks, Simple Minds, Duran Duran and others helped usher in the use of computers and other DIY tools to create memorable images for music industry clients going forward. Creative Reviewwriter Mark Sinclair caught up with Garrett to discuss both his role in the development of this still-impactful aesthetic and, in particular, how his collaborations with the Buzzcocks moved him along the path to a new visual language for the punk era – https://www.creativereview.co.uk/action-time-vision-malcolm-garrett-buzzcocks/

You can take a closer look at the book on the publisher’s web site at https://uniteditions.com/

d) Wilfred Limonious might not be well-known to rock music fans here in the U.S., but to fans of album art – particularly to fans of Jamaican dancehall music – his illustrations are legendary and continue to influence many in the world’s design community. To document his work, author and Edmonton (AB, Canada) library technician Christopher Bateman undertook a lengthy world-wide search (including multiple trips to Jamaica) to collect hundreds of examples of work and the details behind them, ultimately publishing the results in a new 272 page hardcover book (published by One Love Books) titledIn Fine Style: The Dancehall Art of Wilfred LimoniousEdmonton Journal reporter Fish Griwkowsky talked to Bateman just prior to his book launch event this week and shared the details in an article –  http://edmontonjournal.com/entertainment/books/edmonton-author-pays-tribute-to-legendary-jamaican-artist-limonious

e) Continuing on my reporting of new punk-era-themed books coming to market (you’ll recall my earlier report on United Editions’ new book on punk/post-punk 7″ single sleeves), I found a recent report on the Creative Review(U.K.) site about publisher Phaidon’s recent book built around the archives of collector/punk era historian (and one of the designers who founded the London-based artist collective called the Grey Organisation) Toby Mott called Oh So Pretty – Punk in Print 1976-80 that I want to point you to. With a collection of over 1000 items to select from (posters, flyers, ‘zines, album covers, etc.), the book’s 512 pages include over 500 photos/illustrations that, according to the publisher, reflect “a DIY spirit and instantly recognizable aesthetic that was as raw and strident and irrepressible as the music. As disposable as the items in this book once were, together they tell a story about music, history, class, and art, and document a seismic shift in society and visual culture.”

Read more about the book in Mark Sinclair’s article at Punk book – https://www.creativereview.co.uk/oh-pretty-punk-print-1976-80/

and you’ll find additional details on the Phaidon site at http://www.phaidon.com/store/fashion-culture/oh-so-pretty-punk-in-print-1976-1980-9780714872759/

5) Other articles of interest –

a) Voting has begun for this year’s “Best Art Vinyl” competition, staged by frame-maker and lover of all records packaged in 12″ square sleeves, the U.K.’s Art Vinyl. Visitors to the site (http://www.artvinyl.com/LP-records-displayed-as-artwork-prize/) can view the 50 nominated album cover images and then select three to put your support behind during the voting period which lasts from now until early January, with the results being posted on January 5th.

Fans in Italy and the U.K. also can look at the covers in person at two exhibits currently on display – one at the Semm Music Store in Bologna, Italy and the other at London’s Vinyl Cafe (Kings Cross), with the winners being announced in an event at the Hari Hotel in the Belgravia section of London on January 5th.

The team at the Creative Review site have put together a nice overview of the competition for your perusal prior to voting – https://www.creativereview.co.uk/art-vinyls-record-sleeves-year-2016/

and then, when you’re ready, you can head on over to the voting page to add your input – http://www.artvinyl.com/best-record-cover-design-competition/

May the best designs win – stay tuned for more details.

b) Film-maker Adam McDaniel has launched his fund-raising campaign on the IndieGogo site for the film he’s working on about the career of the late great illustrator Richard Amsel.

One perk available to supporters provides a double-dose of album art talent – Art Director Mike Salisbury, who worked with Amsel on promo art/materials for films such as Raiders of the Lost Ark and The Dark Crystal (and who, like Amsel, also created an impressive collection of album cover images), has donated two signed copies of his now-out-of-print book An Art Director Confesses: I Sold Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll to the campaign, each available to collectors in return for a $150 donation.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/amsel-illustrator-of-the-lost-art-movie#/

c) Boulder, Colorado-based specialty vinyl publisher/record club Vinyl Me Please has impressed collectors with their dedication to special packaging, delivering music by both established (Beck, Black Sabbath, Fugees, Weezer and others) and “emerging” (The Books, Nils Frahm, Glass Animals, etc.) in packages that include colored vinyl, unique album imagery, posters, stickers, etc. – a much more-fulfilling retail packages for fans of the acts featured each month.

Another Vice-related site called The Creator’s Project recently posted an article written by Beckett Mufson about how VMP artists have reworked ten classic album images to create something new and exciting for the club’s subscribers. The new covers for Sabbath’s Paranoid and Beck’s Odelay certainly are eye-catching, but it’s up to you to decide which ones best-represent the music packaged inside…

http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/10-classic-album-covers-get-modern-illustration

d) The Beatles’  Sgt. Pepper’s record features what is perhaps (if you believe the polls – is that a wise thing to do these days?) the best-known and loved album cover image in rock music history. The assemblage created by Sir Peter Blake, Jann Haworth, Michael Cooper and art director Robert Fraser featured life-size cardboard cut-outs, wax figures and other props, with the band and many famous/infamous people included in the mix. Over the years, this image has been spoofed, recreated and bastardized for a variety of different purposes, so it is not surprising to see another like the one featured in this ITV News article. However, this one – created by Twitter user christhebarker – is particularly poignant as it includes images of the many celebrities – including musicians such as David Bowie, Prince and Leonard Cohen (talk about up-to-the-minute) and others well-known around the world (it even includes a bright red “Make America Great Again” cap in the foreground).

http://www.itv.com/news/2016-11-11/touching-tribute-to-celebrities-lost-in-2016-using-sergeant-pepper-album-cover/

To see the larger version posted on the artist’s site, follow this link – http://www2.b3ta.com/host/creative/4270/1478856455/2016lc.jpg

Bonus content – If you’re like me, you thought that 2016 was a pretty horrible year overall (for a variety of reasons). If you’d like to tell the year to “Kiss Off” in a slightly more vulgar fashion, here’s a link to a video that comedian/social commentator John Oliver created that features appropriate send-offs supplied by celebrities and us “normal” (i.e., depressed) people, too – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQ6WPo-oW5Q

e) I’m very excited to be able to share some preliminary details with you regarding designer Lawrence Azerrad’s newest project with the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) that, based on my first read, should be of interest to anyone actively involved in the design community (either as an artist/illustrator, branding/marketing executive, packaging designer, etc.) and, in particular, those who focus on the intersection of the worlds of art/design and music.

Boing Boing‘s David Peskovitz recently posted an intro article on the project –https://boingboing.net/2016/11/04/design-and-the-future-of-the-m.html in which Azerrad relates why he believes that, in today’s much-more-passive music world, people are missing out on many of the aspects – particularly the visual ones – that used to draw fans closer to the musical acts they admired, so he hopes that, with this initiative, designers can work to re-establish these ties. This also has the nice side-effect of keeping more of those working in the visual communications field employed and busy with music industry-related projects… Read more about the project in an aptly-titled article (“The Design + Music Industries are BFFs—They Just Don’t Know it Yet”) you’ll find on the AIGA site – https://eyeondesign.aiga.org/the-vital-links-between-the-design-music-industries-how-can-they-enhance-one-another/

I’ll be sure to share more as I learn more about this exciting new initiative.

f) You’ve seen examples of “sleeve-facing” before here in our news summary, but this is the first time I’ve seen one brought to life and, in this case, it was done in support of the efforts of a classic rock radio station, so it’s all the more appealing (at least to me). If you click on over to this article by David Kiefaber on AdWeek’s “Adfreak” feature page, you’ll find more info and a link to a video created by Vancouver (Canada) ad group Spring for their client, local classic rock station Rock 101to promote it’s morning oldies show where staffers lip-synch to song clips from the Rolling Stones, Bowie, Loverboy and others all while having a portion of their faces/bodies covered by a classic album cover image.

Nicely done, and proving, once again, the long-lasting connection between time-honored music and the sleeves they’re packaged in – http://www.adweek.com/adfreak/radio-station-made-fun-clever-use-album-covers-ad-its-morning-show-174094

g) While singer/actor Jarrod Spector has garnered a good reputation for his own musicality via his featured roles in the Broadway musical hits Jersey Boys and Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, if given the opportunity to star in a new musical featuring the songs of his own favorite musical act, without hesitation he’d star in one – if it existed – that was based on the music of Bruce Springsteen. Raised in the Philadelphia, PA area, Spector has been a fan of The Boss and his music for as long as he can remember, and so when Playbill Magazine photographer Monica Simoes approached him to work on re-creating several of Springsteen’s best-known album covers, he was only too happy to oblige (in fact, he includes his own version of “Born To Run” in his cabaret act). Playbill writer Mark Ezovski talks to Jarrod about his career and Bruce fandom in this article – complete with photos and performance video – for the Playbill web site –  http://www.playbill.com/article/exclusive-jarrod-spector-covers-bruce-springsteen-and-recreates-iconic-album-covers

R.I.P. I’d like to note the passing of Al Brodax this past week at the age of 90. For those of us growing up in the 1960’s, Mr. Brodax delivered a couple of examples of what would turn out to be very-influential cartoon animation while at King Features Syndicate – the Saturday Morning Cartoon Beatles series (beginning in 1965) and then, in 1968, working with a meager budget and very little help from the band, produced a psychedelic film (directed by George Dunning, art-directed by Hanz Edelmann and featuring art/animation by a large crew that included Ron Campbell, Paul Driessen, Dianne Jackson and Heavy Metal director Gerald Potterton, among others) for the ages – Yellow Submarine.  You can read Brodax’s William Grimes-penned obit in the NY Times via the link – http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/29/movies/al-brodax-who-steered-the-beatles-yellow-submarine-to-the-screen-dies-at-90.html?

He’s a REAL Nowhere Man, now, but will forever hold a place in this young (now old) Beatles fan’s heart.

That’s all for now – look for updates every week (typically, on a Friday) on our news feed –https://www.facebook.com/AlbumCoverHallOfFame – we’ll be back early next month with another summary for you.

All text Copyright 2016 Mike Goldstein and AlbumCoverHallofFame.com – All Rights Reserved. All of trade names mentioned in these summaries are the properties of their respective owners and are used for reference only.

Album Cover Art And Artist News Summary For The Month Of September, 2016

AlbumCoverHallofFame.com News Logo

ALBUM COVER HALL OF FAME’S ALBUM COVER ART AND ARTIST NEWS RECAP FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER, 2016

It’s the beginning of October, 2016, with the Fall season in full force here in Chicago – leaves changing colors, the humidity taking a back seat to crisp evening temps and, for those of us new (again) to the area, the famously-frigid Winter weather looming in front of us, with only the thoughts of a hot deep-dish pizza making the prospects tolerable. If you’re either a hearty soul or someone living in warmer climes, I hope that all you’re thinking about right now is a) “how will I survive this Election season?” (don’t forget to VOTE!) and b) “what the heck is going on in the album art/artist world these day, to which I’d like to propose that you now spend a few minutes catching up on your album cover art/artist-related news which, as you all know by now, you’ll find summarized in both my weekly and monthly recaps.

In this month’s summary, you’ll see that the people that make our favorite album imagery continue to make news with their ongoing contributions to the field of album art/packaging, contributing to the ongoing stream of articles, interviews, info on museum and gallery shows and the like on a wide range of related topics. Enjoy the read and let me know if you have any questions or comments:

1) Upcoming, recently-launched and just-closed show/exhibitions –

a) London’s Museum of Brands, Packaging & Advertising will soon (on October 4th) be launching a new exhibition that’ll be a must-see for fans of punk/do-it-yourself-because-you-can’t-f**king-trust-anyone-else product marketing, promotion and advertising. Located “just around the corner from the world-famous Portobello Road Market”, the museum will host a display which they’re calling the “Graphics Of Punk” which, using a large collection of prints, posters, underground magazines, advertisements, consumer products and, most-importantly (at least to us), album cover/record sleeve images, works to illustrate how these “radical campaigns draw a visual parallel between the political climate of the time and its punk graphics aesthetics.”

