Tag Archives: Best Art Vinyl

Album Cover Artist And Art News Summary And Preview For October/November, 2017

ALBUM COVER HALL OF FAME’S ALBUM COVER NEWS RECAP FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER,WITH PREVIEWS FOR NOVEMBER, 2017.

 

 

BY MIKE GOLDSTEIN, ALBUMCOVERHALLOFFAME.COM

Greetings once again to you all on this post-Halloween sunny-but-crisp early November day, 2017. The month of October proved to be a VERY busy one with regards to articles you’ll want to read that reveal new information about those active in the world of album cover art and packaging and, in the summaries I’ve written and via the links provided, you’ll learn more about the latest efforts – as found in exhibitions, via new books and products and featured in interviews in profiles and other related reporting – of some of the most-talented album cover art creators and promoters that I’ve found in my reviews of stories from around the world.

Of course, nothing could be more important than the work going on right now to select the nominees and, after close consideration, voting on a new class of inductees, for the Album Cover Hall of Fame. Over 200 people are being considered for this year’s Class (2017), with the winning names revealed to an eagerly-awaiting public just prior to Thanksgiving (which takes place here in the U.S. this year on November 23rd), so watch this space closely as I’m sure you’ll want to know who “made the cut” this year…

As always, I ask that you please share this info with everyone you know who are fans of great album cover-related talent and, of course, your comments and feedback are quite welcome.

1) Upcoming, recently-launched/currently running and just-closed show/exhibitions –

a) As a follow-up to the article I posted last month about Malcolm Garrett and the Design Manchester show he organized (which included a panel on his work along with a special exhibition devoted to displaying the results of a Buzzcocks Orgasm Addict-related challenge he posed to scores of artists – i.e., according to the info posted by writer Aimee McLaughlin in her review on the Design Week site, “to ‘fuck up’ his original artwork and create “reframed” versions of the record sleeve. Designers that have taken part include established names such as Craig Oldham and Michael C Place, along with young and up-and-coming talent”
Another favorite display at the show was another one focused on Garrett’s entire portfolio of work for the Buzzcocks called Fizzing At The Terminals. While the show ended its run on October 22nd, you can get a decent feel for what was on display at https://www.designweek.co.uk/issues/16-22-october-2017/design-manchester-2017-favourite-exhibitions/

b) Another follow-up to a previously-reported item – you’ll recall that photographer and gallery owner Guido Harari has been working with fellow shooter Frank Stefanko to help publish and promote his new limited-edition book (Bruce Springsteen: Further Up The Road, set to be published on November 1st) and related art prints. Well, the two talented artists have also announced a tour and exhibition that will have stops both in the U.S. – November 1st at the Morrison Hotel Gallery at the Sunset Marquis Hotel in Los Angeles, then on to Morrison Hotel’s gallery in the SoHo area of New York City for an opening on November 9th – and in Italy at Harari’s Wall Of Sound Gallery in Alba, where they’ll be for an afternoon (3PM local time) opening on Saturday, November 18th.

According to Guido’s promo emails, the show at his gallery will be the only one in Europe in 2017, but there will be several other scheduled book signings and Q&A/presentations, including one later in the day (5:30PM local time) on November 18th at the nearby Coro della Maddalena, via Vittorio Emanuele 19 (as part of the “In Poetica” festival) followed by a similar event the next day at 6PM at the Circolo dei Lettori, via Bogino 9, in Turin, Italy, (produced in collaboration with Libreria Luxemburg).
More details at http://www.wallofsoundgallery.com/en/bruce-springsteen/

c) Artist Roger Dean and his chums at the U.K.’s Trading Boundaries gallery have announced the launching of a new exhibition that fans of Dean’s mind-bending imagery will most-certainly enjoy. According to the gallery, the “2017 Breaking Cover Exhibition”, which premieres at 7PM on Friday, November 3rd at the beautiful Sheffield Arms development (Sheffield Green – Nr Fletching – TN22 3RB), “This will be a wonderful opportunity to see a number of new paintings never before exhibited, and an amazing collection of Fine Art Watercolours and Sketches that are rarely shown in public.”

Making the evening extra-special – besides having the chance to meet one of the album art world’s most-respected artists – will be the official launch of a new limited-edition print of Dean’s 1973 artwork for Badger (with its winter motif just perfect for this time of year!). More info on this event and its setting can be found via these links – https://therogerdeangallery.smugmug.com/Exhibition-Dates and https://www.tradingboundaries.com/pages/roger-dean-gallery. As a bonus, there’s a short video on the second page in which Dean talks about his first commercial assignment as a designer (doing the interiors for the famed Ronnie Scott’s jazz club in London) and then his first album art commission for a band called The Gun in 1967 (you might recall their hit song “Race With The Devil”).

Last-minute update – Just announced, Prog Rock fans – get ready for a great opportunity to meet Mr. Dean and one of his most-famous clients – guitarist Steve Hackett – at a special event that will be held at Trading Boundaries on November 18th. Per their announcement – “we are excited to announce a world first… an evening with Roger Dean in conversation with guitarist Steve Hackett discussing the creative process. This is a rare opportunity to witness two legends of both music and art coming together for an evening where anything could happen!” Choose between tickets just for the conversation or, for just a few pounds more, enjoy a special 2-course dinner along with the presentation – ticket info at – https://www.tradingboundaries.com/collections/tickets/products/steve-hackett-roger-dean?

d) While not exactly an album art-specific show, the people who are putting on the upcoming Making Vinyl trade show in Detroit are folks with a lot of history in the area, and the fact that they’re both featuring a number of album packaging experts on panels and the re-launch of the ALEX Awards, which includes prizes for album cover-related projects, leads me to share the details of the show with you this month.

Keynote and panel speakers include a number of names well-known to folks like you who are paying keen attention to developments in the music-related art world, including Jack White (musician and owner of Third Man Records), Jack Stoughton (President of Stoughton Printing), Gail Marowitz (Grammy-winning album art director), Jennifer Freund (CEO of Dorado Packaging), Craig Braun (famed album art director and host of this year’s Alex Awards show), 344 Design’s Stefan Bucher and many others. The Alex Award presentation ceremonies will take place on Monday, November 6th at 7PM local time at the Westin Book Cadillac in Detroit. With hundreds of designs submitted for review this year, it’ll be interesting to see who comes out on top – of course, the information will be announced here on the ACHOF site as it’s made available.

Basic show info and a line-up of events can be found at https://makingvinyl.com/ , while specific info on the Alex Awards has been posted here – https://makingvinyl.com/alex-awards/

e) The Grammy Museum at L.A. Live recently launched a new show that presents an impressive collection of exhibits that present a career retrospective of the seminal LA punk/rockabilly band X and its trend-setting members – Exene Cervenka, John Doe, Billy Zoom, and DJ Bonebrake. With a career that began back in 1977 (with their first, Ray Manzarek-produced album Los Angeles released in 1980) and, after break-ups and reunions, still tours on occasion today, the band both represented and influenced the local music scene via both their music/lyrics and visuals – in fact, Cervenka was such an accomplished mixed-media artist that the Santa Monica Museum of Art assembled a solo exhibition of her work (titled America The Beautiful) back in 2005.

According to the Museum, the show (which will be on display until next March) will put on display original instruments and gear played by the band, original concert flyers, photographs, clothing and personal items, handwritten lyrics from Exene and John Doe and a collection of Exene’s photographs and artwork. They’ll also be showing the 1986 documentary film X: The Unheard Music, which includes a number of interviews as well as studio and live performance footage.

More info on this show is available at http://www.grammymuseum.org/exhibits/current-exhibits/x

I seem to remember that the burning X cover on the band’s debut LP Los Angeles was credited to “J. Ruby Productions” – so very punk, no?

f) The David Bowie Is exhibition continues on its successful world tour with a stop at the Brooklyn Art Museum in NY early next year (opening March 2nd and running through July 5th). This slightly-premature article by Andrew Chow for the New York Times was posted in mid-October on the paper’s web site, so if you’re looking to take a special trip into the city and need something special to build it around, here’s a nice intro to the show about everyone’s favorite musician/actor/art collector – https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/04/arts/design/david-bowie-exhibition-brooklyn-museum.html

g) If you hurry on over to the Lucy Bell Gallery (on Normans Road, in St Leonards on Sea) before November 4th, you’ll still be able to catch what sounds like a really-intriguing exhibition of “rare and iconic” photos of Pink Floyd. Working with the auite-accomplished rock photographer – and owner of the Rockarchive gallery – Jill Furmanovsky and her crew, this show (titled Shine On) includes the works of a number of respected music-industry shooters, including Tony Collins, Colin Prime, Storm Thorgerson, Andrew Whittuck and, of course, Ms. Furmanovsky herself.

According to the gallery’s press release, the show will include images from the “band’s earliest photo shoots in Ruskin Park & Hampstead, to the recording studio at Abbey Road and on the road during the Dark Side of The Moon Tour.. the exhibition includes these and other classic images that capture Pink Floyd’s energy and unique, eclectic style both on and off stage.” Also on display will be several of the late, great Mr. Thorgerson’s alternative takes on album cover art for the band.

https://www.lucy-bell.com/exhibition/pink-floyd

g) While the 12th annual Best Art Vinyl Awards won’t be handed out until after the New Year, it requires the public’s vote to determine the winner and, in order to allow the public to see examples of the nominated covers up close, a show is being staged at The Civic in Barnsley (U.K.) beginning on the 11th of November called “12 Years On 12 Inches” that not only allows attendees that opportunity, but also to participate in several related events, including a “make your own record cover-based linocut workshop”!

With the Barnsley show curated by Jason White, the show will also be duplicated in two other European cities starting with the letter “B” – Bologna and Budapest – thus allowing album art fans from all over the Continent the chance to review the works and then go online to cast their votes for their favorites. Mr. White is also going to be staging a related display at the multi-media event center that will be called “Best Art Vinyl Barnsley” and will show off the album packaging talents of local musical acts and album art producers.

To read more about these exciting happenings, visit – http://www.barnsleycivic.co.uk/events/best-art-vinyl-barnsley and http://www.barnsleycivic.co.uk/events/best-art-vinyl-12-years-on-12-inches

For more information on how to participate in the album art workshop on Saturday, November 11th, please click on over to – http://www.barnsleycivic.co.uk/events/record-cover-lino-cut-workshop

This isn’t the first album cover show staged at The Civic. After a re-development project was finished in early 2009, an album art show called “Gatefold to Download” drew large crowds to the new space, with contributors to the show including Malcolm Garrett (Buzzcocks, Duran Duran, etc.), Mark Farrow (Pet Shop Boys, Spiritualized, etc.) and Rob O’Connor/Stylorouge (Blur, George Michael and others).

h) In late October in Lagos, Nigeria, a career-spanning show built around the 26 album covers designer/illustrator Lemi Ghariokwu crafted for Afro-Beat superstar and human rights activist Fela Kuti before Kuti’s untimely death in 1997 was staged, with Lemi on hand to speak to attendees about his art and his friendship with the beloved and mystical entertainer (when you get a million people showing up at your funeral, I think you can say that you were “beloved”. Lemi was the principal artist for Polygram in Africa for 11 years, also creating stunning packages for stars including Lucky Dube, Miriam Makeba and Bob Marley.

You can read more about the man, his art, his friend Fela and more on the 360nobs.com web site – https://www.360nobs.com/2017/10/lemi-gharioku-temple-management-presents-afro-artbeat-exhibition/

2) Artist interviews/profile articles –

a) It’s nice to have friends in the business…As is so often the case, many musicians have had advanced training in design and the other visual arts, so when the popular band The National wanted to prepare a host of goodies to go along with the release of their latest record (Sleep Well Beast), they turned to friends to help them conceive and then produce not only “the regular stuff” (i.e., album art, t-shirts, posters, etc.) but also a host of other goodies and promotional materials – including billboards and video shorts – that would bear the record’s logo, color scheme and other design cues. Turns out that the band’s bassist, Scott Devendorf, had worked for the noted NYC design firm Pentagram, and so a collaboration with one of that firm’s partners – designer Luke Heyman – was bound to create something unique and impressive.

Via this link, you can take a look at the results of this partnership via this nice article by contributor Gunseli Yalcinkaya on the Dezeen.com site –
https://www.dezeen.com/2017/09/08/pentagram-designs-corporate-visual-identity-national-sleep-well-beast-album-cover/

3) Sales/Auctions –

a) John Lennon’s personal copy of a prototype – complete with Lennon-drawn artwork on the back – of the infamous The Beatles Yesterday And Today “Butcher Cover” is just one of the several album art-related items up for bid as part of the Heritage Auction house’s November 11th Entertainment Auction – https://entertainment.ha.com/c/auction-home.zx?saleNo=7164&ic=breadcrumb-entertainment-071515-interior

In addition to that rarity (which, incidentally, had an opening asking bid of $100,000), there’s an alternative shot – a 12” x 15” B&W, fully-autographed print – taken by photographer Robert Whitaker in late 1964 from the album cover photo session for The Beatles ’65 (opening bid of $10,000). There are several other album cover-related items being offered, including one item that brought back memories. Remember, back in the 70s, the popular custom of taking a gatefold album cover and lining it with aluminum foil for use as a cheat towards a quick sun tan (i.e., those of you who weren’t using the same cover to separate the sticks and seeds from your favorite smoking materials)? Well, Elvis Presley selected his favorite Seals & Crofts LP – Summer Breeze – from his collection to make his own reflector, and for a starting bid of $750, you can works towards making it your own!
Happy bidding, everyone!

4) New Print/Book/Product RELEASES –

a) Noted design authority Steven Heller and writer Greg D’Onofrio have just published a new book on mid-century design masters, including some that worked in the album art field, such as Saul Bass Robert Brownjohn, Neil Fujuita, Reid Miles and the man credited as “the father of the album cover”, Alex Steinweiss (all members of the ACHOF list of “Original Influencers”)

Titled The Moderns: Midcentury American Graphic Design, the 336-page, profusely-illustrated book introduces the reader to the people that created and molded “modern” graphic design beginning in the middle part of the 20th century, bringing their unique takes to designs for print publications, advertising and other forms of promotion, typography and packaging of products of all types. According to the publisher’s (Abrams Books) web site, the book “is the first comprehensive survey of this phenomenon that shaped our visual environment, presenting the work and lives of sixty-three graphic designers. Some were émigrés (including five Bauhaus students and faculty) who brought the gospel of Modernism to America from its sources in Europe. Others were homegrown talents who encountered Modernism in schools and offices at home and abroad. Together, they formed a multigenerational community, learning from one another and forging their individual practices through rigorous engagement with the esthetics of the movement.”

See who’s included – https://themodernsbook.com/ and, to read a review offered up by Theo Inglis on The Creative Review (UK) site, click on over to – https://www.creativereview.co.uk/making-moderns-midcentury-american-graphic-design/

b) Photographer Brian Griffin’s long-awaited music industry career-covering book, titled POP, was finally (and gratefully) released on October 26th, with a special release party and exhibition of over 30 of Brian’s best-loved images being staged both at, and to coincide with, the 2017 Soundedit Festival (for music producers and sound designers) that ran from the 26th through the 29th in Lodz, Poland.

Brian’s been a long-time supporter of this festival (in fact, in 2014, he presented John Cale with the event’s “Man With The Golden Ear” award) and is excited to be able to begin delivery of this book, which features essays by acclaimed music writers Terry Rawlings and Paul Gorman and comes to life after a successful Kickstarter campaign earlier this year. Limited to 1000 copies, the 392 pages contain many of Brian’s best-known album cover images for acts including Depeche Mode, Echo & The Bunnymen, Elvis Costello, Iggy Pop and many others. Learn more about the book via the publisher’s web site at http://gostbooks.com/books/69/pop

…with those of us unable to make it to the event being able to read nicely-illustrated articles about the book via these links – https://genesisimaging.co.uk/brian-griffin-pop-book-launch-exhibition-soundedit-2017/

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/photo-booth/the-stories-behind-brian-griffins-portraits-of-seventies-and-eighties-rock-stars

http://www.heraldscotland.com/arts_ents/15624052.The_Look_of_Love__Brian_Griffin_on_shooting_the_stars_of_1980s_Pop/

c) Speaking of crowd-funded art projects, there’s a new endeavor on Kickstarter that’s looking for support that I thought you might want to learn more about as it includes opportunities not only to receive a specially-produced collection of music as a reward but also to take home one of several very-unique works of art by famed designer Cey Adams. The Smithsonian Anthology of Hip Hop & Rap is, according to the site, “a landmark collection of music, stunning visuals, and powerful stories collected in a 300-page book and 9 CDs.”

With packaging designed by Adams, the founding Creative Director of Def Jam Records, it’s certain to be an eye-and-ear-pleasing package, with special promo items including a limited-edition (one of just 5) fine art print of an alternate album cover from Public Enemy’s Fear of a Black Planet, signed and numbered by artists B.E. Johnson and Adams, as well and PE’s Chuck D himself (at the $5000 level). Already sold out (at the $1500 support level) was a prize package (5 total were made) that included a pair of Adidas sneakers that had been hand-painted (no two alike!) by Adams. The goal is to raise $250,000 before the Nov. 16th cut-off date for funding. As of this date, over 1300 supporters have pledged over $165K, so they look to be on their way to a successful funding effort.

Reserve yours today at https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/smithsonian/smithsonian-anthology-of-hip-hop-and-rap

Here’s a recent ArtDaily article on this project as well – http://artdaily.com/news/99623/Smithsonian-launches-drive-for-major-hip-hop-anthology

d) Also in late October, I received an email with a reminder that there was to be a big book launch party in London for author/historian/all-around nice person Jennifer Otter Bickerdike’s new book (previously described in my news feed) titled Why Vinyl Matters. It all took place at the Rough Trade East record shop in Brick Lane, with Jen bringing some friends along to liven up the launch party, including Julia Ruzicka of Future of the Left and Terry Hall of The Specials and Fun Boy Three. A great time was had by all, and you can take a look at what’s inside Jen’s new book via the following link – https://www.roughtrade.com/us/books/why-vinyl-matters

e) My alert feed brought two items on the Absolute Sound site regarding album cover art books to my attention – one we’ve covered (Art Record Covers by Francesco Spaminato and Julius Wiedemann, published by Taschen – read my March, 2017 interview with Mr. Wiedemann on the ACHOF site at https://albumcoverhalloffame.wordpress.com/2017/03/08/interview-with-taschens-julius-wiedemann-about-his-newest-book-art-record-covers/ ) and one we have not, Visual Vinyl, produced by Heerlen, Netherland’s Schunk Museum and published this past May by Verlag Kettler (and ACC Publishing here in North America), that documents the 2015-16 show at the Museum curated by Harry Prenger built around the collection of vinyl record fan and design guru Jan Van Toorn (AKA “JvT”).

According to the museum’s promotional materials, Visual Vinyl was “a major exhibition devoted to record cover art. This unique collection of LPs, singles and other vinyl rarities will be exhibited at SCHUNCK* from November 2015 onwards. The records form part of the collection of vinyl aficionado and collector, Jan van Toorn, and have never been on public display before…Records and sleeves spanning four decades, with designs representing the work of over a thousand visual artists (with or without the collaboration of “pop” musicians) will be on show.”

This exhibition included many examples of album covers and packages that were created by well known names from the fine art world, including Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Salvador Dali, Damien Hirst, Shepard Fairey, Banksy, Mark Ryden, Raymond Pettibon and Jeff Koons, among others.
http://www.theabsolutesound.com/articles/where-art-meets-music/
http://schunck.nl/agenda/visual-vinyl/

f) LA-based photographer Afshin Shahidi has released a new book titled Prince: A Private View, created after plowing through his portfolio of exclusive photographs of the late rock star – shot in his home, studio and on stage – with many of the pictures never seen before their inclusion in this book. Shahidi is credited for his work on the covers/packages of Prince records including One Nite Alone…Live!, Live At The Aladdin Las Vegas, Planet Earth, Musicology and 3121 (and has shot covers and/or directed music videos for acts including Nas, Rob Thomas, Herb Alpert, The Afghan Whigs and Bare Naked Ladies), but it was his long-standing relationship with Prince that enabled him to capture the musician in a host of intimate and candid photos.