In addition to the items on display, the museum will be hosting a series of talks throughout the show’s run, including one on punk-era typography by designer/author Sarah Hyndman (titled “Never Mind The Typography”, taking place Tuesday, November 15th). Writer Sarah Dawood gives us a preview of the show in this article on the Design Week web site – https://www.designweek.co.uk/issues/26-september-2-october-2016/new-graphics-punk-exhibition-will-showcase-outrage-era/  with more info on visiting the museum during the show’s run (through January 29th, 2017) available on the venue’s site at

http://www.museumofbrands.com/whats-on/exhibitions/the-graphics-of-punk-4-october-to-29-january.html

The museum is the love child of consumer products/promotion guru Robert Opie, so it will be interesting to see how he and his people inter-relate this display’s unique grouping and messaging with the thousands of other items that make up their collection.

b) I’ve reported previously on the recently-launched (September 26th) graphic design/illustration exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London called “You Say You Want A Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966-1970,” but, with the show’s kick-off now past us, I wanted to share a recent article by The Guardian’s Graphic Arts writer Liz Hoggard that provides us with some additional insights and details about a number of the designers – including many well-known album cover & gig poster artists including Martin Sharp (Disraeli Gears for Cream), Mike McInnerney (Tommy for The Who) and the team of Nigel Waymouth and Michael English of Hapshash & the Coloured Coat, among many others – whose works provided the colorful, mind-blowing and sometimes head-scratching backdrop to the art, fashion and music of the era, as well as the inspiration for the punk, new wave and other scenes that’d soon follow.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/sep/04/revolutionary-artists-60s-counterculture-v-and-a-you-say-you-want-a-revolution

The show will run through Sunday, February26, 2017, with more information nicely presented on the Museum’s web site – http://www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/you-say-you-want-a-revolution-records-and-rebels-1966-70

There will be several related activities kids young and old can participate in during the show’s run, including two “Create! Graphic Design” events in October, free talks/gallery tours and a Conference & Symposium on Friday, the 4th of November which is described as an event during which participants will “explore how the social, cultural and political dynamic changes enacted in the late 1960s continue to impact on our world today and help us think about the world tomorrow. Topics will include:  counter culture to cyber culture, ideology in politics, the uses of hallucinogenic drugs and environmentalism.”

Quite a way to spend a day.

c) Prog Rock imagery fans now have something to plan for – Roger Dean, creator of many of the most-memorable album covers over the past 40+ years (including those for YES, Uriah Heep, ASIA and others) is the subject of a new exhibition that opened on October 1st at the Trading Boundaries gallery space on Sheffield Green in East Sussex, U.K. that’s titled “Pathways”. According to the gallery’s press release, ” Trading Boundaries will be exhibiting original paintings, watercolours, drawings, sketches and prints, many for the first time and many of which will be for sale, including the original painting for Rick Wakeman’s ‘The Myths & Legends of King Arthur 2016’…Paintings and artwork will be on display throughout our showrooms as well as in our permanent gallery of Roger’s work here.

The show’s opening day featured sets by the the very-popular YES tribute band SEYES and, to add some further enticement, at 7PM on Saturday, October 22nd, those with an artistic bent can attend a painting workshop lead by the talented Mr. Dean himself. Tickets for that event can be purchased in advance via this link – http://www.tradingboundaries.com/collections/tickets/products/roger-dean-painting-workshop-br-saturday-22nd-october-br   with more information on this show, which runs through October 30th, available on the gallery’s web site –  http://www.tradingboundaries.com/pages/roger-dean-gallery

d) Director Ron Howard’s new film about the formative touring years of The Beatles, titled The Beatles: Eight Days A Week, has been earning much praise from fans and film critics, with one San Francisco-based art gallery – the San Francisco Art Exchange, well-known for their deep and impressive album art catalog – having served as a photographic consultant to the film-makers. To showcase the Beatles imagery both in the film and in their collection, the SFAE has put up an online Beatles-related photo exhibition, with most items (as well as others you won’t find online) available for purchase as fine art prints for your home. The film focuses on the four straight years of touring the band did between August, 1962 and August, 1966 during which they both perfected their song-writing/performance skills (releasing 11 studio albums in the U.S., from Please Please Me to Revolver) and their public personas via their films (Hard Day’s Night and Help!), TV appearances and constant interaction with the press, so you can be sure to find images from photographers including Robert Whitaker, Ken Regan, Jim Marshall, Terry O’Neill and others that you’ll both know well and those that will bring back fond memories.

http://www.sfae.com/index.php?pg=400137

e) I have to admit that, for the longest time, I thought that artist Ralph Steadman had contributed the artwork for Pink Floyd’s “The Wall” when, in fact, it was produced by another talented pen-and-ink-focused artist, Gerald Scarfe (please tell me that I’m not the only one who thought this). In any case, Mr. Steadman does have a nice album cover resume, having done record packaging for musical acts including Ambrosia, Nils Lofgren and Frank Zappa, as well as spoken word albums built around the witticisms of the man who is perhaps most-associated with Steadman – “gonzo” writer Hunter S. Thompson – so it’s my pleasure to announce that there’s a new career-retrospective exhibition being staged at the gallery of the Society of Illustrators in NYC.

Titled “A Retrospective: Ralph Steadman”, the show celebrates “the work and career of iconic artist Ralph Steadman. This special exhibition will cover three floors of galleries and is a once-in-a-lifetime chance for the public to view a collection of his groundbreaking pieces spanning his 50 year career.” You’ll find examples of his work that’s been used to illustrate books, magazines, films and other forms of media, including items that have appeared in Rolling Stone Magazine, The Times of London, the New York Times and many others. The Society’s site also lists a number of related events, with details available via the link –http://www.societyillustrators.org/exhibits/retrospective

f) Fans of the late David Bowie are in for a treat now that Guido Harari has launched the latest photo show at his Wall of Sound Gallery in Alba, Italy that is built around a collection of nearly 40 photos taken of Bowie by the famed Japanese photographer Maysayoshi Sukita, best known for the photos used on the covers of Bowie’s Heroes and The Next Day records. Assembled in cooperation with ONO Arte Contemporanea – who are holding their own related exhibition this month at their gallery in Bologna featuring Sukita portraits of Bowie along with Iggy Pop and Marc Bolan (http://www.onoarte.com/current-exhibition.php) – the show, according to Mr. Harari, includes “a series of portraits taken in London in 1972, in New York in 1973 and some live photographs taken in Japan in the same year. There are also iconic images and several outtakes from the 1977 Heroes shoot, some from a trip to Kyoto, Japan, in 1980 and some more recent portraits taken between 1989 and 2002 for the promotion of the Heathen album.”

Visitors to the gallery’s promo page for this show – http://www.wallofsoundgallery.com/en/heroes–C-bowie–C-sukita-e18 – can also download a PDF brochure with more info and imagery. A master photographer teaming up with a master musician/actor/trend-setter – sounds like a great reason to visit.

g) In last month’s news summary, I had shared the details about the launch of a new exhibition (running now thru October 16th at the Manhattan Beach Art Center in Manhattan Beach, CA) titled Contemporary Post Future! The Dichotomy of Design and Art – John Van Hamersveld which features a large display of the talented designers commercial and fine art works, including a 47-panel modular black and creme-colored collage/mural JVH created. In early September, I added an update that story that included some exciting new info – on Sunday 9/11, John and Alida staged a poster sale/signing where 50% of poster sales, along with a portion of sales from the exhibit, will be donated to support the MBAC. Owners of previously-unsigned JVH prints were also able to bring their works in to be signed, with pricing for this service beginning at $40 per item and going up, depending on the item.

More information on the show can be found via this link – http://www.citymb.info/city-officials/parks-and-recreation/cultural-arts/exhibition/creative-arts-center-exhibitions#ad-image-1 and, to see more of John’s work – posters, prints, photos, murals and much more, click on over to his site at http://www.post-future.com/

h) Exhibition curator Doug Sjoquist recently put together a show featuring 50+ examples of great album art in a display that was called “The Golden Age Of Album Art” which ran through September 30th at the Keys To Creativity event gallery located in the Lansing Mall in Lansing, MI. The show was built, according to the gallery’s site, as an “exploration of the many multicultural art forms that appeared on album covers from 1967 to 1983 and greatly influenced American art and culture.” The show’s organizers enhanced the display with a lecture and music, including (on September 25th) a lecture (given by the curator and co-hosted by the Capital Area Blues Society) and concert by local blues legend Thornetta Davis that served as a fund-raiser for the Society’s Artist In Residence Program. An article in the local Citypulse Magazine served to introduce the exhibition and related events – http://lansingcitypulse.com/events/view/74121/the_golden_age_of_album_art_with_doug_sjoquist.html , with more information available on the gallery’s site at http://www.keystocreativity.net/event-gallery.html

2) Artist interviews/profile articles –

a) The Guardian’s Dave Simpson recently published an article based on a pretty simple premise – ask a grouping of album cover artists, consisting of well-known names from the field both young and old(er), “what’s the best-designed album sleeve?” – and the results, as you might figure, are both quite insightful and surprising. You’ll hear from creatives who have 30+ years of well-regarded work, including Roger Dean, Vaughan Oliver, Peter Saville and others, as well as younger artists who’ve quickly built up strong reputations in the area such as Jonathan Barnbrook, Carson Ellis, Mr. Scot Sandler and several more. As is always the case with articles published in Europe, the article also introduces us to several artists who you (and I) were probably unfamiliar with, so it’s also rewarding to learn more about “fresh talent” who are making waves in the field.

I still find it fascinating that many of the covers held in the highest regard were created in the mid-late 1970s, a period that many consider one of album cover design’s “golden ages”…

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/sep/22/the-greatest-record-sleeves-as-chosen-by-the-designers

b) While I like to think that our site is well-respected for the quality of the reporting and access to info and interviews with the broadest range of talent working in the album art world, I have to admit that there are several other sites who display the same passion for the subject material as I do and who are also producing fine work for fans of album art and artists. One such person is Atlanta, GA-based writer Loring Kemp, whose blog Cover Our Tracks has posted several fine interviews with music industry-focused artists since it appeared on my radar several months ago.

Just posted this past week by another contributor to that site – Lara Kristin Herndon – is an interview with veteran illustrator Bob Pepper, a man who has made quite the name for himself in all areas of illustration, producing memorable artwork for clients in the music, book, game and advertising worlds. Beginning his career in the music industry in the early 1960s creating covers for Bill Harvey at Nonesuch and Elektra Records, Pepper went on to create one of the most-memorable covers of the psychedelic era – Love’s Forever Changes, released in 1967. While that one cover might be his best-known, he went on to create several dozen others for musical acts in the classical, electronic and world music genres, so it is a real treat to hear more from the artist regarding the arc of his career, his inspirations, what sort of music he prefers (one hint – it’s complicated) and his take on how digital formats have somewhat lessened the full-on album listening experience.

http://www.coverourtracks.com/single-post/2016/09/26/Bob-Pepper—The-Cover-Our-Tracks-Interview

Eager to see more from Loring & Co. as it is released…

c) Now, why exactly didn’t the record label want Metallica’s debut album to feature a bloody, hatchet-wielding hand coming out of a toilet and the title Metal Up Your Ass? Instead, fans got a slightly-toned-down record called Kill ‘Em All that featured an image that, to those with little imagination, could simply have been the result of a mistake by an apprentice carpenter (yeah, right). With a new Metallica record – one that will be titled Hardwired – due out in a couple of months, the editors at the TeamRock site revisited the story behind the band’s first album image with the band’s drummer Lars Ulrich, who waxes nostalgic for the time they almost got to really upset the PMRC (still can’t forgive Tipper for this) – http://teamrock.com/feature/2016-09-02/the-story-behind-metallica-s-kill-em-all-album-artwork-lars-ulrich-interview

d) Yes, friends, we’re all getting old(er) – this month celebrates the 25th anniversary of the release of Nirvana’s break-through 1991 recording Nevermind which featured many hit songs and one of the most-memorable album cover images of the rock era. The band had enlisted Austin, TX-based photographer Kirk Weddle, who specialized in underwater photography, to come up with the iconic “baby in a pool” shot and, in this recent audio interview/article by the CBC’s Candy Palmater, shares his recollections of the session, along with some out-takes featuring the band cavorting in the same pool – http://www.cbc.ca/radio/q/schedule-for-tuesday-september-20-2016-1.3770140/nevermind-at-25-kirk-weddle-on-shooting-nirvana-s-iconic-album-cover-1.3770143

I had the pleasure of working with Kirk a couple of years ago on a “Featured Artist Portfolio” article for the ACHOF web site that you might want to re-visit as well – https://albumcoverhalloffame.wordpress.com/2014/02/21/featured-album-cover-artist-portfolio-kirk-weddle/   to see a broader selection of this talented photographer’s archives.

e) Fans of Pop Culture should enjoy this recently-posted article on The Undefeated site by Martenzie Johnson about sculptor/special-effects artist Diana Walczak and her work with art director David Coleman and the late Michael Jackson on the making of the album cover sculpture/image used on his 1995 follow-up to the huge-selling Dangerous record, an album titled Michael Jackson: HISTORY – Past, Present and Future, Book 1. Jackson, quite unhappy with the way that he was treated in the press and by his business partners, was determined to work from a position of strength going forward and felt that the best way to represent his power would be via his representation in a statue that would make Roman emperors jealous. And who better to create such an imposing representation than the artist who created the fantastic costumes and props for movies and theme park attractions including Judge Dredd, the Amazing Spider Man, X-Men and even the I-thought-for-sure-it-was-Annette-Benning robed torch-bearer who introduces productions from Columbia Pictures?

Learn all about the concepts, process and whatever happened to the several-hundred-pound sculpture that served as the basis for the imposing photo found on the record, with details available via the link at  http://theundefeated.com/features/cover-stories-the-album-and-cd-cover-for-michael-jacksons-1995-history-past-present-and-future-book-i/

f) Tommy Bishop book release/profile article – see item in Section 4

3) Sales/Auctions –

a) Related to the article in Section 2 about Kirk Weddle’s photos from the Nevermind session, the Austin, TX gallery that displays Weddle’s work – the Modern Rocks Gallery – is offering reduced shipping charges (as low as $1!) for both domestic and international collectors who purchase one or more of the images from this special collection. To see what’s available, click on over to the gallery’s site via this link – http://www.modernrocksgallery.com/shop-nirvana-nevermind/

b) Many of you will instantly-recognize the photos – album covers, portraits and behind-the-scenes shots – of photographer James Fortune (his 1974 shot of a semi-mutilated Iggy Pop in a performance at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go that was used on the cover of Mr. Pop’s California Bleeding LP remains one of my favorites), so I was pleased to see that Modern Rocks Gallery now also counts him as one of their artists and has added his works to their permanent collection, with signed, limited-edition prints from his archive now available for sale there.

I had the pleasure of interviewing Mr. Fortune a number of years ago about “the making of” the Iggy Pop cover – http://rockpopgallery.typepad.com/rockpop_gallery_news/2007/07/cover-story—i.html  As I noted back then, “beginning as a photographer for his college paper in the late ’60s, Fortune spent more than a decade photographing rock music icons like The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Doors, Paul McCartney, Led Zeppelin, Elton John, and countless others. His catalog of over 15,000 images from the tumultuous ’60s and ’70s contains shots of everything from hippie riots in Hollywood to Gene Simmons and Cher sharing an eclair.” The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and Museum has over 150 of Fortune’s shots in their permanent collection, so I’d invite collectors looking to add something both historic and visually exciting to their collection to check out this new offering on the Modern Rocks Gallery site at http://www.modernrocksgallery.com/james-fortune-photographer

c) The spirit of Max’s Kansas City, the NYC nightclub opened in 1965 by the late Mickey Ruskin which served as an unofficial meeting place for a veritable “who’s who” of the city’s Pop Culture icons of the time, continues to live and breathe via the efforts of Mickey’s wife Yvonne and her Max’s Kansas City Foundation. The non-profit has continued on in its efforts to support those in the arts who might need help with housing, medical services and/or legal aid via one-time grants, with friends of the organization continuing their support of the organization via a series of fund-raising auction such as the one that took place (ending September 21st) with the help of Foundation partner Paddle8. Still viewable online at https://paddle8.com/auction/maxs-kansas-city/ , the recent auction included a whole host of items donated by music and art-industry stalwarts including photographer George DuBose (who donated a wonderful shot used on the cover of TooTought To Die by the Ramones; an awesome portrait byMick Rock of singer Freddie Mercury; a print of Elliott Landy’s infrared photo of Bob Dylan taken outside his home in Woodstock; a portrait by Dezo Hoffman of the late Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones; Bob Gruen’s photo tribute to Max’s KC; Roberta Bayley stunning portrait of punk icon Richard Hell and Richard Aaron’s shot of music-makers Patti Smith and Lou Reed.

Also on offer was an Alice Cooper-signed Welcome To My Nightmare litho (with art by Drew Struzan); Ramones logo designer Arturo Vega’s art print titled “Porn Is The New Rock” and a print titled 30 Years of Punk Rock by Laurence Gartel, the digital artist who taught Andy Warhol how to use a personal computer (an Amiga, in case you were wondering). Collectors were also able to bid on (as detailed on the auction site) “Kate Pierson’s outfit from the B52’s Orgasmic Tour, the Max’s banner from the tv series “Life On Mars” signed by the cast, a dress prototype designed by Tiger Morse, the high priestess of fashion, Joe Jackson’s electric piano and sax used on several of his tours and so much more.” While you might be a bit too late to participate in the auction, you can certainly lend your support to the organization’s ongoing efforts via a secure donation on their web site – http://maxskansascity.org/

4) New Print/Book Publishing –

a) Baltimore, MD-based designer/writer Darius Wilmore is going to be releasing a new book meant to illustrate just how important “the visuals” have been to the success of artists in the rap/hip-hop world, helping those making the music better-establish their unique personas and better bond with their fans. The book, titled StereoTyped: Hip-Hop’s Unsung Graphic Design Heroes, Heroines, and the Oral and Visual Histories of the Rap Record (1979-1988), will be published next year by Full Circle Press and is the print version of Wilmore’s popular blog by the same name.

Writing for The Shadow League sports site, reporter Erica Blount Danois celebrates the recent anniversary of the first Sugar Hill Gang (“Rapper’s Delight”) record with this interview in which she talks to Wilmore about that record’s famous “candy cane” logo, his time working as part of Def Jam’s marvelous in-house design studio (Drawing Board Graphic Design), the effort it has taken him to complete his book (which I can personally attest to!) and how, without mainstream TV/radio distribution, rap and hip-hop album covers served to introduce the genre to audiences world-wide.

https://www.theshadowleague.com/story/stereo-typed-a-journey-of-hip-hop-cover-art

b) I recently had the pleasure of adding a new book to the ACHOF’s Resources section that’s due out next month and which focuses on the huge array of photographic talent who have contributed to the promotion and sales of music by our favorite acts. The soon-to-be-released new album art book -titled Total Records: Photography and the Art of the Album Cover, published by photo collective Aperture – will feature over 400 covers that were built around the photo and art directing talents of esteemed artists including David Bailey, Anton Corbijn, Robert Frank, Nan Goldin, Jean-Paul Goude, Brian Griffin, Danny Lyon, Robert Mapplethorpe, Martin Parr, Irving Penn, Cindy Sherman, Pennie Smith, Andy Warhol, Albert Watson and many, many more.

The book’s editors are certainly well-credentialed to have put together such a comprehensive tome on the subject – Antoine de Beaupré is the founder of Paris bookstore/publishing house Librarie 213/Edition 213; Sam Stourdzé, the director of the well-regarded French photography festival Les Rencontres d’Arles and art/entertainment writer Serge Vincendet. It also includes text by music journalist Jacques Denis as well as an interview with photographer and music video director Jean-Baptiste Mondino (who shot the controversial cover of a naked Prince for his Lovesexy release in 1988).

There’s a travelling art show built around the book that was recently (thru October 2nd) on display at Robert Capa Contemporary Photography Center’s exhibition titled “Total Records – The Great Adventure of Album Cover Photography” – more info at http://capacenter.hu/en/kiallitasok/total-records-2/  . The show opened this past June at the Center in Budapest, Hungary and will soon be moving on to two more venues, the first being a display at the C/O Berlin Foundation (from December 3, 2016–February 5, 2017) and then on to the Kunsthal Rotterdam (February 24–June 4, 2017).

c) A popular book on album cover art has just been updated – The Greatest Album Covers Of All Time, first released in 2008 produced by music writers Barry Miles and Johnny Morgan and art director Grant Scott and published by Collins & Brown – will be re-released in early October. Same name, new and updated. According to the publishers, “with the resurgence of vinyl, album cover art is as important as ever. This visually sumptuous book brings together 275 of the greatest album covers of all time. arranged chronologically, beginning in 1956. A 50-strong panel of judges—including designers, musicians, producers, and record company executives—made the final selection, and their reasons accompany the photographs. From rock ‘n’ roll to pop, R&B to jazz, punk, blues, and even folk, the covers include both classics and less well-known works, and every one made an impact, either artistically, stylistically, or culturally. Music fans will enjoy looking back at their favorites and debating the selection.” The book’s been updated to include new album covers that have tantalized our eyes during the past eight years. Look for it at your favorite book-seller on the Pavillion/Collins & Brown imprint. 272 pages, hardcover. ISBN-13: 978-1910231982

d) Having built up a strong reputation for his slightly-strange designs for indie bands including The Unawares, Boo Hag, the Transylvania Rats and Los Perdidos, artist/illustrator Tommy Bishop, after relocating from Spartanburg, SC to my most-recent stomping grounds (Portland, OR – we must have passed each other on I-80, unless of course he took I-90), returned to South Carolina the weekend of September 17th-18th to celebrate the launch party for his new kid’s book titled The Incredibly Strange ABCs. Wanting to create something for his young daughter, Bishop has designed and illustrated a book where each letter of the alphabet is represented by a character that is, if I might say, a lot less like Dr. Seuss and a lot more like Ed Roth’s “Rat Fink” (e.g., “A” features Albert Appleworm, a creature who “absolutely adores accounting”).

Writing for The State (Columbia, SC) web site, Erin Shaw’s article serves to introduce you to the artist and this event (party and reading/book-signing on Sunday, September 18th at Tapp’s Art Center) – http://www.thestate.com/entertainment/local-events/article101736597.html with up-to-the-minute details via the event’s Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/events/176405956098437/

e) While I’ve already shared information on the new Bowie-focused show now on display at photographer Guido Harari’s Wall of Sound Gallery in Italy, I also wanted to point out that Guido himself is soon to release a new, limited-edition book of photos of one of his favorite subjects, the very talented (and photogenic) singer Kate Bush (that will be titled The Kate Inside), which got its own gallery show this past month in London at the Art Bermondsey Project Space. According to the press release I received, “the show will open on Sept. 13 until Sept. 30 and will be bigger and very different from Guido’s 2014 exhibition at Snap Galleries. It will feature over 50 images, classic and unseen, available for purchase in different sizes.” The Kate Inside limited edition book will also be available and, as part of the festivities surrounding the book’s release, on September 16th there was a special Q&A event at the gallery featuring famed actor/mime (and teacher of the craft to both Mr. Bowie and Ms. Bush) Lindsay Kemp on a panel with Guido, choreographer Stewart Avon Arnold, musician Del Palmer and others.

With over 300 photos included, the hard-bound, 240-page book will be published in two signed/numbered editions – a “Regular Edition” of 1150 copies  along with 350 copies of a “Deluxe Edition”, with this special version also signed by Mr. Kemp, adding more value to any collector/fan of Ms. Bush-related imagery. You can read more and order your copy of this fascinating photo collection on Harari’s site via the link at http://www.wallofsoundgallery.com/en/the-kate-inside-by-guido_harari/the-kate-inside.php

5) Other articles of interest –

a) Space – the final frontier…who’d have thought that album art would be one of the ways that Man would choose to introduce us to civilizations “out there”? Some of you will recall the “Voyager Golden Record” package that astronomer Carl Sagan, along with a team that included writers Timothy Ferris and Ann Druyan, artists Jon Lomberg and Linda Salzman Sagan and astronomer/SETI pioneer Frank Drake (who served as the technical director), assembled in order to present “strange new civilizations” with evidence of our intelligence (this was, luckily for us, before we had recordings from this year’s elections). Now, 40 years later, a trio of enterprising (sorry) entrepreneurs, including noted album cover designer Lawrence Azerrad, have teamed with Ozma Records to embark on a Kickstarter-based project that will produce, for us mortals, a package we can own and treasure that is being called the record’s 40th Anniversary Edition.

Supporting the project at the $98 level entitles you to what’s called the “Voyager Golden Record Box Set” which includes, according to the project’s Kickstarter page, a cloth-covered box with gold foil inlay, three translucent gold, heavyweight vinyl LPs in poly-lined paper sleeves, three old-style tip-on jackets (black ink and gold foil), a hardback full-color book, a 12″ x 12″ lithograph of the Voyager Golden Record cover diagram (printed in gold metallic ink on archival paper), a full-color plastic digital download card that includes all audio from the Voyager Golden Record (MP3 or FLAC formats) and, recently added, a high-quality enamel pin of the Golden Record diagram and a custom turntable slipmat featuring NASA/JPL-Caltech’s heliocentric view of the Voyager spacecrafts’ trajectories across the solar system. Supporting the project at lower levels also entitles you to items including the pin, the download card and/or the litho, so if you’d like to learn more about the project and reserve one for yourself (I did!), click on over to https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/ozmarecords/voyager-golden-record-40th-anniversary-edition

The folks from the record label have also posted a recent BBC interview (on Soundcloud) with the original designer of the Golden Record – Jon Lomberg – which you can listen to via this link – https://soundcloud.com/user-482195982/interview-with-jon-lomberg?