According to Shahidi, as he explained to the folks at ABC News in a feature they recently produced on Afshin and his book, “The album covers for me … are what I was most proud of,” Shahidi said. “I still, to this day, when I see the album cover, I think, ‘Wow … I took that picture.’ Makes me really happy.” “For me, each time I was with Prince, I was still, like, ‘Wow, I’m standing here with Prince!’”

http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/princes-private-photographer-shares-images-late-singer/story?id=50651065

Writing for The Source site, J. Quinones provides us with a bit more detail about the book and the relationship that it was built upon – http://thesource.com/2017/10/24/414889/, and the photographer also adds to the conversation via a special site that’s been set up to let fans review the book and its contents – https://princeaprivateview.com/

5) Other articles of interest –

a) Every once in a while, we’re all given the opportunity to show off just how much we know about famous album cover art and the musical acts that support it, so I was eager to test my chops on NME’s most-recent album cover quiz – one that’s differentiated from many others by the fact that they’re showing “less popular” bits of these covers’ overall image. Well, I got 17 out of 30, which is shameful, but I admit that I don’t know a lot about some of the newer international acts included in the survey. I can only hope and assume that many of you will do much better than this old(ish) man.
http://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/album-detail-quiz-2146415

One bone to pick with the quiz’s creators – I do really wish that they would have showed the entire album cover when the answer was revealed – how am I supposed to have learned anything from this exercise (beside that I was wrong nearly half the time)? Turn it into a “teachable moment” next time, people…

b) So while we’re carefully perusing covers from now on for “the less popular bits”, will we also be on the lookout for all of the hidden messages and clues that are built in to the works of art? Purple Clover’s Kevin Hayes will be, that’s for sure, as he seems to see things where others might not. Recently, he posted an article that presents 14 album covers in which he asserts there’s more than meets the eye, such as Paul McCartney’s hand-lettered message of love to his wife Linda found on the cover of his 1971 solo release Ram, the multiple faces and a hula skirt that are found in artist Lee Conklin’s “Lion” drawing done for Santana’s 1969 debut album and, one of my favorites, Mouse & Kelley’s really hard-to-see “We Are Acid” sub-text found in the lettering for the Grateful Dead’s 1969 release titled Aoxomoxoa.
Bring your Visine and take the tour at – http://www.purpleclover.com/entertainment/8048-album-covers-hidden-message/

c) Not one but two detailed “making of” articles about Rolling Stones album covers hit the web recently, with staffers from the UK’s Far Out Magazine site digging deep to provide the straight poop about how the cover for the band’s The Satanic Majesties Request (which offered us a 3-D “lenticular” image shot by Sgt. Pepper’s photographer Michael Cooper) – http://faroutmagazine.co.uk/the-cover-uncovered-their-satanic-majesties-request-the-rolling-stones/ , while over on the LA Weekly site, writer Matt Wake interviews two of the most-respected album cover contributors of all time – designer John Van Hamersveld and photographer Norman Seeff – about what it took to produce the highly-detailed gatefold cover for Exile On Main Street, which also included a back cover shot taken in downtown Los Angeles (on Main Street, of course) by famed photographer Robert Frank.
http://www.laweekly.com/music/how-the-rolling-stones-exile-on-main-st-was-finished-in-los-angeles-at-sunset-sound-8594714

d) Appearing this month to provide the keynote address at this year’s Society for News Design (SND) conference in London will be a designer who’s left lasting impressions on all aspects of the graphic design business – designer, creative director, typographer and currently the Dean of the School of Communication at the Royal College of Art (UK), Neville Brody. Album art fans will instantly recall Brody’s work on album covers for the Stiff Records label and others – The Slits – Return of the Giant Slits; Cabaret Voltaire – Red Mecca, 2X45, Johnny YesNo and The Original Sound of Sheffield 83/87; 23 Skidoo – Seven Songs, The Culling is Coming, Urban Gamelan and Just Like Everybody; Depeche Mode – Singles Box, Vol. 1 and Throbbing Gristle’s Five Albums, among others.

His impressive bio includes stints as the art director for magazines such as The Face and Arena, with his more recent work managed via his role as the principal of his design firm brody associates including projects for clients in many industries world-wide, including media companies such as the BBC, D&AD, The Guardian, MTV Europe, Paramount Studios, The Times (London) and Wallpaper* Magazine, venues such as Parco (Japan), The Barbican (London) and the Institute of Contemporary Arts (London) and retail product firms including Apple, Asics, Bentley, Bonfire Snowboarding, Chloe, Deutsche Bank, Dom Perignon, Homechoice, Microsoft, Nike, Salomon, Sony Playstation, YSL and many others. Fans of print newspapers will most-likely know Brody from the fact that he developed Times Modern for The Times of London newspaper, the first new font for the publication since Times New Roman was introduced in 1932.

Brody’s keynote takes place on November 3rd, with more information about the conference and its related displays and events available at – https://www.snd.org/2017/10/neville-brody-is-keynote-speaker-at-snd-london-2017/

e) The licensing world continues to show the love to The Beatles (just goes to show you – spend a little bit up front on great art for your music products and it could reward you over and over) as you’ll read in this recent Business Insider “Insider Picks” feature about the new socks sets from Swedish socks company Happy Socks bearing some of the artwork used in the making of the band’s 1968 animated psychedelic film Yellow Submarine. http://www.businessinsider.com/happy-socks-the-beatles-yellow-submarine-collection-2017-10/#happy-socks-x-the-beatles-collector-box-set-1

For only $84 for the set (slightly cheaper on Amazon.com), fans of the Fab Four who must own everything ever made featuring likenesses of the band can satiate that hunger and own a customized, LP-sized/shaped box containing six pairs of “limited-edition”, colorfully-decorated, Pepperland-themed socks. While, for $14 per pair, you can purchase four of the six total designs – blue Glove, “monsters”, Pepperland and Chief Blue Meanie/Jeremy – buying the set of six gets you an Apple pair and a Yellow Submarine pair as well, with the box thrown in for free (such a deal!).
https://www.happysocks.com/us/thebeatles/

The company also has assembled a line of socks and boxer shorts featuring designs that came from a collaboration with electronic music star/record producer Steve Aoki… https://www.happysocks.com/us/steveaoki/

f) Having recently watched a new animated Halloween TV special built around Michael Jackson-related music, imagery and unique world view (titled Michael Jackson’s Halloween – not sure if it’ll become a classic, but we’ll see…), it’s clear that the Jackson estate is eager to continue to push into uncharted production territory, as is evidenced by the new Michael Jackson SCREAM AR “augmented reality package” included as part of his recently-released compilation by the same name. A joint-production of Jackson’s team along with Sony and Shazam, customers will be treated to a unique experience when they use the music discover app’s camera feature to unlock hidden content when its pointed at the poster included in the package. Read more about it in Gil Kaufman’s coverage of the product on the Billboard Magazine web site – http://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/pop/7981733/michael-jackson-scream-compilation-augmented-reality

Personally, I’m going to be happy waiting for the chance to see the Michael Jackson ONE show in Las Vegas someday – no devices (other than my eyes and ears) required.

g) Finally, I wanted to give you an update on “Flying Pigs In Front Of Trump Tower in Chicago” project I reported on a while back. While the installation had been scheduled to be up before the end of the Summer, the organizers ran into a snag or two and, while it has delayed our chance to enjoy some Pink Floyd-inspired (and Roger Waters-approved) shenanigans here in the Windy City, it is giving the organizers some time to raise some additional funds that they’d need to do this properly – https://archpaper.com/2017/07/trump-sign-flying-pigs-delayed/

The inflatable pig icon that was used by Hipgnosis in their efforts to fly one over the Battersea Power Station to create something special for the cover shot for Animals has reappeared many times since its 1977 premiere, at concerts for both Pink Floyd and Roger Waters as well as in the background in several movies, Danny Boyle’s 2012 film shot for the Olympics and even an episode of The Simpsons, so this particular use is not without precedent and would certainly make my day…

That’s all for now – be on the lookout for timely news alerts on our news feed – https://www.facebook.com/AlbumCoverHallOfFame – we’ll be back early next month with another monthly summary for you.

All text and images included in this article are Copyright 2017 Mike Goldstein and AlbumCoverHallofFame.com – All Rights Reserved. All of trade names mentioned in these summaries are the properties of their respective owners and are used for reference only.

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Album Cover Artist And Art News Summary And Preview For September/October, 2017

ALBUM COVER HALL OF FAME’S ALBUM COVER NEWS RECAP FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER, 2017, WITH PREVIEWS FOR OCTOBER, 2017.

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BY MIKE GOLDSTEIN, ALBUMCOVERHALLOFFAME.COM

Greetings once again to you all on this first day of October, 2017. When I signed off with you 30 days ago, never did I think that I’d be sending out my next news summary on the heels of not one but three more catastrophic weather events (Hurricanes Irma and Maria and the Mexico City-area earthquake) and that millions of people in the U.S., Mexico and the Caribbean would be in such need of the basic necessities of life…then, this would be followed up in a 9/28 article by the Washington Post that detailed the results of a new Washington Post-ABC News poll that stated that, now, a majority of Americans admit that “climate change contributed to the severity of the recent hurricanes” (as opposed to the results of the same poll, taken a dozen years ago, which showed that most Americans “dismissed the role of global warming and said such severe weather events just happen from time to time”).

Ya think?

For now, you can make a difference in the lives of people who were affected by these natural disasters with some guidance from the Center For Disaster Philanthropy, an organization whose partner charities have gotten together to “transform the field of disaster philanthropy to increase donor effectiveness throughout the lifecycle of disasters through our educational, fund opportunities and strategic guidance.“ Very helpful and informative – http://disasterphilanthropy.org/

While I firmly believe that Mother Nature will one day – sooner rather than later – rid her planet of all us pesky and self-absorbed critters in a very theatrical fashion, I can only hope that, for the time being, this doesn’t prevent some of us from enjoying (and respecting) the beauty of the natural world and how it continues to inspire creative-types to do interesting work. The month of September proved to be a VERY busy one for folks reporting on happenings in the world of album cover art/artists, and in the summary and via the links provided, you’ll learn more about the latest efforts of some of the most-talented album cover art creators and promoters that I’ve found in the daily news cycle, featuring fascinating and interesting stories on a wide range of related topics.

As always, I ask that you please share this info with everyone you know who are fans of great album cover-related talent and, of course, your comments and feedback are quite welcome.

1) Upcoming, recently-launched/currently running and just-closed show/exhibitions –

a) Highly-respected British photographer Martin Parr – who has given us memorable photos for musical acts including Salad (Drink Me), The Saw Doctors (Songs From Sun Street), Madness (Wonderful) and several others – has an interesting show up at Blackwell Hall (in the Weston Library) on the campus of Oxford University (UK) that puts on display the results of a multi-year commission he was given there several years ago to photograph the place and its interesting array of people. The university press has also released a book – simply titled Oxford by Martin Parr – to accompany the show, which is on display now through the 22nd of October, with Diane Smyth, writing for the British Journal of Photography, providing us with an introduction at http://www.bjp-online.com/2017/09/shooting-the-establishment-martin-parrs-oxford/

More details about the show can be found on the Photo Oxford 2017 web site – http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/whatson/whats-on/upcoming-events/2017/sep/martin-parr-oxford

While info on the book – co-authored with noted journalist Simon Winchester – can be found on the Oxford University Press site at https://global.oup.com/academic/product/oxford-9780198724414?cc=us&lang=en&

b) I’ve received a bit more information about the November 1 opening of the Spencer Drate/Judith Salavetz/Sylvia Reed-curated record art show that will be on display at the One Art Space Gallery on Warren Street in New York City…There will be an opening reception on Wednesday, November 1st from 7PM – 9PM EST at the gallery (there’s nothing up yet on this event, but if you go to the gallery’s “Upcoming Events” page (http://oneartspace.com/upcoming-events/) soon, I’m sure you’ll find out more.

As I’ve previously noted, the exhibition is called “FOR THE RECORD: THE VINYL RECORD COVER SHOW” and, according to the show’s producers, it will be “the first Vinyl Record Cover Show integrating the history of 12″ and 45 record covers together with a selection of some of the best designed 12″ and 45RPM record covers from the past to the present.” It will run through November 30th.

The award-winning team of Mr. Drate and Ms. Salavetz have been creating memorable promo and packaging imagery for music industry clients for many years now, with examples of their work including Joan Jett & The Blackhearts – Album, Glorious Results of A Misspent Youth and Good Music; Bon Jovi – Bon Jovi; The Ramones – It’s Alive, Road To Ruin and End Of The Century; Richard Hell & The Voidoids – Blank Generation; Talking Heads – Fear Of Music; The Searchers – The Searchers; Billy Squier – Don’t Say No; Lou Reed – New York and Magic And Loss; Buster Poindexter – Buster’s Spanish Rocketship; Marshall Tucker Band – Walk Outside The Lines; The Fabulous Thunderbirds – Hot Number and Powerful Stuff; Bobby Brown – King Of Stage; The Beach Boys – Summer In Paradise; Dee Dee King – Standing In The Spotlight and many others, so you can rest assured that there will be much to look at on display.

They’re also the authors of several books on the topic of rock music-related imagery, including Rock Art: CDs, Albums & Posters, published in 1994; SWAG: Rock Posters Of The 90s (with a forward by designer Art Chantry, published in 2003) and its follow up titled SWAG 2: Rock Posters Of The 90s And Beyond (2005); as well as 45 RPM, the first visual history book on 7″ record sleeve design and Five Hundred 45s (2010).

c) Launched on Saturday, September 16th with an opening reception was Eastern Projects Gallery’s new group exhibition of some of the best examples of Southern California art and design, produced by a group of five artists known as “The California Locos”. While, as the press release indicates, “for the last five decades, each LOCO has created their own distinct and recognized style, built out of the kaleidoscope that is the West Coast experience”, for this show the group (which includes Chaz Bojórquez, Dave Tourjé, John Van Hamersveld, Norton Wisdom and Gary Wong) has opened their arms to embrace works added by several more heralded designers/artists from the area such as Mister Cartoon, Shepard Fairey, Estevan Oriol, RETNA, SLICK and Robert Williams, and with a number of these participants sporting a nice portfolio of album cover images in addition to their work in the Graffiti, Hot Rod, Skate, Surf and Tattoo arenas, the entire display will be truly entertaining for all attendees.

Several brand-new works, including a low-rider automobile created by Mister Cartoon, a hot rod by Dave Tourje and more, will help make this event all the more intriguing.

The show runs through October 28th,, with more information available at – http://www.californialocos.com/event.html
EASTERN PROJECTS GALLERY – 900 North Broadway #1090, Los Angeles, CA 90012 – http://www.easternprojectsgallery.com/

d) More dates and venues have been announced for the upcoming Best Art Vinyl 2017 album art awards show. With this celebration of great record cover packages and the talented designers, photographers and artists in other specialties that create them – staged by the fine people at Artvinyl.com – now in its 12th year, the show’s producers have delivered on their promise to allow more public access to displays of the 50 shortlisted record covers (nominated by experts in the arts and music marketing) and, ultimately, the winner of this year’s competition, with shows now slated for the following places and dates:

The Vinyl Café London – November 13th 2017 – April 30th 2018; The Civic Barnsley – November 10th 2017 – January 30th 2018; Mono Art & Design Budapest – November 16th 2017 – January 30th 2018; Semm music Store Bologna – November 20th 2017 – April 30th 2018; The Hari Hotel London – January 9th 2018 – March 30th 2018 and High End Society Munich 2018 in May 2018

Exhibiting alongside the examples of the nominated artworks will be the winning covers from the previous 12 years. Voting for this year’s nominees will commence on November 10th, with votes placed online at http://www.artvinyl.com/lp-records-displayed-as-artwork-prize/
Be sure to visit starting November 10th to place your votes, with the winners announced in a ceremony next January. More details to follow here…

e) Always-controversial artist Richard Prince has recently launched a solo exhibition of new works that are on display at both locations of Berlin’s Galerie Max Hetzler that should be of interest to anyone who’s been following his 40+ year career during which he’s often pushed the limits of art world norms, particularly when it comes to the term “appropriation” in that he’s often times “borrowed” other peoples’ images to spin them to his own liking.

In this show, titled “Super Group”, Prince has created a series of visuals for a make-believe musical acts seemingly already at the top in terms of both fame and fortune, with these works being assembled from (according to the gallery’s press) “actual or scanned and printed record sleeves, stapled and glued onto the surface as well as photos, posters, magazine covers, some even contain real bras along with images of such (perhaps hinting at a two person rock band called Black Bra that Prince once was part of). Paint and oil stick are seemingly rapidly applied, covering parts of the collaged surface and canvas while leaving others empty so that the underlying plane stays visible, creating an impression of depth through overlapping layers.” What’s also notable is that, for these new works, he’s appropriated from his own earlier works, with figures and other items from an earlier series of work (called “Hippie Drawings”) showing up in many places.

Earlier this year, the 68-year-old, New York-based photographer and painter became embroiled in another lawsuit when another photographer challenged Prince’s “fair use” claim for another “borrowed” image. Album art fans will remember his art and photos found on records released by Hole, Air, Sonic Youth, Robbie Robertson and others. With more information about this new show shared by Artnet’s Kate Brown in an article titled “Richard Prince, Rock Star? The Artist Indulges His Inner Musician With Trippy New Album-Cover Paintings”, fans can learn the latest about this always-fascinating artist/provocateur – https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/richard-prince-exhibition-max-hetzler-1096808? , while gallery information can be found on their site (in English) at http://maxhetzler.com/exhibitions/richard-prince-super-group-2017/press-en/

f) When photographer Trevor Key died of a brain tumor at the age of 48 in 1995, he left behind a portfolio of images for clients like Phil Collins (Face Value, Hello I Must Be Going!, …But Seriously and Both Sides Now), New Order (Fine Time and Technique), Mike Oldfield (Tubular Bells and Hergest Ridge), OMD (Organisation), the Sex Pistols (The Great Rock ‘n’ Roll Swindle), Ultravox (Rage In Eden) and many more both done alongside of Art Director Peter Saville for Factory Records and for others.

While he spent his career in London, he grew up and attended school in the northern city of Hull, the U.K.’s 2017 city of culture and home to the Hull School of Art and Design, which is hosting a show of Key’s photo from now through October 18th, after which it will be on display in various venues within the city.

Here’s a link to some recent BBC coverage of the event – http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-humber-41331715 along with a link to a video on the Hull 2017 site where noted editors, designers, art directors and Key’s former assistant (photographer Toby McFarlan) discuss Key’s work and its ongoing influence in the world of music photography – https://www.hull2017.co.uk/whatson/events/trevor-keys-top-40/

g) Two shows that ended their runs in September include Rob Tufnell’s tribute to the late, great designer Barney Bubbles (“Optics and Semantics”) – http://www.robtufnell.com/Exhibitions/Barney%20Bubbles/index.html which included examples of the talented artist’s album art, posters, videos and furniture, while back on September 18th – the 47th anniversary of the death of legendary guitarist Jimi Hendrix, but on that day I found a link to a recent interview with famed photographer Karl Ferris – responsible for the memorable photos found on the first three Jimi Hendrix Experience covers – http://ib3tv.com/lautor-de-les-portades-historiques-de-jimmy-hendrix-exposa-a-lhotel-pacha-deivissa.html regarding his recent gallery show (which closed on September 17th) at the Hotel Pacha on the island of Ibiza, where Karl has lived for many years and the place where he met his early collaborators, the Dutch design duo of Marijke Koger and Simon Posthuma AKA “The Fool”.