b) It’s been weeks since we’ve seen a tribute to David Bowie’s impact on the entertainment world, but after reading this recent posting by Jacob Brookman for the British Journal of Photography’s site titled “Deconstructing The Iconography Of David Bowie”, one built around his research and discussions with people there to document the musician/actor/artist’s various transformations over the years, I thought that it’d be a good way to fire up your end-of-the-week brain cells before your weekend activities thoroughly left you in mindless states. You’ll learn more from Bowie insider Mick Rock, whose book The Rise of David Bowie, 1972-1973 serves to give us a unique view of an artist just starting up the ultimately huge curve of his influence on music, fashion, sexual identity and Pop Culture in general. They were young, influential and, quite evidently, taking large quantities of banned substances but, oh the artwork they produced…

http://www.bjp-online.com/2016/09/deconstructing-the-iconography-of-david-bowie/

c) As a lead in to a promo for the newly-released edition of one of the more-comprehensive album art books available to fans of the category (i.e., The Greatest Album Covers Of All Time, produced by music writers Barry Miles and Johnny Morgan and art director Grant Scott and discussed in detail in the previous section), The Telegraph (U.K.)’s music critic, Neil McCormick, asks and attempts to answer the question “Did Digital Kill The Album Sleeve” – reminisces about stand out work over the past 60+ years in various categories, citing examples of works he liked in each (Sgt. Peppers, The Basement Tapes by Dylan & The Band, London Calling by The Clash, etc.) but then, without providing us with a “why”, he goes on to lament that ” the golden era of album art is long gone and, despite the many benefits of digital music, something important has been lost”, completing his thought by stating that “… the finest (musicians and album art producers) feed off each other to create something that could belong in a museum as much as on a turntable. And a museum, sadly, is where album cover art is heading…”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/what-to-listen-to/from-david-bowie-to-pink-floyd-the-lost-art-of-the-album-cover/

d) During the recent New York Art Book Fair in NYC, the famed Gagosian Gallery hosted a rather unique activity (for a book fair, that is) in their display space at the Museum of Modern Art’s PS1 space – a completely-operational tattoo parlor, offering specially-commissioned designs from a slate of established artists, including one each from two figures well-known in the music world – Genesis Bayer P-Orridge, whose album cover credits include Psychic TV’s Tekno Acid Beat; City Ov Paris and Cold Blue Torch for The Origin Of The Species; Prurient’s Wrapped In The Flame Of Illusion, Masked In The Clay Of Behavior and the artist’s own recording (Spatial Memory); and Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon. Music fans may not be aware of Gordon’s background in the visual arts – a graduate of LA’s Otis College of Art & Design, Gordon worked as a art writer, gallery curator and a popular fine artist, creating multi-media works that often combined visuals and live music. Books built around her work as an artist include 2005’s a personal photo collection titled Kim Gordon Chronicles Vol. 1 and 2006’s Kim Gordon Chronicles Vol. 2which featured her drawings, collages, and paintings. Gagosian hosted a show at their gallery in London of her work in 2013 called “The Show Is Over” – a fitting title considering that her band broke up in 2011 after 30 years together… Artsy’s Casey Lesser shares the details around the tattoo event in her recent article – https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-limited-edition-art-meets-skin-at-gagosian-s-tattoo-parlor

e) Previously posted as a “quickie” news update on 9/22/16 – The designer for the record packaging for one of the recent past’s most-memorably-titled albums – Evan Christ’s 2011 release Everything Is Boring & Everyone Is A F__king Liar – spoke to attendees at the Cover Club’s September 23rd get-together at the Ace Hotel in London. Graphic artist David Rudnick (not to be confused with hardcore American punk rocker David Rudnik of Kungfu Rick and Get Rad fame) lead a discussion during which, according to the event’s promo, he discussed “his experiences creating covers for labels such as Man Make Music Phantasy and Boysnoize Records, his creative process and approach to working in the industry.”

https://www.acehotel.com/calendar/london/cover-club-presents-conversation-david-rudnick?ct=t(dr_cover_club9_5_2016)

Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/events/317714025230817/?active_tab=highlights

You can learn more about Mr. Rudnick and his work on his web site at http://davidrudnick.org/

f) When the brand name for an item (e.g., Xerox or Kleenex) or activity (Googling) becomes mainstream, marketers can pat themselves on the back for having reached the pinnacle of their professions. Such is also the case with “Sleeveface”, an activity formally introduced back in 2007 by John Rostron and Carl Morris in the U.K. where participants submit photos where one key element within the shot is built around an LP cover image. The duo went on to host a popular site and publish a book of their favorite examples of creative “sleevefacing” and, nearly 10 years later, the activity continues to attract more creative types to show us their most-imaginative work.

In a recent article by Daniel Peters for the Bandwagon site, you’ll meet a DJ from Singapore named Robin Chua (AKA “KiDG”) who has created a nice portfolio of these images and, in order to inspire others to join in, released a video guide showing how you can create your own masterpieces. Unfortunately, rights restrictions make it hard/impossible for those of us in the U.S. to see the video, but the article includes a number of photos of KiDG’s work and, of course, if my readers outside the U.S. would care to share what they see in the video with us, we can all be better-informed – https://www.bandwagon.asia/articles/sleeveface-or-bringing-your-vinyl-record-sleeves-to-life

g) After attending both the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design and the Maryland Institute College of Art in the early 1970s before dropping out to pursue his musical ambitions, David Byrne’s love of art and music remained strong (after all, he teamed up with fellow RISD student Chris Frantz and others to form the Talking Heads soon after) and he played a very hands-on role in the band’s album packaging/imagery going forward, with the band winning two Grammy Awards for “Best Album Art” (although they never won a Grammy for their music!) and collections of his own artwork later being featured in books and museum/gallery exhibitions.

Byrne has also forged relationships with other notables in the art world throughout his career, so it was with great interest that I read this recent posting by editor Abigail Cain on the Artsy.com site about Byrne’s discovery of the trend-setting works by Robert Rauschenberg and then collaborating with the artist on a very special, limited-edition pressing of the band’s 1983 record Speaking In Tongues. While the retail version of the record featured a simple-yet-pleasing design by Bryne himself, one of the limited-edition (1000 copies) versions – hand-signed by both Byrne and Rauschenberg and which sold for $100 – quickly became a must-have collectible. You can read all of the details via the link –https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-the-story-behind-robert-rauschenberg-s-iconic-talking-heads-album-cover?

A recent check on Ebay finds one of these available for only $4999.00…

h) My old friend and hip-hop founding father Rocky Bucano sent out an email on September 8th that I wanted to share with you all as I am a believer in his cause (setting up an institution – the Universal Hip Hop Museum – that will provide a proper home/platform for the preservation and sharing of the history, including an impressive and impactful one in graphic design and photography, of this truly American music genre. As Rocky puts it, “this has been an amazing year for development of the Universal Hip Hop Museum because of the support of our partners, advisors, board members, staff and supporters around the world. The Universal Hip Hop Museum has moved from a grand idea, to a viable concept, and now to a real business with an important mission that has been embraced by Hip Hop pioneers, collectors, business leaders, politicians, developers etc. ”

Rocky continues – “Yesterday, Forbes Magazine published the annual “Cash Kings” list of Hip Hop’s richest artists. A special documentary Bronx To Billions – Forbes Guide To Hip Hop History was produced by Zack Greenburg and Timothy Pierson to spotlight the role of the Bronx and its Hip Hop pioneers who were instrumental in giving birth to the world’s most popular music and culture.  The documentary emphasizes the importance and reasons for the establishment of a cultural institution and repository that is dedicated to documenting, preserving and celebrating the history of Hip Hop…  I invite you to watch the Forbes documentary Bronx to Billions and offer your support of the Universal Hip Hop Museum with a monetary contribution and by sharing this film with other people to make them aware of the UHHM mission.”

You can watch the film online via the link – http://youtu.be/sTzy3cjj0l4 – and be sure to subscribe to the UHHM video channel.  As I’ve shared with you in previous coverage of Rocky’s efforts to establish a Hip Hop museum in the Bronx, NY within the next few years (and, in the effort, help transform the area’s economy)  Also according to Rocky, “several major announcements will be made next month about new partnerships and exciting development plans for the museum,” so I’ll be sure to share them as they become available. In the meantime, you can visit his site at www.uhhm.org or follow them in the Twitterverse at  @uhhmuseum

i) It’s just smart marketing, if you ask me…Home lifestyle/furnishings retailer Crate & Barrel has just announced a new collection – furniture, shelving and related items – that seem perfectly-targeted a we old-timers who once had a special “listening room” where we’d shelve, protect and enjoy our vinyl LP collections. While video-focused “home theaters” have replaced the music rooms of the past, the resurgence of the popularity among some of a more-passive listening/enjoying experience can now be accommodated via this offering called, appropriately, “The Listening Room”. Not only can you buy some comfy chairs and sturdy shelving, but you can also add to your collections by selecting one of the 75 remastered vinyl records from Capital Records (from Sinatra and Garland to Sam Smith and Katy Perry) priced from $19.95 to $24.95 and play them on/through the $379.00 Orbit Turntable/pre-amp coupled to your choice of a $249.00 pair of Audioengine speakers or a $299.00 set of Bowers & Wilkins (B&W) wireless headphones. Of course, no setting would be complete without a small grouping of nicely-framed album covers and, as you might figure, C&B offers two nice frames for your 12 x 12 works of art.

I particularly like the grouping shown on http://www.crateandbarrel.com/decorating-and-accessories/turntable-accessories/1 (Beatles, Beach Boys, Nora Jones, etc.) and the nice-looking cordial set nearby (a requirement for serious listening). See more of the collection at http://www.crateandbarrel.com/special-features/music-listening-room/1

j) Nominees were just announced for the talent to be considered in one of the six categories (architecture, digital, fashion, graphics, product and transport) featured in the 9th annual Beazley Designs of the Year awards sponsored by The Design Museum in London, UK, with one of the nominees in the graphics category being designer Jonathan Barnbrook’s iridescent cover for what turned out to be the final album released by the late David Bowie, titled Blackstar.

According to the museum’s press on the nominations, the “Beazley Designs of the Year celebrates design that promotes or delivers change, enables access, extends design practice or captures the spirit of the year.”

In a year where we’re seeing corporate sponsorship re-labeling stadiums/events in ways that some would consider  “not quite right” (e.g., the new name for Sox Park in Chicago becoming “Guaranteed Rate Field”, just one degree less silly than Save-On Foods Stadium in Vancouver or KFC Yum! Center in Kentucky), of course I was curious as to who “Beazley” was. It turns out to be a large, multi-faceted insurance company who, according to their CEO Andrew Horton, chose to claim naming rights to this competition “to celebrate the role that great design plays in all our lives. At Beazley, we are committed to offering beautifully designed insurance to our clients around the world.” Whoo boy.

Read more about this year’s awards in Elizabeth Roberts’ recent posting on the MailOnline.com site – http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3767120/David-Bowie-s-final-album-cover-joins-flat-pack-refugee-shelters-drinkable-book-shortlist-year-s-Design-Awards.html   and, to see and learn more about all of the nominees, click on over to the museum’s site at https://designmuseum.org/exhibitions/future-exhibitions/beazley-designs-of-the-year

That’s all for now – look for updates every week (typically, on a Friday) on our news feed –https://www.facebook.com/AlbumCoverHallOfFame – we’ll be back early next month with another summary for you.

All text Copyright 2016 Mike Goldstein and AlbumCoverHallofFame.com – All Rights Reserved. All of trade names mentioned in these summaries are the properties of their respective owners and are used for reference only.

Album Cover News Summary for July, 2016

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ALBUM COVER HALL OF FAME’S ALBUM COVER NEWS RECAP FOR THE MONTH OF JULY, 2016

By Mike Goldstein, AlbumCoverHallofFame.com

It’s the first day of August, 2016. What’s new, you might ask. Well, assuming that you’re not outdoors (too much sun) or aren’t taking shelter from freak storms (or from the gusts of hot air emanating from your TV sets these days), I’m thinking that you’re enjoying the summer overall and are sharing your love of whatever drives your passions with your friends and family. All of us lovers of album cover imagery are a bit of a family, wouldn’t you agree (albeit a sometimes-dysfunctional one, with yours truly as your “arty” Uncle Mike (and NOT your Wicked Uncle Ernie – apologies to all un-wicked Ernies).

In this month’s summary – continuing on in the new and much-appreciated “less talk, more info” format – the people that make our favorite album imagery continue to impress us fans, critics and other observers of the art form with their collective output, contributing to the ongoing stream of articles, interviews, info on museum and gallery shows and the like on a wide range of related topics:

1) Upcoming, recently-launched and just-closed show/exhibitions –

a) While the extremely-well-attended Ramones-centered art/memorabilia show at the Queens Museum may have closed this past weekend (July 31st), the kind folks at local public TV network WLIW/Channel 13 have posted a 7 minute video presentation on their Metrofocus web site – http://www.thirteen.org/metrofocus/2016/07/ramones-exhibit-rocks-queens/ – that includes a brief tour through the show, where you’ll see photos by George DuBose, Roberta Bayley and others (including various iterations of Arturo Vega’s iconic presidential seal-like logo for the band) along with interviews with Joey’s brother Mickey Leigh, Johnny’s widow Linda, the band’s former tour manager Monte Melnick and the exhibition’s curator, Marc Miller, a fellow with a long history of producing punk-based art/music shows. Hey ho, if you can’t go, watch the video…

b) Up for a brief run (mid-July through July 30th) at the Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery on the campus of Stony Brook University on Long Island, NY was an album art show featuring over 1000 record covers on loan from local collectors and the archives of the school’s own radio station (WUSB).

ON THE RECORD: ALBUM COVER ART was presented in conjunction with the Stony Brook Film Festival at the Staller Center for the Arts at Stony Brook University, a venue that has also hosted performances by many of the musical acts (including local talent such as Bob Dylan, Blue Oyster Cult, Cyndi Lauper, Lou Reed and others) whose record albums are on display in this show.

One of the people that curated the exhibition – Karen Levitov, the gallery’s Director – was kind enough to share some additional background info, exhibit details and some photos of the display with me, which I’ll now share with you – “Last summer we had a Vintage Film Poster show during the Film Festival that got a terrific response, so we wanted something just as fun and appealing this summer. Our campus radio station, WUSB 90.1 FM was relocating and packing up its vinyl archive, so we decided to collaborate with them to put this show together. The gallery has a playlist of songs from the albums in the gallery and a documentary video on album cover art…We have over 1000 albums:  811 album covers on the walls and in display cases, plus over 200 playable vinyl records in our listening lounge and children’s area.

Album cover artists represented in the show include famous graphic designers, photographers and artists including Andy Warhol, Shusei Nagaoka, Robert Rauschenberg, Damien Hirst, Brian Duffy, Irving Penn, Robert Mapplethorpe, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kehinde Wiley, Banksy and many more. Rare and unique albums include The Beatles’ Yesterday and Today with the original cover known as the “butcher cover”; The Rolling Stones’ Their Satanic Majesties Request (with its 3D cover); John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s Two Virgins nude cover and The Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers cover by Andy Warhol  – with a real zipper!”

The festivities were kicked off with a special Q&A session with one of the founding members of Blue Oyster Cult, drummer Albert Bouchard, so if you missed the show, you can still learn more about it on the gallery’s site at http://zuccairegallery.stonybrook.edu/2016/07/on-the-record-album-cover-art/   

c) London’s Somerset House gallery is hosting an exhibition of art – both well-known and newly-created just for this show – inspired by the films of director Stanley Kubrick (from now until August 24th, sponsored by Canon). Included in the show’s display catalog are several works and work-related materials produced by airbrush artist Philip Castle, creator of memorable imagery for album covers and promotional efforts for artists including David Bowie, Pulp, Sir Paul McCartney, Metronomy and The Cars (see the item in Section 2, below, regarding a profile on the artist and his work). More info on the show is available online at http://www.somersethouse.org.uk/visual-arts/daydreaming-with-stanley-kubrick

d) In late 1950s – early 1960s London, three upstart young photographers – Brian Duffy, David Bailey and Terence Donovan – were on hand to both document and participate first hand in the rapidly-modernizing changes in the fashion and entertainment scenes. In addition to capturing memorable portraits of stars who arose from within the scene – actors, designers, artists and musicians (you’ll recall Duffy’s shots of David Bowie, including the famous cover for his Aladdin Sane LP, along with Bailey’s psychedelic cover image for the Rolling Stones’ Goats Head Soup), it was arguably Donovan who presented the broadest portfolio of artistically-crafted photos (and, later on, videos), including some that served to help launch the careers of his subjects.

While Bailey and Duffy have had a number of books and museum/gallery shows chronicling their careers, it wasn’t until now that Donovan’s contributions have been given the honor of a major retrospective. Now running at the Photographers’ Gallery in London is a show presented in association with camera manufacturer Ricoh (running through September 25th) titled Terence Donovan: Speed of Light that will include, in addition to a stunning collection of photos, a nice collection of related materials, including contact sheets, notes, diaries, sketchbooks and many previously-unseen items.

The Telegraph‘s Robin Muir gives us a preview of the show, along with some background on the photographer whose subjects have included everyone from Twiggy to Yassir Arafat.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/photography/what-to-see/terence-donovan-the-man-who-launched-a-thousand-stars/

Find out more about the show at the gallery’s site – http://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/terence-donovan-speed-of-light-2

On a related note, being published immediately after this show closes is a new book of Donovan’s most-beautiful portraits titled, quite appropriately, Terence Donovan Portraits. The book’s authored by Philippe Garner, a Director and International Head of Photographs and of 20th Century Decorative Art & Design at the Christie’s  auction house. Released this month in Europe (and due to hit the streets in the U.S. on September 27th), the 176-page book is being published by Damiani, with more details available on the company’s web site – https://www.damianieditore.com/en-US/product/579

e) Just a reminder that the “Fine Art of Rock” exhibition – featuring the album cover works of Ernie Cefalu, Joe Garnett, Ingrid Haenke, Drew Struzan and the other talented artists that made up the roster of famed album art design studio Pacific Eye & Ear – launched in July at the Memphis Rock & Soul Museum for a run that will continue there through November 20th. On display will be original illustrations, paintings and working materials created for records by bands including Black Sabbath, Iron Butterfly, The Doors, Aerosmith, Grand Funk Railroad and many others. There’s a nice preview article by writer Bob Mehr that’s been posted on The Commercial Appeal: Memphis that also includes comments by Ernie – http://www.commercialappeal.com/entertainment/music/features/the-fine-art-of-rock-pays-tribute-to-album-cover-images-at-memphis-rock-n-soul-museum-376179b5-0e8b–386706541.html and for more info about the venue, click on over to their web site at http://memphisrocknsoul.org/

On a related note – The folks at the Memphis Rock & Soul Museum recently alerted me about a selection of photos posted on the Facebook page of classic rock aficionado John Gable taken during his visit to the Fine Art of Rock exhibition currently on display at the museum, so if you’d like to take a brief tour of some of the notable album art on display there, click on over to John’s gallery at https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206818128717266&set=pcb.10206818132277355&type=3&theater

f) Designer/blogger extraordinaire Simon Robinson recently posted an article on his ST33 site that introduces readers to a new exhibition which launched on the 14th of July that includes a display of over 500 album covers created for musical acts of the Jewish faith – in a wide variety of musical styles – that is currently on display at the Jewish Museum in London, UK. According to the museum’s site, the show – titled “Jukebox, Jewkbox! A Century on Shellac and Vinyl” (gotta love the name, no?) celebrates “the history of Jewish inventors, musicians, composers, music producers and songwriters.”

In addition to being able to view examples of early phonographs and gramophone (which, by the way, was invented and patented, along with the first phonograph record, in 1887 by Emil Berliner, a German-Jewish immigrant to the USA), visitors can track the growth of recorded music through the 20th Century to the present, “from Jewish folk music to Yiddish theatre songs, from Broadway musicals to rock‘n’roll via the rebels of punk and psychedelic rock. Hear personal stories from artists, musicians and collectors. Explore the art of the record sleeve and enjoy a display of 500 records including iconic sleeves from Amy Winehouse, the Ramones, Bob Dylan, and Barbara Streisand.” The show runs through October 16th.

Read Simon’s intro to this interesting, historic display on his site at https://st33.wordpress.com/

More info on the show is also available on the museum’s site at http://www.jewishmuseum.org.uk/jukebox

g) Billboard Magazine contributor Gail Mitchell just posted an intro article about the newest exhibition that just launched at the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles that should be a treat for Beatles fans. This show, curated by the Grammy Museum and Fab Four Exhibits, has been entertaining audiences all across the US since it opened up in NYC in 2014 (setting attendance records wherever it stopped), has now “come home” to the LA-based museum and will be appearing there through September 5th.

According to the museum’s press, “Ladies and Gentlemen…The Beatles!” brings us back to the early ‘60s when rock & roll was re-energized–some say saved–by four lads from Liverpool. The exhibit covers the period from early 1964 through mid-1966—the years Beatlemania ran rampant in America. During this time the band affected nearly every aspect of pop culture, including fashion, art, advertising, media, and, of course, music. On display are many Beatles-related pop culture artifacts from the period, as well as correspondence, instruments, posters, photographs, interviews, interactive displays, and an oral history booth in which visitors can leave their own impressions of The Beatles. Screenings and a series of talks reveal the continuing impact of the Beatles.”

Based on the show’s description and photos, there will be a lot of items on display that will be of interest to record art fans. Related events include one that vinyl lovers will have enjoyed – a specially-produced “Record Theater” event on July 18th which featured the music from the band’s 1966 release Revolver – the record featuring Klaus Voorman’s fantastic psychedelic ink drawing on the cover.

To read Gail’s article online, click on over to the Billboard site – http://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/pop/7431018/beatles-exhibit-grammy-museum

and, for more information on the show and all the related screenings, discussions and events, visit the museum site at

http://www.grammymuseum.org/exhibits/traveling-exhibits/ladies-and-gentlementhe-beatles

h) As part of the kick off festivities surrounding the “Chunk of Punk” photo exhibition which launched July 8th at the High Street Gallery at the Uncorked Wine Bar in Akron, OH (featuring the works of Jill Furmanovsky, album cover contributor extra-ordinaire), the Akron Art Museum hosted a special talk about the local rock music scene that featured both Ms. Furmanovsky and local music legend Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders. Chunk of Punk was part of Punk Week in Akron, which celebrates the genre via a series of events including concerts, film screenings and related displays of artistry. More on this event can be found on the Museum’s web site at

https://akronartmuseum.org/calendar/artist-talk-jill-furmanovsky-with-chrissie-hynde/10486

Up-to-the-minute updates of this exhibitions can be found on the gallery’s Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/22HighStreetGallery/

i) The Panopticon Gallery in Boston, MA has a new group photography show running now through September 13th that they’re calling Music To Our Ears and which features a fine collection of photographs – portraits, concert photography, etc. – by a dozen respected shooters including Charlie Sawyer, Roger Farrington, Marc Lacatell, Rowland Scherman and others, as well as shots from Ron Pownall, the man responsible for album package shots for a number of renowned musical acts including Joe Perry, Rick Derringer, Aerosmith, Ted Nugent, Rainbow and many others.

According to the gallery’s site, the exhibition will also include “some music posters courtesy of our friends at the International Poster Gallery and some new guitars by Booches Custom Guitars.”

Prior to the launching of this event, Pownall was interviewed by Jody Feinberg for the Abington Wicked Local web site – http://abington.wickedlocal.com/entertainment/20160610/rock-n-roll-photography-on-display-at-cohasset-arts-event    There, you’ll learn about highlights from Ron’s career, including a photo taken in 1976 capturing the then 19-year-old Charlie Baker – now the Governor of Massachusetts – at an Aerosmith concert in Providence…

2) Artist interviews/profile articles –

a) 20 years ago, a young photographer named Jonathan Mannion was hired by Rocafella Records to shoot a photo for the cover of the debut record (titled Reasonable Doubt) by a rapper named Shawn Carter who was looking for someone who’d present him to new audiences as someone who’d already established himself as the best in his profession. Shawn Carter went on to become music mogul Jay-Z and, as part of the festivities held to celebrate the record’s 20th anniversary, Mannion’s intimate photos from that session were presented in a “pop-up” exhibition called, quite reasonably, “PROPHECY”. A total of 22 images were shown at the private event – Vibe‘s Josias Valdez was on the guest list, talked to Mannion about how everything came together then and what’s next in this nicely-crafted illustrated interview – http://www.vibe.com/2016/07/jonathan-mannion-interview/

Just received an email from Mr. Mannion in which he details some of the latest things he’s been working on, including album covers for 2 Chains (College Grove), Dj Khaled (Major Key) and Gucci Mane (GUWOP). He’s also just teamed with  retailer PINTRILL to release a series of pins based on album art images Mannion’s done for Jay-Z, including some that celebrate the anniversary of their working together on Reasonable Doubthttp://www.pintrill.com/products/mannion-pin-pack?variant=21301575300

b) Houston-based artist Kevin Peterson received a call from someone on April Fool’s Day saying that they wanted to use a painting of his on the upcoming Red Hot Chili Peppers’ record The Getaway. Of course he thought it was a joke…that was, until he was assured that front man Anthony Keidis had seen the work – an ultra-realistic painting titled “Coalition II” of a young girl strolling down a graffiti-marked street along with a bear, a raccoon, a fox and a black bird – and felt that it would perfectly-represent (according to Patrick Flanary’s interview with Peterson recently posted on the Billboard.com web site – http://www.billboard.com/articles/news/7408793/red-hot-chili-peppers-album-cover-choice) “the strength that it takes growing up in the world today, those traumas that it takes to get through it, and to survive and thrive.” Like Keidis, Peterson is a recovering drug user himself who found a new beginning in the Arts, so there’s some poetic justice in how the two found each other for this project.

c) After meeting artist Andy Warhol in the late 1950s while he worked as a waiter in a NYC restaurant (to supplement his starving artist career at the time), the two formed a tight bond that ultimately led to both a romantic and creative relationship that would last 10 years and out of which would spring “The Factory”, a place where strange and wonderful things took place. That person – Billy Name (originally, William Linich, Jr. ), one of the last few of the original cast of characters who called The Factory home, died recently at the age of 76.

While he spent the rest of his life post-Factory as a poet, Name’s photographs were included on the famous packaging for The Velvet Underground and Nico (the band’s  Warhol-produced debut album, as well as their self-titled third record, where he’s also a character who knows right from wrong (“…But, Billy said, both those words are dead”) in the group’s  song from that record called “That’s the Story of My Life”.