Although the interviewer’s audio track of Karl’s interview is in Catalan, you can still here bits of his statements and answers in English. In either case, it’s nice to see him looking so well and surrounded by so many great examples of his best-known photographs, including those for Hendrix.

h) Although the Summer has ended, it was a big one for exhibitions focused on the 50 anniversary of the emergence of Hippie counter-culture, with all its trappings, which has been labeled the “Summer of Love”, with one in particular, “The Summer of Love Experience: Art, Fashion and Rock & Roll” at San Francisco’s deYoung Museum (according to information in this recent article on the Art Daily site) setting attendance records, with over 25,000 visitors during “its final week before closing on August 20. Over its 19-week run, almost 270,000 visitors from around the world came to the de Young to relive the Summer of Love, making the exhibition the highest attended since Girl with a Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis debuted at the de Young in 2013. – http://artdaily.com/news/98712/-The-Summer-of-Love-Experience–Art–Fashion–and-Rock—Roll–closes-with-record-attendance-numbers#.WbhDd7pFyM8

i) Also just received an announcement (with details forthcoming) about a Michael Jackson art show (to be titled “Michael Jackson: On The Wall”) at National Portrait Gallery in London next year (which would have been the singer’s 60th birthday), with some initial details in this article on The Guardian (UK) site – https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/sep/20/michael-jacksons-impact-on-art-explored-in-national-portrait-gallery-show

I’m sure it’ll be a thriller, and I hope to beat it on over there to rock with you at the show. I’ll not stop til I’ve had enough unless, of course, it’s bad… 😉

2) Artist interviews/profile articles –

a) Photographer Danny Hastings, whose portfolio of images reads like a who’s who of major hip-hop music originators – Big Pun, KRS-One, Nas, Wu-Tang Clan and many others – is the subject of a nicely-detailed profile and interview on the Remezcla site (a top lifestyle site for Latino Millennials) by reporter Matthew Ruiz that also includes info on recent show in LA – http://remezcla.com/features/music/danny-hastings-profile/

b) Goldmine Magazine’s chief editor Patrick Prince shares an interview with Pink Floyd artist Gerald Scarfe from his house in Chelsea, London that was featured on a recent Goldmine Magazine podcast about the original works (paintings and storyboards) from The Wall that are on sale at the San Francisco Art Exchange – http://www.goldminemag.com/podcast/pink-floyd-artist-gerald-scarfe-carlos-santana-band-jackyl-goldmine-magazine-podcast-episode-7

Scarfe had originally met Roger Waters after the PF bassist/songwriter had seen an earlier (1971)hand-drawn animated film produced by Scarfe about his impressions on America titled Long Drawn-Out Trip: Sketches From Los Angeles on TV and thought that he’d be the right person to help him realize his visions for Waters’ record/film/concert masterpiece.

c) In the early 1990s, there was a rather well-known photo taken of the late Kurt Cobain wearing a t-shirt featuring the album cover art from Austin, TX-based musician/artist Daniel Johnston’ Hi How Are You? record (featuring a strange, frog-ish creature named “Jeremiah, The Innocent”), after which the self-taught artist gained cult status internationally.

While battles with mental illness made it difficult for Johnston’s career to take off in any significant fashion, he has remained a person of great interest to those impressed with his strange abilities (as shown in the 2005 documentary The Devil And Daniel Johnston, by Jeff Feuerzeig. Health issues have recently forced Daniel to curb his touring, so he’s just embarked on what’s been announced as his final tour, with a schedule posted for the 8 shows (plus one in Austin, date TBD) – http://austin.culturemap.com/news/arts/09-18-17-hi-how-are-you-daniel-johnston-final-tour/#slide=0

d) Fans of the strange-but-wonderful cartoons of artist Edward Steed’s that are often found in the New Yorker Magazine will want to read this recent interview by Min Chen on the Surface Magazine web site about the almost “Where’s Waldo-like” work he created for the cover of singer/songwriter Father John Misty’s just-released record called Pure Comedyhttp://www.surfacemag.com/articles/edward-steed-talks-pure-comedy-album-illustrations/ According to Steed, his inspiration for the detailed artwork was pretty straight-forward – “I was just trying to make something that’s good for people to look at while listening to the record. I just drew the type of album cover I would want if I made an album, which I never will.” Job well done, sir!

e) The photo team of Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott are known for their creative force, and lately they’ve been known specifically for Taylor Swift’s album art. Take the link to read a nice profile of them and their work and their collaborations – including on the controversial cover for her upcoming release (Nov. 10th) called reputation – with the immensely-popular Ms. Swift on the Fans Of Taylor Taylor Swift fan site written by contributor Kara Johnson – https://fansoftaylor.com/2017/09/16/photographers-mert-and-marcus-discuss-collaborating-with-taylor-swift/

f) Fans of great monster/horror art (hey, that’s me!) mourn the passing of a great one…On September 14th, 2017, the legendary artist/illustrator Basil Gogos died, leaving behind a legacy of illustrations for magazines, books and, as you might figure, album covers for acts including Electric Frankenstein, The Misfits and, most-notably, rocker Rob Zombie. He’s probably best-known for the scores of covers he did, beginning in 1960, for monster fan magazines such as Famous Monsters of Filmland, Rue Morgue, Creepy and MonsterScene (his takes on The Creature from the Black Lagoon were, to me, his most-impressive works).

A coffee table book which included a retrospective of many of his best works, titled Famous Monster Movie Art of Basil Gogos, was published by Vanguard Productions in 2005 and, the next year, Gogos received the “Best Book” award as well as being named to the “Monster Kid Hall of Fame” at the Rondo Hutton Classic Horror Awards gathering for his exceptional contributions to classic horror. In 2008, he won both “Best Cover” and “Artist of the Year” award from the same organization.

The Horror News Network presents us with his obiturary – http://www.horrornewsnetwork.net/rest-peace-basil-gogos-dead-78/ while over on the Rob Zombie site (Gogos did the memorable image on the Hellbilly Deluxe album cover), you’ll find another tribute to this impressive talent, now gone… https://robzombie.com/tag/basil-gogos/

3) Sales/Auctions –

a) From the PR Newswire, here’s a story about an auction of a highly-desireable set of Markus Klinko photos taken for the cover of Houston, TX native Beyonce’s debut solo album, 2003’s Dangerously in Love – “ that was held in early September and intended to help raise money for Red Cross efforts to provide relief for victims of the recent weather disasters in Houston and along the Gulf Coast – “Award-winning, international fashion and celebrity photographer Markus Klinko and Texas-based Modern Rocks Gallery today announced the launch of “Dangerously in Love with Houston: Modern Rocks Gallery / Markus Klinko Auction,” an online auction of signed, first worldwide edition Beyoncé photographs with proceeds benefiting the Red Cross and its Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. “

It continues – “The online auction will feature three 16″ X 20″ photographs …signed by Markus Klinko. Fujifilm supports the auction with printing and mounting, while Broncolor will donate shipping of the photographs to auction winners. All money raised from the auctions will go to the Red Cross Houston and Gulf Coast relief efforts.

Bidding opened at $2500 for the set, with the auction currently online (hosted by 32Auctions.com), reached via the button at https://www.modernrocksgallery.com/hurricane-relief
https://www.facebook.com/ModernRocksGallery

b ) Michael Spencer-Jones Oasis album art goes on sale with special event – while the gallery is still working with the photographer on just the right date to do this (was originally scheduled for October 6th), they have put up some preliminary information on the book and some of the prints that will be made available for sale as well. https://www.thearchivistsgallery.com/blogs/exhibitions/save-the-date-supersonic-the-oasis-photographs-book-signing-event-with-michael-spencer-jones-october-6th-2017?

I’d last reported on Spencer-Jones’ work back in 2014 when I’d done a profile on one of his collaborators, designer/photographer Brian Cannon, so it’s nice to see that the art world’s interest in these great photos (which became even more-popular as the records, such as Whatever, Definitely Maybe, (What’s The Story) Morning Glory, Be Here Now, Don’t Look Back In Anger and Wonderwall, all became huge international hits. Spencer-Jones has also created notable cover shots for bands including Suede (Stay Together, Singles and So Young), The Verve (A Storm In Heaven, Urban Hymns and A Northern Soul), New Fast Automatic Daffodils (Bong and Body Exit Mind) and Lyres (On Fire), among others. More specifics as they’re released…

4) New Print/Book RELEASES –

a) Heralded Scottish photographer Harry Benson CBE has had a very busy schedule the past couple of years, first as the star of the successful documentary film Harry Benson: Shoot First, then receiving a special Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Center of Photography, shooting a portrait of U.S. President Donald Trump – he’s the only photographer who has taken portraits of the past twelve (!!) U.S. Presidents, beginning with Eisenhower – and now, working with the folks at PowerHouse Books, releasing what’s being called his “unparalleled magnum opus” – a 300-page career retrospective titled Harry Benson: Persons of Interest (Portraits That Defined An Era), with ’s new book hitting the shelves soon, with pre-orders now being accepted at – http://www.powerhousebooks.com/books/harry-benson-persons-of-interest/

According to the publisher’s news release, “Harry traveled to America with the Beatles in 1964 and never looked back. Under contract to LIFE Magazine for 30 years, Harry has photographed for major magazines including Time, Vanity Fair, Newsweek, French Vogue, Quest, Paris Match, Forbes, Town & Country, Architectural Digest, People, and The London Sunday Times Magazine…With subjects ranging from Queen Elizabeth to Amy Winehouse, from Frank Sinatra to Brad Pitt, from Greta Garbo to Kate Moss, from Winston Churchill to Hilary Clinton, and Donald Trump, Benson explores and delights our public fascination with his images of the lives of the rich, powerful, and famous. “

b) While designer/artist Jamie Reid might be best-known to album art fans for the work that helped promote punk icons the Sex Pistols to international stardom in the late 1970s (and, later on, artists such as Billy Childish, Jo Fletcher and Afro Celt Sound System), lately Reid has continued to produce artwork that brings his anti-establishment sensibilities to highlight the absurdities in today’s world of political and corporate chicanery, but he’s also produced artwork for a project called Eight-Fold Year, during which he’s released a new work of art every day based on the Druid concept of the year being divided into eight “essential” parts (solstices, equinoxes and four other critical seasonal dates).