You can read Name’s obituary in The Guardian via the link – https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/jul/18/billy-name-andy-warhol-factory-photographer-dies-76

d) Man Booker Prize-winning author Marlon James – best-known for his 2015 novel A Brief History of Seven Killings – is featured in a recent interview with Jason Parham on TheFader.com site in which he recounts his earlier career as Creative Director (and album art producer) for top-selling Jamaican musician/recording artist Sean Paul. The two attended the same college in Jamaica before meeting professionally via Sean Paul’s manager in 1999 (while James worked as an independent writer/designer for commercial clients) to collaborate on the musician’s Stage One record. In the interview, you’ll learn more about James’ influences (Bjork and Pen & Pixel – quite the range!) and some additional details on several of the other covers he created for his famed fellow alum –

http://www.thefader.com/2016/07/12/sean-paul-album-covers-marlon-james

e) See item in Section 4 about a recent interview in The Guardian with acclaimed artist/musician Klaus Voorman’s regarding his just-released graphic novel about his time with The Beatles.

f) Interesting profile of artist Philip Castle in a recent posting on The Guardian‘s site by reporter Jonathan Jones. Album art fans will recall Castle’s contribution to the cover art featuring Brian Duffy’s memorable photo of David Bowie found on the Aladdin Sane LP (Castle created the silver teardrop found on Bowie’s shoulder, while film poster fans will recall his campy artwork crafted for Tim Burton’s Mars Attacks. While both of those efforts earned Castle many fans in the entertainment world, it was his artwork for Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 futuristic crime masterpiece A Clockwork Orange – now included in a show at London’s Somerset House gallery called “Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick” – that cemented his place in Pop Culture history. Kubrick’s very hands-on, detail-oriented work ethic had him send Castle art and sculptures used in the film for use in his prep for the poster work (leaving him with great souvenirs!), and Castle would go on to work with Kubrick again on the art for his celebrated war feature Full Metal Jacket. Read all the details via the link at https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/jul/07/stanley-kubrick-and-me-designing-clockwork-orange-poster

For some additional insight into this artist and, in particular, his album cover artwork, you might also want to spend a few minutes watching this 2011 video interview with London-based photographer Steve Mepsted posted on YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbEAb2HoLVc

g) Another “local boy done good” feature was recently posted on the Somerset Live (UK) site that reminds us of the great talent of fantasy artist Rodney Matthews, who recently licensed one of his works for use on the cover of the latest compilation record by the Rolling Stones (Another Time, Another Place II). Matthews’ art has been featured on scores of books, posters and a number of album covers, including those for Asia, Hawkwind, Barclay James Harvest, Nazareth, The Scorpions, Thin Lizzy, Uriah Heep and Rick Wakeman, but in this case, it was an image he’d done 40+ years ago while working for the famed Big O poster house – one that had caught the eyes of the Stones’ production team and, miraculously, ended up being used – without Matthews’ consent – on a U.S. tour poster for the band that the new record’s publisher requested be used on the recent release – this time, with credit and, I’m assuming, some compensation. Good work always wins out in the end…

http://www.somersetlive.co.uk/8203-paulton-artist-designsthe-rolling-stones-album-cover/story-29453182-detail/story.html

h) When two collaborators in music both hold degrees from Boston’s School of the Museum of Fine Arts, you’d have to think that they’d be looking for just the right images to grace the covers of their records and, in the case of the band Quilt and co-founding members Shane Butler and Anna Fox Rochinski, you’d be right! For the cover of their 2016 release Plaza, after they came upon an image of a 1992 illustration by the late artist Ken Price (who also provided the cover art for The Paperhead’s 2014 release titled Africa Avenue) and realized that the artwork would be perfect for their upcoming record, they contacted the artist’s estate (managed by his son Jackson), made an impassioned plea for a license, and were rewarded with the permission they sought.

In Katherine Turman’s recent article for The Village Voice, you’ll meet these two talented young people and learn more about their ongoing efforts to “stitch together music and visual art”, much to the pleasure of their fans – http://www.villagevoice.com/music/perfect-cover-for-their-latest-album-quilt-stitch-together-music-and-visual-art-8768833

i) The works of legendary hip-hop photo specialist Ernie Paniccioli were featured recently in a rather-cool new project launched in Edmonton, Canada called the “Knowledge is Pow Wow” (which according to the project’s site, “will explore religious pluralism and social justice through inclusive conversation and creative expression …young adults from Edmonton’s downtown communities will hear from leaders representing Indigenous, Catholic, Jewish and Muslim faiths and culture.”). Paniccioli, a Cree Native American who grew up in Brooklyn, NY, got his start in photography in the streets of his neighborhood, capturing images of the graffiti culture that reigned in the 1970s. His images got him a lot of attention, particularly from the artists in the emerging hip-hop/rap music scenes there and he was asked by a number of the soon-to-be-stars of the time – Queen Latifah, Public Enemy, Snoop Dogg, Jay-Z and many others – to provide them with shots for their album packages and promotions.

For an interview with Ernie done prior to the exhibition that was posted recently on the CBC News web site, click on over to http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/famed-cree-hip-hop-photographer-s-work-on-display-in-edmonton-1.3652907

j) One of the design groups most-responsible for the over-the-top, bling-filled covers found on many of the rap genre’s best-known acts of the 1990s – 2000s was a Houston-based firm called Pen & Pixel, founded by two brothers (Aaron and Shaun Brauch) and whose work was featured on three-quarters of a billion albums, including 38 gold and 12 platinum-selling discs. The firm grew quickly and expanded their client list to include mainstream musical acts including Cher, Destiny’s Child, Lyle Lovett, Chris Rock and ZZ Top only to become victims of the many changes that rocked the music business, with the brothers leaving to start other careers – Aaron as a serial entrepreneur and business development consultant while Shaun continued on as an executive/creative director for several creative services companies.

New York Times contributor Will Stephenson recently posted a “Letter Of Recommendation” article that chronicles the firm’s rise and fall and how their designs established – at least for a while – the design guide for the proper proportions of cars, jewelry, money and scantily-clad women that should appear on any self-respecting rapper’s latest release.  http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/10/magazine/letter-of-recommendation-pen-pixel.html?

k) Not sure how I missed this when it aired a couple of months back, but Rene Montagne of NPR Radio’s “Morning Edition” did a very nice interview with one of the best-known artists to work in the Bay Area since the mid-1960s – that being, Wes Wilson, the guy credited with crafting the trippy, balloon-y fonts that became a mainstay of gig poster designs from that era (he’s also applied his talents to album art of the day, most-notably on the cover for Cream’s Disraeli Gears LP). Samples of Wilson’s posters were included in the grand re-opening exhibitions staged when the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art threw open its doors after a major renovation and there are more examples of his work in the museum’s permanent collection – https://www.sfmoma.org/artist/Wes_Wilson

Listen to Wilson as he recalls how and why he got into the field, what motivated and shaped his work and how he hoped that his works would show, during the time when the war in Vietnam was raging, that “things are going to get better”. http://www.npr.org/2016/05/13/477900499/psychedelic-font-how-wes-wilson-turned-hippie-era-turmoil-into-art?

l) One of the most-impressive gallery collections of rock music-related fine art prints I’ve had the pleasure of seeing was on display at the San Francisco Art Exchange and, during my last visit, I had the pleasure of meeting the staff there, including the co-owner, Theron Kabrich. For those who haven’t seen the gallery’s collection (available online on their site at www.sfae.com), you’ll find editioned prints by many of the masters of album cover imagery, including designers Roger Dean and Storm Thorgerson and photographers Joel Brodsky, Elliott Landy, Gered Mankowitz, Mick Rock and others – usually presented in collections that will appeal to lovers of the imagery of rock’s foremost musical acts.

In his most-recent “Art Dealer Show” audio interview/podcast, art world veteran Danny Stern (who got his first gallery job at SFAE) talks to his mentor Kabrich about his start in the business – having transitioned from a career in the fields of psychology and mental health to his career in the art world after, according to his site bio ” he had traveled throughout Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, Nepal and India, collecting art and objects along the way. This set a new chapter in motion from a career in clinical psychology to one as a fine art dealer.” Today, along with his co-owner Jim Hartley, Kabrich presents his gallery’s clients with fine examples of the works of the people that have produced many of the world’s best-known images from the world of Popular Culture, so it’s a rare opportunity to be able to listen to him discuss a whole range of topics with his learned cohort.

The 67-minute-long podcast is available via streaming/download, etc. – http://artdealer.show/004-theron-kabrich/

m) Ask six designers about their favorite/most-inspirational album cover designs and, of course, you get six completely-different stories, but in this recent article on The Guardian (UK) site built around interviews by Kathryn Bromwich, Imogen Carter and Katie Forster, I was particularly-intrigued by the appearance of several “classic” record covers in the answers proffered by some of these young-but-talented design pros. Included in the list of influential designs are covers by bands such as Sparks (their 1975 record Indiscreet is a favorite of Bedwyr Williams), The Human League (Inspiration, their 1979 record which profoundly impressed Julie Verhoeven) and Pink Floyd, whose 1969 record Ummagumma suggests the compositions of the Dutch Masters to Alice Anderson.

Always interesting to learn more about what goes on in the heads of today’s most-creative designers, I think…

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/jun/26/art-on-your-sleeve-artists-album-covers-juergen-teller-lynette-yiadom-boakye

n) Orange County, CA has produced a staggering number of talented people who’ve left their marks on the entertainment business – Steve Martin, Bob Deal (AKA Mick Mars) of Motley Crew and Gwen Stefani are just a few we can mention – but few have contributed as influential and long-lasting an item as the logo design created by Westminster High School graduate Gerard Huerta – that being the AC/DC lettering and logo that has graced the covers, sleeves, t-shirts, tattoos, posters and other memorabilia purchased by millions of fans since its introduction in 1976. Huerta began his career at CBS Records in New York designing album covers and creating letterforms for Boston (see the article on this cover later on in this posting), AC/DC, Ted Nugent, Blue Oyster Cult, Stephen Stills and Foreigner. He started Gerard Huerta Design in 1976 and has been drawing custom letters and logos ever since.

OC Register staff writer Peter Larsen recently posted a profile on the ever-busy artist at http://www.ocregister.com/articles/huerta-720158-westminster-lettering.html

I had the pleasure of interviewing Gerard several years back about his work on that iconic logo and so I invite you to take a gander at that article on my old archive site –

http://rockpopgallery.typepad.com/rockpop_gallery_news/2007/07/cover-story—a.html

o) Record covers have always reflected the fashions of the day, so leave it to the writers from Vogue Magazine to track down and interview a person that many of us classic album art fans know, but only from the waist down to his knees! Of course, I’m talking about Corey Grant Tippin – make-up artist, model, actor and Andy Warhol muse/chum, whose mid-section was featured prominently on the un-zippable album cover created for the Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers record, released in 1971.

In this article by Laird Borrelli-Persson that serves to introduce the relationship between Tippin and famed 70s illustrator Antonio Lopez (whose works are the subject of a new show on display at the new El Museo del Barrio “Antonio Lopez: Future Funk Fashion”), the interviewer questions Tippin about Lopez, his career as an in-demand make-up artist and working with Warhol and the team that created the acclaimed and controversial record cover –

http://www.vogue.com/13448063/corey-grant-tippin-interview-antonio-lopez-andy-warhol-sticky-fingers/

p) Writer Vikki Tobak’s new interview series for the Mass Appeal web site launches with an interview with one of the best-known photographers who has covered emerging music scenes over the past several decades – Janette Beckman. Ms. Beckman’s credits in the album art world include cover shots for The Police (Outlandos D’Amour, Reggatta De Blanc, Zenyatta Mondatta and Every Breath You Take: The Singles); Squeeze (Six Of One); Gang Starr (No More Mr. Nice Guy); Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five (On The Strength) and Salt-n-Pepa’s A Salt With A Deadly Pepa and Push It, among others, as well as the subject of this recent interview – an iconic image taken of British rapper Slick Rick during a Def Jam press shoot in NYC for The Great Adventures of Slick Rick album in 1989.

The interview dives into “the making of” this and other shots from her career and provides camera nerds with the details of the equipment she employed to make the magic happen – http://massappeal.com/contact-high-the-stories-behind-hip-hops-most-iconic-photographs/

3) Sales/Auctions –

a) St. Paul’s Gallery, one of the premiere publishers/galleries that specialize in album cover art prints, just informed me of a sale they’re running in conjunction of the recent opening of the world-traveling “Bowie Is” exhibition at the MAMbo – Museo d’Arte Moderna di Bologna – in Spain (see http://davidbowieis.it/en/ for more details). From now until this Friday, August 5th, the nice people at St. Paul’s are offering a 10% discount (via the promo code LIDNI231 entered at check-out) on any of the fine Bowie-related art prints they have available, including prints (some of which have copies also on display as part of the Bowie Is show, organized by the V&A Museum) by acclaimed artists/photographers such as John Rowlands, Celia Philo & Philip Castle, Terry Pastor and others. Some of the prints were co-signed by Mr. Bowie prior to his sad death this past January, making them all the more collectible. To see the entire offering (prints, limited-edition books, posters, sculpture, etc.), follow the link to the gallery’s site – http://www.stpaulsgallery.com/prodtype.asp?strParents=&CAT_ID=264&numRecordPosition=1

b) The team at Gotta Have It Rock & Roll auction house have just released a summary of the prices paid for items that were included their recently-held auction, with bidding closed on Saturday, July 30th. Fans of unique, album art-related items will find several examples of items that found new homes with collectors who participated in the “Rock and Pop Culture Auction – July 2016” event, including several groups of photos of the late artist formerly known as Prince (each of the three sets sold for a mere $100) and an abstract painting done by singer Alanis Morissette, which sold for $5363, well above the $4000 top pre-auction estimate.

Collectors seemed to be holding on tight to their purses/wallets as many items went unsold, including a set of photo proofs/negatives done for records by Steven Van Zant, artwork for Journey’s Time 3 box set (autographed by singer Steve Perry), a pair of photos offered up by the estate of Herb Worthington that were used on covers for Fleetwood Mac and Lita Ford (although, a Worthington-owned RIAA Platinum LP plaque for Stevie Nicks’ Bella Donna did sell for $587, near the top of the estimated value range) and an art board featuring a 16 x 20″ Neal Preston photo shot for the cover of Bruce Springsteen’s Live 75 – 85 record album. If you’d like to see more of the results, click on over to https://www.gottahaverockandroll.com/Category/Artwork-206.html   Congratulations to all who found something nice to add to their personal collections.

c) Lovers of the artwork of the late Rick Griffin were in for a treat this past month with the announcement of a special auction of his works hosted by the Psychedelic Art Exchange. Griffin, who created the now-famous artwork for the cover of the Grateful Dead’s trippy 1969 album AOXOMOXOA, along with covers for musical acts including Kerry Livgren, Cold Blood, MAN, The Packards, Darrell Mansfield and others, was also a celebrated poster artist, creating hundreds of designs for acts playing at Bay-area venues. In the late 1960s, Griffin teamed up with several other celebrated local artists, including Alton Kelley, Stanley Mouse, Victor Moscoso and Wes Wilson to start an agency specializing in psychedelic posters called Berkeley Bonaparte and, in the list of over 100 posters that were included in this auction, you’d have found wonderful examples of this work, along with images he created for his other loves, such as surfing, comic books and religion.

Take a look at what curator Glen Trosch has put together for you to look at in this month’s new auction and, if you’re so inclined, add to your collections, via the link – http://auctions.concertpostergallery.com

4) New Print/Book Publishing –

a) There’s a new Klaus Voorman book (a graphic novel) that tells the story of his relationship with The Beatles beginning with his first encounter with the group in 1960 in a Hamburg, Germany bar. Birth of an Icon: Revolver 50 includes the story about his Grammy-winning illustrations done for the cover of Revolver for The Beatles. In a recent interview with Robin Stummer for The Guardian web site, Voorman shares some of his recollections (“I created the Revolver cover. It was on the third floor of a house, in a little attic apartment, it was in the kitchen. Parliament Hill, Hampstead. I was staying there. I went back there recently, the building is exactly the same.”) which remain quite vivid even after all these years.

Trained as both a graphic artist and a musician, Voormann and his girlfriend, the photographer Astrid Kirchherr, met the band early in their career (the Pete Best/Stu Sutcliffe days) and inspired their looks at the time (black clothes, leathers and low-cut bangs). Astrid spent hours shooting the band (some of her best-known shots were used on the album packages for the band and several solo LPs, including George Harrison’s Wonderwall Music and John Lennon’s Signature Box compilation). Voormann went on to spend much of the 60s and 70s alternating stints on the pop and rock circuit, playing bass with Manfred Mann, George Harrison and John Lennon – including on Lennon’s Imagine – with his work in graphic design and fine art. Did covers for the Bee Gees (Bee Gees 1st and Idea, more for Beatles-related projects (inc. 1995’s Anthology compilation and Ringo’s Ringo), his own 2009 solo album A Sideman’s Journey (featuring guest appearances by former Beatles Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr, Yusuf Islam, Jim Keltner, Joe Walsh and others) and, more recently, a quite-Revolver-like illustration for the cover of Japanese rockers Glay’s 2014 release titled Music Life.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/jul/23/beatles-revolver-cover-klaus-voormann

Book info on Voorman’s site (set for an early August release) – http://www.voormann.com/shop/birth_of_an_icon_revolver_50

b) The works of one of the “Early Influencers” of record album artwork – artist David Stone Martin – have always intrigued fans of album art with their simple-yet-compelling lines and colors – just ask any fan of the many (over 400!) covers he created for records by acts including Count Basie, Charlie Parker, Joe Pass, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday and others who appeared on the several labels headed by the great jazz promoter Norman Granz (Asch, Clef and others) during the 1940s-50s. While some of the covers have been available previously as fine art prints, there’s a new, much-larger collection that’s being offered at the Modern Rocks Gallery in Austin, TX that comes from publisher Audioframe as the result of their pain-staking efforts to restore vintage plates and recreate the excitement of the original designs. Each print is hand-numbered and is stamped by DSM’s archive. There are 4 sizes available, in editions from 200 for the 14″ square prints, offered at $380, to just 25 prints in the huge 44″ square versions, priced at $1995. To see the entire collection, visit the Modern Rocks site at http://www.modernrocksgallery.com/buy-david-stone-martin-prints/

c) Tom Sheehan’s photos have been featured on hundreds of album covers and packages throughout the years (inc. those for the Flamin’ Groovies, Ian Dury, Aztec Camera, The Charlatans UK and others), but it is his photos of Robert Smith and his mates in The Cure – taken beginning in 1982 while he worked as the principal photographer for Melody Maker magazine – that are probably his best-known works, so it’s exciting to see a hand-picked selection of them taken over a 23-year period (thru 2005) compiled and offered in a soon-to-be-published new book. In Between Days. The Cure in photographs 1982 – 2005 is scheduled to be released this coming November in two beautiful editions – the Deluxe (2500 copies) and the Super Deluxe (just 700 copies) – each with 240 pages of photos and text, with the Super Deluxe version including a signed COA, a deluxe slipcover and an envelope containing three 5×7″ photos, suitable for framing. The Price for the Deluxe version is £48.00, while the Super Deluxe is available for £70.00, with pre-orders now being accepted on The Flood Gallery’s site at http://www.thefloodgallery.com/collections/the-cure-in-between-days?

d) The late Nirvana guitarist/songwriter Kurt Cobain showed a love for the visual arts by contributing album images for his band’s In Utero and Incesticide records, some of which will be on display as part of the recently-announced touring show of his art, organized by his family and Jampol Artist Management – https://news.artnet.com/art-world/kurt-cobain-art-exhibition-522386. Kurt’s visual arts genes live on in the artwork now being produced by his only child, the now 23-year-old Frances Bean Cobain, who has begun offering prints of her humorous-but-slightly-macabre artwork via the Depop online art store (https://www.depop.com/en-us/space_witch666). Ranging in price from $150 to $400 per print, the nine different images include, according to this recent article on the ArtNet site by Sarah Cascone, several works that were included in her first series released back in 2010 and illustrate that the young Ms. Cobain shares some of her Dad’s slightly-strange, dark humor…learn more via the link – https://news.artnet.com/art-world/frances-bean-cobain-art-for-sale-355262

e) Another reason to have braved the crowds at last month’s Comic-Con in San Diego is presented in this article by Ethan Anderton on the Slashfilm.com site about two sets of limited-edition items – one set of special-edition vinyl recordings and another set of related album cover art prints – featuring your favorite characters from one of last year’s most-successful animated films – Pixar Animation’s Inside Out. While supplies lasted at the show, festival goers were able to purchase 7″ vinyl copies of music taken from Michael Giacchino’s score for the film (not previously released on vinyl) that will be produced by specialty supplier Mondo in small batches (2500 copies in each) that feature both colored discs and artwork focused on one of the movie’s main characters (Joy, Sadness, Fear, Disgust, Anger and Riley). Also at the show, the first group of limited-edition (200 each out of 420 total per image) 18″ x 24″ prints of the albums’ different covers (done by the Toronto, Canada-based Phantom City Creative team, the same group that produced the stunning album art for Mondo’s soundtrack album for the Hannibal film soundtrack) were offered up by the folks at Cyclops Print Works, with the rest being made available by the publisher after the show.

To see all of the aforementioned art that’s available, link on over to the Slashfilm article now – http://www.slashfilm.com/inside-out-vinyl/

Visit the Cyclops Print Works site to get your own copy of one or more of these new collectibles – https://www.cyclopsprintworks.com/

You’ll find another Mondo-based article down in Section 5 that I’m sure you’ll enjoy as well…

f) Please see the article in Section 1 of this recap about the new book coming out featuring portrait photos by the great Terence Donovan – https://www.damianieditore.com/en-US/product/579

g) Photographer Drew Carolan, well-known for his compelling album cover photos featuring musical acts including Ziggy Marley, Eric B. & Rakim, Living Colour and many others, shared with me some information about a book he’s going to release this fall that should be of great interest to fans of the early 80s music scene as it transitioned from punk to the more hardcore styles. Over a two year period – from 1983 to 1985 – Drew set up shop near famed rock club CBGBs in the Bowery section of New York City to document – in an effort called the “Matinee Project” – the people who participated in the scene and attended the hardcore/metalcore events that were held nearby. Partnering with Radio Raheem Records (home of bands including Agnostic Front, Charred Remains, The Androids and other hardcore stalwarts), the deluxe hardcover book – titled Matinee: All Ages – On The Bowery NYC 1983 – 1985 is sure to please fans and those interested in seeing shots from this most-fascinating musical/pop culture era. Several years ago, Carolan created a video that highlights the time he spent creating this series which should serve as a great intro to his project – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jN46nf0nl0

To sign up for updates on the availability of this book, please visit http://www.radioraheemrecords.com/matineebook

h) While not easily falling in to this category’s basics (i.e., new prints, books and other arty collectibles), this item is of enough import that I felt it should be mentioned as it does involve collectibles of another type – i.e., postage stamps. On July 7th, the U.K.’s Royal Mail released a series of stamps that feature images connected to one of the nation’s best-known treasures, that being the rock band Pink Floyd. The collection of 10 different images gracing the new stamps include several of the band’s iconic album covers including early releases such as The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, Atom Heart Mother, The Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here and Animals, up to the group’s final 2014 release The Endless River. Four additional stamps feature photos of the band performing live on tour, including shots from concerts at London’s UFO Club in 1966, the Dark Side of the Moon tour in 1973, 1981’s The Wall tour and 1994’s The Division Bell tour.

Besides the stamps, there are a number of related items that are being promoted by the mail service, including souvenir sheets and presentation packs, framed collections, two cover collections, including one commemorating the 10th anniversary of the death of group founder Syd Barrett and a special numbered limited-edition item called a “Moon Maxi Sheet” that presents 10 of the Dark Side of the Moon stamps on top of a 9 x 7 replica of the renowned prismatic cover art.

As you might imagine, there has been a fair amount of coverage about this new collection, so if you’d like to learn more, click on over to this article on the BBC site – http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-36382247

or another example on the Belfast Telegraph site at http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/entertainment/music/news/pink-floyd-stamps-to-feature-innovative-album-covers-34747737.html

To see and buy these new items, pop on over to the Royal Mail site at http://www.royalmail.com/pinkfloydstamps

i) Comic book publisher Storm Entertainment has released a new comic novel that presents the life and times of the late artist Prince. Titled Tribute: Prince and penned by writer Michael L. Frizell, the comic book features artwork by Ernesto Lovera and Vincenzo Sansone. Lovera has previous credits doing artwork for tribute comics on other famous subjects, including Britain’s Royal Family, pin-up model Bettie Page and an earlier (2013) book on Prince titled Fame, while Sansone has done work on books about John Wayne and Pope Francis. Writer Frizell’s past comic book work covers famous figures in popular culture, politics and music, including books on Hillary Clinton, Jeb Bush, Nancy Reagan, Bono, Miley Cyrus, The Osbournes, Jerry Garcia and Amy Winehouse. Over the years, Storm Entertainment, formerly known as Blue Water Comics, has released a number of tribute comic book biographies, including ones on David Bowie, Kurt Cobain, Michael Jackson, John Lennon and many others.

Rolling Stone Magazine contributor Althea Legaspi provides us with additional details and comments from the creators of this 24-page tribute to another artist who has left this planet way too soon –  http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/tribute-prince-new-comic-book-released-20160609#

5) Other articles of interest –

a) Some of you might recall a posting some time back about a new “Floating Record” turntable I’d bought via a Kickstarter project in support of a Chicago company called Grammovox. As a Grammovox owner/supporter, I’ve been the recipient of a regular email newsletter in which they share info on new products (including a retro-style Bluetooth speaker) and on vinyl record products that, when mounted to be played on the vertically-oriented turntable, look extra cool – picture discs, colored vinyl and, in the case I’m sharing with you today, a series of records made by an artist named Curtis Godino that are filled with various liquids. Very lava-lamp visuals, you’d have to figure. Two notable commissions for Godino include “blood-filled” records for clients including Waxwork Records’ Friday The 13th soundtrack and Mondo’s soundtrack for the blood-drenched film ALIENS.