To bring the entire portfolio of these works to fans around the world, Reid has just released a new paperback book (also titled Eight-Fold Year) where all 365 of the images (paintings and photographs) can be enjoyed all in one place. To provide an introduction and explain things to us laypeople, Reid enlisted the help of Philip Carr-Comm, Chief of the Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids, to write such texts.

More information on this book and project can be found on his web site at http://www.eightfoldyear.org/, while you can keep up-to-date on Reid’s latest efforts on his web site at http://www.jamiereid.org/

c) While not specifically a book about album cover art, a new book just out by author Kent Hartman titled Goodnight, L.A.: The Rise and Fall of Classic Rock – The Untold Story from Inside the Legendary Recording Studios that focuses on the often outrageous (self-indulgent, narcissistic, etc. – I’m sure we can all think of appropriate adjectives) behaviors and bacchanalia that took place inside these workplaces during the making of some of your favorite record albums. With the writer tapping the memories of two key people – producer Keith Olsen and session guitarist Waddy Wachtel – you’ll learn a bit more about the amount of hand-holding, ego-boosting and appetite-feeding it often took to get some of the most-iconic tracks put on to tape.

They also included stories by some of the others who were tasked to help produce, package and promote these products, such as ACHOF Inductee (John) Kosh, who recalls the heart-warming story of having to wait three days for a certain rocker to show up for a photo shoot, only to decide at that point that he’d changed his mind about the album cover concept and then suggested a “we’re not REALLY going to do this” idea as an alternative. Read more about this new tome in reporter Bob Ruggiero’s intro to the book on the Houston Press site -. http://www.houstonpress.com/music/cocaine-and-control-boards-la-classic-rock-in-the-70s-9780972

d) If you’re looking for a gift for your favorite Prog Rock fan (besides another record/CD or a certificate for the aforementioned mocha latte), you can now pre-order one of the 600 limited-edition copies of author Jerry Ewing’s new book on the topic titled Wonderous Stories: A Journey Through The Landscape of Progressive Rock. According to the publisher’s PR, the book will guide the reader through the genre’s history, “from the origins of the genre, through the glory years of the late 60s and 70s, to its contemporary resurgence led by, amongst others, Steven Wilson and Opeth. The book is introduced with a foreword written by Steve Hackett.”

The book’s “Deluxe Edition” was designed by famed album cover artist Carl Glover, the guy responsible for a number of memorable covers for acts including Gentle Giant, Jethro Tull, The Pretty Things, Porcupine Tree, Blackfield and an entire series for Prog Rock stalwarts Marillion. The clothbound book’s 160 pages include over 450 images, including band photos, press images and, of course, album covers. The book includes a COA signed by both Glover and the author and also includes an 8” x 10” art print – a nice package for the quite-reasonable asking price of £50.00.

Pre-orders are now being accepted on The Flood Gallery’s web site – https://www.thefloodgallery.com/collections/wondrous-stories-a-journey-through-the-landscape-of-progressive-rock/products/wondrous-stories-a-journey-through-the-landscape-of-progressive-rock?
with deliveries beginning in early December.

5) Other articles of interest –

Quick note – nominations and voting begins soon for this year’s class of inductees to the Album Cover Hall of Fame in the areas of design, photography, illustration and other related fields. Eager to see who are the top vote-getters this year – lots of talented people still yet to be inducted, so watch this space…

a) Research led me to a site, created by a mysterious and unknown artist simply called “Admin”, where you’ll find a collection of hand-made drawings of album covers along with a short story about the record. It’s called, in a straight-forward fashion, “Hand Drawn Album Covers”. Is it good? You be the judge. It is certainly inspired… http://www.handdrawnalbumcovers.com/

b) While some look at fans of Prog Rock as being people just as contemptuous as “mocha-sipping, Birkenstock wearing, Prius-driving Lefties”, I am proud to say that I’ve long been a fan of the genre – both the music and the art – and so I’m very pleased to be able to share two Prog-related stories – one being about the nominees – and the eventual winner – in the “Album Cover of the Year” category of the 2017 Progressive Music Awards festivities and the other (to be found back in Section 4 about New Books) being that a new book that looks to provide an in-depth historical review of “Prog Rock” (by Prog Magazine editor Jerry Ewing) which will be published in time for Holiday gift-giving.

To begin, here are the nominees for this year’s Progressive Music Awards’ “Album Cover of the Year” (musical act/album title):

Ayreon – The Source; Big Big Train – Grimspound; Heather Findlay – I Am Snow; King Crimson – Radical Action To Unseat The Hold Of Monkey Mind; Kylver – The Island; Mastodon – Emperor Of Sand; Opeth – Sorceress; Robert Reed – Sanctuary II; Tim Bowness – Lost In The Ghost Light and Wolf People – Ruins

The winner was announced at ceremonies on September 14th, with artists whose works are featured on these nominated covers including well-known creatives such as Ben Singleton, Alan Brown, Travis Smith, Jarrod Gosling and Luke Insect, so was most-interesting to see who fans eventually selected as this year’s top artist.

First, you can take a look at the nominated works via the link at http://2017.prog.awards.teamrock.com/vote/album-cover

AND THE WINNER WAS – from the previously-noted list of talented nominees, a winner was chosen in the “Album Cover of the Year” category, and that winner is the team responsible for the creation of the cover for Tim Bowness’ album Lost In The Ghost Light (credited to the multi-talented designer/musician Jarrod Goslling).

Here’s a link to the list of all of the winners in last week’s award ceremonies – https://www.udiscovermusic.com/news/steve-hackett-progressive-music-awards/
as well as a link to the musician’s site – http://timbowness.co.uk/lost-in-the-ghost-light/ Digging around a bit, I also found a video interview with designer Jarrod Gosling about his work on the previous Bowness LP – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fekq273l4yo
Congratulations to the winner and all of the nominees for jobs well done – the fans are all very happy!

c) Filed under “way too cool for school” – those of you who thought that album covers created with “special effects”, such as the “3-D” and “lenticular” covers found on records such as 1967’s Their Satanic Majesties Request by the Rolling Stones, The Holy Land by Johnny Cash in 1969 and 1971’s Captain Beyond (with artwork by Pacific Eye & Ear artist Joe Garnett) will be pleased and/or surprised to know that the inspiration to display moving images on record packages remains, carried on by various musical acts/labels and, lucky for us, collected by collector DJ Food and shared via a regular column on The Vinyl Factory web site.

They kicked things off not too long ago with this nicely-illustrated (including some cool animated GIFs) article – https://thevinylfactory.com/features/freaky-formats-moire-effect/ in which you’ll find other examples of mind-bending album cover designs from around for musical acts in many different genres.
Looking forward to seeing more as time goes on…

BTW – on a related note – I wanted to share a link I found to a music video released by the Rolling Stones which uses artwork appropriated (there’s that word again!) from on the cover art from Satanic Majesties..http://yespleaseproductions.com/portfolio/rolling-stones-2000-light-years-from-home-official-lyric-video/ A very good example of recycling…

d) While I’m happy to note that the sales of vinyl records continue to grow (my most-recent purchase was a special-edition 2-LP package of Brian Wilson and The Beach Boy’s Smile that came with a nice bonus photo booklet) as both us oldsters and our younger brethren preserve the format with our pennies and dollars, there are still occasional stories like the two that follow that provide us with the sad details about record stores closing both here and abroad, with each venue’s closing also taking with it the sale of related album art items (SAD!, as one Tweeter often puts it) –

1) Author has an idea on how to turn a store’s closing into something of a time capsule for retail record store fans – https://www.athensmessenger.com/blogs/guest_columnists/an-ode-to-hoffa-s-music/article_b8dfeb82-0e43-554c-847a-bfb79939bcf3.html

2) “Seeing the art of music” article by Kerry-Ann Augustin for the New Straits Times (Malaysia) – https://www.nst.com.my/lifestyle/sunday-vibes/2017/09/280707/seeing-art-music
We’ll keep the fire burning…

e) Some of you might recall a story I reported on a year ago about a trio of enterprising entrepreneurs, including noted album cover designer Lawrence Azerrad and his chums at Ozma Records to embark on a Kickstarter-based project that would produce, for us mortals, a special 40th anniversary, special-edition package based on the “Voyager Golden Record” that astronomer Carl Sagan, along with a team that included writers Timothy Ferris and Ann Druyan, artists Jon Lomberg and Linda Salzman Sagan and astronomer/SETI pioneer Frank Drake (who served as the technical director), assembled for the 1977 satellite launch in order to present “strange new civilizations” with evidence of our intelligence (this was, luckily for us, before we had recordings from this past year’s elections).

Well, I just recently got my own personal copy of this box set, which included and three translucent gold, heavyweight vinyl LPs in black ink and gold foil jackets, a hardback full-color book, a 12″ x 12″ lithograph of the Voyager Golden Record cover diagram printed in gold metallic ink, a digital download card that includes all audio from the Voyager Golden Record inMP3 and FLAC formats, an enamel pin of the Golden Record diagram and a custom turntable mat featuring NASA/JPL-Caltech’s heliocentric view of the Voyager spacecraft’s trajectories across the solar system (not bad for $98!), and all I can say is “WOW”.

And now that it’s been released and the second Voyager space craft is about to sail out of our solar system, I wanted to share a link to a follow-up article and interview with David Pescovitz found on the CNN.com site discussing the release of the special record package – http://www.cnn.com/2017/09/04/opinions/pescovitz-opinion/index.html

If so inclined, you can also listen to a BBC interview (on Soundcloud) that the folks from the record label posted last year with the original designer of the Golden Record – Jon Lomberg – which can be found via this link – https://soundcloud.com/user-482195982/interview-with-jon-lomberg?

f) A team of writers/contributors to Universal Music Group (UK)’s UDiscoverMusic.com site recently published one of those articles that undertakes the silly task of naming “the 25 most-iconic album covers” and, as my regular readers know, I typically HATE these lists. However, in this case, the group at least took some time to explain why each of the covers (all the usual suspects) was included and, to their credit, did NOT limit the list only to covers featured on their own labels.

Someday, I’ll have to learn what it is that motivates people to do articles like these but, until I’m ready to look into this further, I’ll just share the link and hope you’ll add your comments
https://www.udiscovermusic.com/stories/25-iconic-album-covers/

with some added info on designers – https://www.udiscovermusic.com/stories/iconic-album-cover-designers/

Late in September, the group’s Martin Chilton hit the web with another album art-related posting – https://www.udiscovermusic.com/stories/album-packaging-amplified-music/

g) While we’re on the topic of articles that seem to annoy me a lot…while I appreciate the sentiment, here’s a link to an article posted recently on the Ultimate Guitar site by contributor “David89Zemun” (from Belgrade, Serbia, who plays a modified Gibson Les Paul BFG and is a big Black Sabbath fan) titled “Stories Behind Album Covers – It Was Never Just About The Music…” in which he provides us with a nice selection of album covers – from artists ranging from Pink Floyd to Red Hot Chili Peppers – and then a very brief tidbit about the cover art, so when he tells us in his intro that “we will be getting into some of the most interesting stories behind album covers”, I’m not sure if he means now or later.

You won’t learn much, but it is nice to see young people from all over the world go out on a limb and do a little digging into their favorite album art – https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/articles/features/stories_behind_album_covers-67281

h) The phrase “sex and drugs and rock & roll” has often been brought to life via the choices made by musical acts/record labels/art directors to focus on the “sex” part to illustrate and sell their record packages. As you might figure, this didn’t sit well with many folks because, as you might have guessed, it was usually (99.3% of the time, according to my casual observations) women who were objectified on many covers and, later on, in music videos. Does this continue on these days? You betcha!

As you’ll read in reporter Sahsa Geffen’s article on the Vulture.com site, there has been a slight subversion of this ongoing practice, evidenced by the fact that some of the creators of this sexy imagery are, in fact, women, with the two newer acts she’s focused on – St. Vincent and Torres – both assuming “the role of objectifier and objectified at the same time. They confound the power that borders the history of the genre in which they work, not as an act of empowerment but as a gesture of sublime confusion. “
http://www.vulture.com/2017/09/st-vincent-and-torres-are-subverting-rock-archetypes.html
Kudos are given to Christopher Guest for his attempts to point out the “do what you gotta do” approach to selling records in his great mockumentary, This Is Spinal Tap…will things ever change? In today’s climate? I don’t think so….

i) In a recently-published series of articles on the Christie’s site about five London-area collectors and their assemblages, one of the featured collectors is designer/author Toby Mott, whose collection of punk-era ephemera and graphics served as the basis for the book he released last year (reported on in the Nov. 2016 News Summary) and includes original examples of album art by Jamie Reid and others. Of course, he can also look back proudly at his own album cover work – as part of the successful 1980s design firm and artist’s collective called the Grey Organization – for Tommy Boy Records and acts including De La Soul and Information Society – http://www.christies.com/features/5-London-collectors-and-their-collections-8553-1.aspx?

That’s all for now – be on the lookout for timely news alerts on our news feed –https://www.facebook.com/AlbumCoverHallOfFame – we’ll be back early next month with another monthly summary for you.

All text and images included in this article are Copyright 2017 Mike Goldstein and AlbumCoverHallofFame.com – All Rights Reserved. All of trade names mentioned in these summaries are the properties of their respective owners and are used for reference only.

Album Cover Artist and Art News Summary and Preview for August/September, 2017

ALBUM COVER HALL OF FAME’S ALBUM COVER NEWS RECAP FOR THE MONTH OF AUGUST, 2017, WITH PREVIEWS FOR SEPTEMBER, 2017.

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BY MIKE GOLDSTEIN, ALBUMCOVERHALLOFFAME.COM

Greetings once again to you all on this first day of September, 2017. Since we last spoke, there’s been both a major astronomical event (the 8/21 total solar eclipse) and a major – i.e., catastrophic – meteorological event (Hurricane Harvey) along with a very disturbing display in Virginia of how some folks here in the U.S. just can’t seem to bring themselves to fully share the advantages and opportunities afforded to us here so, when you look at how those events have impacted people in very real ways, I have to ask myself why I’m spending my time reporting on album art/artist-related news versus focusing my efforts on activities that might somehow change/improve the world and the lives of folks just trying to enjoy the little time we’re given here on Earth.

I wish I had a good answer for you, but I don’t.

I know that art and music can combine to make our lives better in so many ways, and I also know how much I appreciate the talents of the people who work to bring these bits of joy and beauty to us, so in spite of the fact that my writing and reporting will most-probably disappear into the Ether over time, the positive notes and responses I get from my readers continue to provide me with some incentive to continue on in this overall-trivial-but-sometimes-rewarding effort. However, if you want to REALLY do something that will help your fellow man in need in the best possible way, I would invite you to do as I’ve done and click on over to the American Red Cross site, where you can send a donation in support of those most in need right now – https://www.redcross.org/donate/hurricane-harvey

I’m hoping that you were able to read the article I posted in mid-August about my visit to the Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution exhibition currently running at the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center in Skokie, IL because, as you’ll see below, I’m adding some additional info and photos on the Baron Wolman photo event that took place there recently as well. I also had the chance to tour the Rolling Stones’ Exhibitionism extravaganza here right before it closed and would highly recommend it to anyone interested in seeing an amazing collection of Stones-related memorabilia and artwork (e.g., comps, alt takes and bits and pieces from “the making of” album covers including Exile On Main Street, Tattoo You and many others – very cool).

This month I also received the exciting news that the ALEX Awards show (named for the Godfather of album packaging and design, the late Alex Steinweiss) – a packaging industry awards show that’s been on hiatus for a number of years now – is being resurrected and will become part of a new show/symposium dedicated to all things vinyl record called “Making Vinyl” set for early November (Nov. 6-7) at the Westin Book Cadillac Hotel in Detroit, MI. Album cover creators will have the chance to submit examples of their recent work to a panel of esteemed judges (including well-respected designers and other music industry notables such as Spencer Drate, Judith Salavetz, Stefan Bucher, Gail Marowitz, Sean Mosher Smith, Sylvia Reed and Julian Alexander) for their review beginning September 1st and I’ll be posting more information very soon, so keep your eyes peeled…Online submission forms can be found at http://makingvinyl.com/alex-awards/

With regards to my book project, I am happy to be able to report that I have been able to gather some great new content from several new sources, including the highly-lauded design and writing team of Spencer Drate and Juditz Salavetz and a guy responsible for creating the what many consider to be “the templates” for in-your-face rap music album cover art, Shawn Brauch of Pen & Pixel fame. Of course, this only means that the project is getting even bigger/more time-consuming, so I’ll just leave it at that for now and will let you all know when things move forward on the design/publishing front…

For now, I’m just happy to be able to deliver the details of what’s going on in the lives and careers of the designers, artists, photographers and others who continue to produce great visuals for clients in the music business along with previews of what’s going to be on display and available for sale at your favorite gallery or museum next month. In the summary and via the links provided, you’ll learn more about the latest efforts of your favorite (and soon-to-be-favorite) album cover art creators and promoters that I’ve found in the daily news cycle, featuring fascinating and interesting stories on a wide range of related topics.

As always, I ask that you please share this info with everyone you know who are fans of great album cover-related talent and, of course, your comments and feedback are quite welcome.

1) Upcoming, recently-launched/currently running and just-closed show/exhibitions –

a)Earlier in August, I had the chance to tour the “Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution” event at the Illinois Holocaust Museum in Skokie, IL, with my full coverage (loaded with photos) posted on the ACHOF site at https://albumcoverhalloffame.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/achof-exhibition-tour-bill-graham-and-the-rock-roll-revolution/  As part of the ongoing series of events and other activities that the museum is putting on in support of their show, on Thursday, August 17th, they staged a special event that, as both a fan of rock and roll photography and a regular reader of Rolling Stone Magazine over the past 50 years (!!), was truly a special opportunity and something I just had to attend – a presentation by Baron Wolman, the magazine’s first photographer and a man who has captured scores of photos that have helped illustrate Rock’s “golden ages”.

The evening’s opening discussion was lead by Jason Marck, a local radio personality, who provided the photographer’s introduction and an occasional question during Wolman’s hour-long slide presentation. Even though Baron was suffering a bit from a sore throat caused by the after-effects of recent throat surgery, it did little to curb his enthusiasm to share some of the stories behind a nice selection of his best-known photographs and more info on his own personal story, including his early career as a photographer in the military (BTW, the first photo he sold was of the Berlin Wall while stationed in Germany) and, after returning to the States and landing in the San Francisco Bay area, his introductions to both Jann Wenner at the fledgling Rolling Stone publication and rock impresario Bill Graham, the man who provided Wolman with nearly un-fettered access to his venues and the acts that played there (including Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Bob Dylan & The Band, Santana and, of course, the Grateful Dead).

With influences including the great photographers Richard Avedon and Irving Penn, it was Wolman’s own keen eye and keen interest in all of the goings on behind the scenes of the events and personalities he covered (his fascination with 1960s-era “groupies” was shared later in a critically-acclaimed photo book of his on the subject) that keeps music/art fans yearning to add selections from Wolman’s fine art print portfolio to their own collections. There were number of those fans in the audience that night, and they streamed out after the final Q&A session to both meet the photographer at the book-signing table and, perhaps, grab a photo or two with their hero. The museum was offering those in attendance the opportunity to take home, as a bonus for joining/extending their memberships, a specially-created book featuring items from the Graham exhibition and I’m quite certain that a number of those books went home with their new owners featuring the signature of the man of the hour, the talented Mr. Wolman.