Grammovox staffers recently interviewed the Brooklyn, NY-based artist about the wide range of liquid disc projects – for both musical and fine art clients – for their blog titled The Reverb, which you can reach via the link at https://www.gramovox.com/blogs/posts/interview-with-curtis-godino?

b) Today’s second story about record releases with interesting delivery options shows us a new album titled Ecume on the AntiVJ label by Belgian record producer Thomas Vaquie’, who collaborated with the appropriately-named (for an album package designer) artist Yannick Jacquet (!!) to create a sleeve made of concrete cast resin that’s been inscribed with 3D representations of the waveforms of some of the album’s music. Writing for the Stoneyroads.com dance music web site, Joseph Smith gives us an overview of the limited-edition (25 sets) offering – priced at €90 (not including shipping!) – http://stoneyroads.com/2016/07/artist-creates-concrete-record-sleeve-for-album

c) Levi’s 505C jeans – whether you know it or not – have been featured on two of rock’s most-iconic album covers – Sticky Fingers by the Rolling Stones and the debut record by NY punk legends Ramones, and with retro styling having a bit of a comeback, the clothing company has decided to re-issue this series in order to fulfill the desires of punkers and Factory-wannabes of all ages to dress as their heroes did.

http://www.gq.com/story/levis-505c-new-style-archives-denim-jeans

d) R.I.P. cartoonist and illustrator Jack Davis, one of the founding editors of Mad Magazine, who died Wednesday at the age of 91. Over his long career, Davis gave us memorable images for a variety of book, magazine and commercial advertising clients (e.g., he designed the original bug that screamed “RAID!” on the bug spray commercials), but besides his great cartoons for Mad, I remember him best for his poster for the 1963 film (then DVD) It’s A Mad, Mad, Mad Mad World and his album cover for Johnny Cash’s 1966 record Everybody Loves A Nut.

His colleagues at Mad posted a tribute to him that gives you a nice retrospective of his career – http://www.madmagazine.com/blog/2016/07/27/mad-remembers-jack-davis-artist

Truly a great – sad to see him go.

e) Being that we find ourselves – both here in the U.S. and abroad – in the midst of a fair amount of political news-making (elections, party overthrows, military coups, etc.), we’d be disappointed if somebody didn’t use the opportunity to create a series of album cover-influenced images featuring a selection of those folks making the headlines. Well, no reason to be disappointed – the team of reporter Graeme Demianyk and picture editor Tahira Mirza of the U.K. edition of the Huffington Post have crafted a selection of 10 covers that insert politicians including former PM David Cameron, past London mayor Boris Johnson and ex-Labour Party leader Ed Miliband into familiar album art scenes from musical acts including the Beach Boys, Sting, Johnny Cash and Madonna, among others. The creators’ reasoning for this work was stated quite simply – “Sometimes politicians look like they’d rather have been in a band. We’ve tried to make it happen”. I wonder if any of the politicians featured in the grouping would have rather been in the theater? I could definitely see Nigel Farage playing Aaron Burr on a poster for Hamilton http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/album-covers-politicians_uk_57754d63e4b0b9c0dc08ce37

f) They keep trying to get away with this crap…blame it on the “if it’s on the Internet, it must be free” approach to art/photo license management…Photographer Glen Craig, whose portraits and performance photos of many of rock music’s best-known acts (Rolling Stones, James Brown, Miles Davis, The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Cash and many, many others) have been seen in hundreds of magazines, newspapers and books over the years and, along the way, he’s had special relationships with many of the musical acts he’s taken photos of. Blues guitarist B.B. King was one of those acts, with Craig’s photos of the “King of the Blues” gracing the covers and inside pages of top music magazines of the day including Cashbox, Hullaballoo, Guitar Player, Downbeat and others, so you know that it was a pretty well-known fact that the two were connected.

This seems to have escaped the fact of those responsible for putting together the cover art for several more-recent Universal Music releases of performances by Mr. King, including 2012’s Ladies & Gentlemen…Mr. B.B. King, whose cover shot is one from Mr. Craig’s archives and was not licensed for this use. Not too happy to have found this out by happenstance, Mr. Craig recently sued the label and Mr. King’s estate to recoup royalties he should have earned from a proper license, with the details of the lawsuit and its outcome still pending. The folks on the TMZ.com site recently posted a startling expose of this atrocity, which you can review via the link at http://www.tmz.com/2016/07/11/b-b-king-universal-music-sued-album-photos/   (right next to the link to the article titled “Gigi Hadid’s HUGE Breasts Spill Out…WOW!). Love them TMZers, don’t you?

g) And I thought that I held grudges for too-long a time…It seems that, back in 2013, a spat was ignited between singer/songwriter Sufjan Stevens and Jehnny Beth of the UK-based punk band The Savages after Stevens posted a critique of the typography that The Savages used on their Silence Yourself debut record. While the band didn’t respond at the time (Stevens did say that he liked the music), Jehnny showed us that the wound remained deeply ingrained in her psyche when she asked the radio jock she was being interviewed by to not play a Stevens song during the show because “…he wrote a quite funny blog post about how much he hated our album cover.” Stereogum’s James Rettig gives us the details in this recent posting – http://www.stereogum.com/1886227/savages-jehnny-beth-responds-to-sufjan-stevens-critique-of-their-album-cover/news/ All I can say, in the vernacular common for an earlier time, is “take a lude, dude”…

h) If you have a story or personal recollection about the late artist/illustrator Richard Amsel (well known for his film poster and album cover work), the guy that is making a documentary film about the artist is looking for your help. As part of his effort to gather materials for his film, Adam McDaniel was at the upcoming San Diego Comic-Con gathering, camera in hand, ready to capture your stories for posterity. In particular, he was looking for other artists who might have worked with Amsel sometime during his career, so if you missed each other during your trip to this huge pop culture extravaganza and have a story you’d like to share, please contact Adam via email at cinemalad5@aol.com. For more information on this film project, please visit their site at http://cinemalad5.wix.com/richardamselmovie

i) While not an article on album cover art per se, I did discover an article about a new book that’ll be hitting the shelves later this year that covers and highlights the work of people – illustrators, graphic designers and industrial designers who, according to a quote from the book’s author,” in many ways, have been left out of design history.” Sound familiar?

The new book, titled The Art of Atari, was written by Tim Lapetino, executive director of the Museum of Video Game Art (playmova.org) and, according to writer Colin Campbell’s recent article for the Polygon web site, “celebrates the packaging and games that were part and parcel of the late-1970s and early-1980s era of console gaming.” Reading through this article, there were many parallels between the perceived roles that designers played in this burgeoning industry – creating eye-catching packaging, marketing materials, advertising, etc. – while in the shadows of the “stars” of the genre (i.e., the video game programmers) with their counterparts in the music business, who typically are the record label execs, band managers and the musical acts themselves that I am pleased to find out that there are others like me (and you, my readers) who have realized just how important it is to provide greater visibility and praise for the “unsung heroes” of these entertainment areas.  I hope to reach out to Tim to find out more about his work and his new online museum but, in the meantime, I hope you’ll take a look at this preview – http://www.polygon.com/features/2016/7/4/12083190/inside-the-art-of-atari

j) In the annals of rock music album art history, few band logos/images have been more memorable than Boston’s Spaceship Guitar, the Roger Huyssen-produced illustration (featuring Gerard Huerta’s lettering) which was found on the cover of the band’s 1976 debut record and which went on to sell over 25 million copies world-wide, becoming the second best-selling debut record of all time.

This year, for their 40th Anniversary tour, the group asked the folks at Seattle-based design/animation shop Straightface Studios to expand upon that original design to create an impressive 3-D animation that provides the backdrop to the band’s live concert production. The two-month project produced thousands of hi-res frames used to create the video, with the awe-inspiring results available for viewing as part of writer Kurt Schlosser’s recent article on the Geek Wire site – http://www.geekwire.com/2016/boston-concert-seattle-straightface/

I have more than a feeling that you’ll like what you see (sorry, I just had to do it).

k) We’re often inspired by the images we find on the covers of our favorite record albums, but this is the first time that I’ve read an article where a noted design/innovation consultant has been able to extract the DNA from classic album cover art and apply it to the exploration of how effective teams of people work together to innovate in the workplace (wow – I haven’t written a sentence like that since leaving the Corporate world 10 years ago, and it still stings a bit…).

In this recent article in the Huffington Post by Geoff Tuff (who heads up the Doblin group within Deloitte) titled “Innovation Lessons from the Dark Side“, the author describes how, after deep deliberation, the Hipgnosis-designed cover art for Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon presented to him “a reflection on how innovation teams can serve as a prism to play two essential roles for their business: dispersion and re-composition.” By “dispersion”, Tuff means feeding a core business in on one side of a prism and having it come out – through the application of a number of innovative ideas – refracted into a myriad of colorful results. “Re-composition” hopes that truly-capable teams are able to look at the many different ways innovation takes place in the “outside world” and then focus on what’s best for their own efforts going forward.

We’ve all noticed that the titles of the songs on the album – “Time”, “Us & Them”, “Money” and others – all relate quite clearly to

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoff-tuff/innovation-lessons-from-t_b_10364740.html

l) The things some artists will do in order to achieve just the “right” look for their album cover photo! While I typically will not send my readers to gossip sites, this recent article on the Perez Hilton site includes a video of heart-throb Nick Jonas standing still while a sheet of glass is broken over his head, with the results captured via high-speed photography and used on the cover of his latest release titled Last Year Was Complicated. Photography by Yu Tsai, with design and art direction by Kyle Goen (AKA Kyledidthis), the guy responsible for recent album covers for pop artists including Babyface, Ariana Grande, Kid CuDi and Erykah Badu. I’m impressed that Kyle was able to convince the musician (and his management) that this was the best way to produce this image – it harkens back to the days (prior to computer graphics) when art directors had to use their imaginations and available resources to create images like this one…

http://perezhilton.com/2016-06-08-nick-jonas-album-cover-art-last-year-was-complicated-broken-glass-head#

m) Attention all album packaging designers – it’s that time of year again to submit your entries to the annual A Design Awards international design competition. If you’re unfamiliar with these awards, here’s a little more of an intro as provided by the organization’s PR folks – “The A’ Design Award & Competition has been established to promote and recognize the best design works in all countries and in all creative disciplines. The primary aim of the A’ Design Award & Competition is to create a global awareness and understanding for good design practices and principles by highlighting the best designs in all countries and in all industrial fields. The ultimate aim of the A’ Design Awards is to push designers, companies and brands worldwide to create superior products and projects that benefit the society.

The A’ Design Award & Competition has a philanthropic goal to advance society by pushing the frontiers of science, design, creativity and technology forward by creating incentives for innovators to come up with better ideas. The A’ Design Competition aims to create incentives that ignite and reward creativity, original ideas and concept generation in all industrial sectors.”

To those of you who work for clients in the music/entertainment industries, there’s an award category called “GRAPHICS AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN AWARD” that focuses on marketing/promo design – posters, flyers, logos, consumer/trade ads, etc. – with more details on that category available via this link – https://competition.adesignaward.com/competitions/graphicsandadvertisingdesign.html

Packaging designers can find out the details of submissions in the “PACKAGING DESIGN” award category via this link – https://competition.adesignaward.com/competitions/packagingdesign.html

Regular submissions will be accepted until September 15th, with the actual judging/award announcements coming out next April, so watch this space for any updates and for information on the winners in these categories. Best of luck to all who enter!

That’s all for now – look for updates every week (usually on Friday) on our news feed –https://www.facebook.com/AlbumCoverHallOfFame – we’ll be back early next month (after the move to our new home near Chicago!) with another summary for you.

All text Copyright 2016 Mike Goldstein and AlbumCoverHallofFame.com – All Rights Reserved.

Album Cover News Recap For February, 2016

Album Cover Hall of Fame’s Album Cover News Recap for the month of February, 2016

It’s early March 2016, and what a month we’ve just had, what with the Superbowl, the Grammy Awards, the Academy Awards, the Portland International Film Festival (gotta plug the local events, right?) and the ongoing media circus surrounding (and feeding) the upcoming  2016 election season. While there has been plenty to distract us from fully-engaging in the things we’re most passionate about, the album art world has continued to deliver a lot for us to see and learn about, with the ACHOF news feed showcasing the many exhibitions, lectures, award shows and other such activities we reported on during the last 29 days. Even with a short month, our news feed has been chock-full of stories on the many interviews, features, artist profiles, new gallery/museum shows and other similar items of interest, I’ll now spend just a few paragraphs giving you a summary of these highlights and updates. After that,  it’ll be your responsibility to visit our site to complete your ingestion of these items of interest by reading and (re)viewing these items at your leisure… Continue reading

Album Cover News Recap for January, 2016

Album Cover Hall of Fame’s Album Cover News Recap for the month of January, 2016

It’s early February 2016 and, while we here in the Pacific NW continue to endure a mostly-dreary Winter season (sun lamps are hot sellers here), we must consider ourselves lucky considering the bashing that many other areas of the country have been getting. And, while the circus sideshow we call “politics” continues to grab much of our attention these days, your Curator (hey, that’s me!) has been fortunate enough to tour art exhibitions in Los Angeles, Palm Springs and here in Portland, where the 2016 Print Fair was held this past weekend at the Portland Art Museum – lots of great art was seen and appreciated – yes, there is an art world beyond Album Cover-land!

My travels did, of course, slightly reduce the number of days I was able to share the latest album art-related news with you (and, even with a Leap Day added, this will occur again naturally in February), but the steady stream of album art-related news remained unabated, with the ACHOF news feed showcasing the many exhibitions, books and other such activities we reported on during the last 30 days. With stories on the interviews, features, profiles, gallery/museum shows and annual  “best and worst” lists adding to the impressive number  of exciting and inspiring articles you found in our news feed, I’ll now spend just a few paragraphs giving you a summary of these highlights and updates. After that,  it’ll be up to you  to visit our site to complete your re-reading of these items of interest on this list by reading/viewing these items at your leisure… Continue reading