Just as a reminder, the Bill Graham exhibition is on display at the Illinois Holocaust Museum through November 12th, with more information available via the link – https://www.ilholocaustmuseum.org/billgraham/

b) Are YOU Experienced? Until you’ve seen the trippy photos taken by Karl Ferris for the cover of the Jimi Hendrix Experience record by that name up close and personal, you can’t really say that you are. Remember friends, this was way before computer-aided design and graphics, so in order to achieve the psychedelic final image, analog tools – fish eye lenses, infra-red film, etc. – had to be masterfully employed and, as you were able to see at two recent shows at the Morrison Hotel Galleries in NYC and Los Angeles (8/23 in NYC, 8/24 in LA), those now-50-year-old pix still grab you and blow your mind.

Karl also shot the photos used on the covers for two more Hendrix records – AXIS: Bold As Love and Electric Ladyland (replacing the image found on the UK version that Jimi really despised) and Hendrix once told Karl that he did with his camera what Jimi tried to do with his guitar, so how’s that for evidence of a good client relationship?

The photos featured in the Karl Ferris Psychedelic Experience were part of a larger show celebrating 50 years of mind-expanding imagery, including fine art works by Gered Mankowitz, Amalie Rothschild, Henry Diltz and several others –
https://www.morrisonhotelgallery.com/blog/5BfROu/Celebrating-iARE-YOU-EXPERIENCEDi

I also found a 2nd article, on Art Daily site, that gives readers a bit more of the background of these shows – http://artdaily.com/news/98318/Morrison-Hotel-Gallery-celebrates-the-era-of-psychedelia-with-an-exhibition-and-sale

The full show is up in the NYC gallery through September 6th, so if you’re in the area and have some ‘shrooms handy, experience the whole thing before it disappears in a puff of pink smoke…

c) Also on display from now through September 7th at the Mr. Musichead Gallery in Los Angeles is a 30th anniversary exhibition of images taken by photographer Chris Cuffaro – well-known to album cover fans for his contributions to the packaging of records by acts including Bad English, Suicidal Tendencies, Bush, Nick Cave and many others – taken during the making of a music video for a single by a band called Martini Ranch that was directed by the not-yet-quite-so-popular film-maker James Cameron.

Martini Ranch was a short-lived, semi-serious side project built around the talents of several musicians (including some members of bands such as DEVO, Frank Zappa’s band and film composer Mark Isham), and some people from the movie business, including the late actor Bill Paxton, who’d go on to star in a number of popular films. They released one album – 1988’s Holy Cow, which featured quirky cover art by the acclaimed artist Lou Beach – and to make the video for the song “Reach”, the group brought in a bunch of friendlies from the music and film world, including Judge Reinhold, Paul Reiser and Cameron’s soon-to-be-wife, fellow director Kathryn Bigelow.

Given free rein to shoot the entire cast and crew while this video was being made, you’ll get to see a lot of people having a lot of fun for two days out at the Veluzat Motion Picture Ranch in Saugus, California.
https://www.mrmusichead.com/events/2017/8/30/chris-cuffaro-greatest-hits-martini-ranch

d) With the voting for this year’s Best Art Vinyl Awards almost upon us (beginning in November, with the winners announced next January), in anticipation of the presentation of this year’s nominees and subsequent voting, the folks behind this annual event will be staging presentations of recent winners and nominees in three locations in Europe (is the U.K. still “Europe” – please explain) all starting with the letter “B” – Barnsley (UK), Bologna (Italy) and Budapest (Hungary) later this year. Best Art Vinyl: 12 Years on 12 Inches will put the works of many talented album cover artists on display, including last year’s winner – illustrator/designer Matthew Cooper’s cover for The Last Shadow Puppets’ long-awaited 2nd album Everything You’ve Come to Expect.
The writers at Digital Arts Online provide us with a preview of the upcoming displays and voting –
http://www.digitalartsonline.co.uk/news/illustration/best-album-art-2017-nominees-past-winners-of-best-art-vinyl-awards-be-exhibited/

e) Now on display at the Museum of Pop Culture (formerly, the EMP) in Seattle is a photo exhibition of 65 images selected by British shooter Mick Rock from the over 5000 he took of David Bowie from March 1972 to November of 1973 as he morphed into his Ziggy Stardust personality and helped establish the bona fides of the “glam rock” movement. Gillian G. Gaar’s coverage of the show, as featured in Goldmine Magazinehttp://www.goldminemag.com/articles/photographer-mick-rock-exhibits-bowie – provides us with a good intro to this long-lasting relationship between rock star and his friend/artist Rock, with more info on the details of the show available on the MOPOP site at https://www.mopop.org/exhibits/current-exhibits/bowie-by-mick-rock/
Later on in this summary, in Section 5, you’ll also find a related article about the premiere of the documentary film about Rock…

f) Genesis Publication’s Genesis House Gallery will be hosting a very special reception on September 9th featuring famed Beatles designer/bassist Klaus Voorman as they honor the release of his brand new collage created to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the band’s seminal record, Revolver.
According to the gallery’s press release, “We will have an installation of Klaus’s latest work, the Revolver 50 collage series, alongside his earlier Hamburg Days prints and other artworks. The occasion also marks 50 years since Klaus won the Grammy Award for the Revolver album design, so we will be joined by some special guests to celebrate this achievement, and hope you will be able to join us.” I’d love to, of course, but there’s some water in the way…
http://www.genesis-publications.com/revolver-50-the-collage-series-by-klaus-voormann/default.htm?

g) Now I know that I’m getting old – 40 years, really? Yes, friends, it’s been 40 years since we first had our terminals fizzed by Manchester-area punkers The Buzzcocks and our eyes burned to cinders by Malcolm Garrett’s subversive designs for the band (remember the cover for the single “Orgasm Addict” with the iron-headed reclining nude?). Garrett went on to design memorable covers for musical acts including Peter Gabriel, Simple Minds, Duran Duran and many others, and has shared his love of design with clients (via his in-demand agency, IMAGES & Co.) and students of design via his participation in industry events, showcases and committees such as the BAFTA Interactive Entertainment Committee, the Royal Designers for Industry (RDI) Executive Committee, the i-Design interactive media conference held at the London Design Festival and as co-curator of the annual Design Manchester festival.

To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the release of the first designs for the influential band, Garrett will be leading a presentation/discussion at this year’s Design Manchester event, described here on the festival’s web site – http://designmcr.com/events/fizzing-at-the-terminals-malcolm-garretts-buzzcocks-designs-1977-2017 and, if you’re in the area, something I’d invite you to sign up for…

What really makes me wonder is that you can buy t-shirt with these early and then-controversial designs at Wal-Mart now…OMG!

2) Artist interviews/profile articles –

a) While artist Sir Peter Blake, one of the UK’s best-known talents, might be most-recognized for his work on the cover for what’s often considered one of the best album covers ever created – the collage found on the package for 1967’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band by The Beatles – it doesn’t take a lot of work to see that that cover was just one of a huge portfolio of images he’s created over the 85 years he’s been on the planet. His paintings and other works have long been considered amongst the very best in the fine art world but, as you’ll see in this nicely-written profile by Abigail Cain found recently on the Artsy.com site, interviews and conversations about and with the artist inevitably hearken back to his work for The Beatles.
https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-beatles-helped-british-artist-perfect-work-pop-art

Today’s young artists have, fortunately, taken the time to look at and learn from Blake’s long list of important works of art, so he seems content to know that he’ll be remembered not just for the work that he and his team (artist Jann Haworth and photographer Michael Cooper) were given the amazingly meager sum of £200 (not including flowers and wax/cutout figures) to create…

b) Writing for VICE, Clara Mokri interviews photographer Brad Elterman as he looks back on his career as a young rock photographer via the discovery and purchase (thanks, eBay!) of a trove of long-lost photos taken early on in his career. Parlaying the sale of his candid shots of David Bowie to Creem Magazine back in the early 1970s into a career that’s brought us scores of great photos of rockers such as Joan Jett, Peter Frampton, Talking Heads, KISS, The Who (and shots that have been included in packages for AC/DC. Alice Cooper and the Eagles) and others, Brad shares the story about how his archive was lost-then-found and the emotions he feels taking a long look at his work all these years later.
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/zmepp8/this-teen-took-candid-photos-of-the-70s-biggest-rock-stars

c) You all know Ron Pownall’s work – covers for albums by Ted Nugent, Boston, Aerosmith, Molly Hatchet and dozens more – but how often do you get a chance to take a tour through an accomplished photographer’s studio? Luckily, reporter Emily Cassell was able to snag such a tour, sharing it with us on the Scout Somerville (MA) website – http://scoutsomerville.com/ron-pownall/

Beginning his photo career as a young shooter for the Chicago Tribune newspaper in the late 1960s, he went from covering protests of the Vietnam War to concert events at local venues and, when he relocated from the Windy City to Boston in the early 1970s, his abilities brought him assignments to document the visits of bands including Boston, Queen and others and it was “off to the races”…

d) On NZ’s Stuff Entertainment site, Mike Alexander delivers a profile of Barry Beswick and his Indium Design company, perhaps best-known for his dozens of covers (the last 37 of them, as a matter of fact) created for the seemingly-never-ending series of top hits packages known as “Now That’s What I Call Music.”
https://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/95241857/now-thats-what-i-call-album-artwork
Now, that’s what you call a GREAT commission!

e) Parlaying his love of music – exemplified by his collection of bootleg recordings – and his desire to improve the visuals usually associated with those illicit products into a career as an illustrator for the Trademark of Quality label and then, later on for legit label Rhino Records (where he designed their mascot/logo), cartoonist William Stout would then go on to greater fame as a designer of movie posters, film and TV productions and, more recently, a series of music-related books/graphic novels.
And he had me at Little Annie Fanny
Fans should take the time to read Joshua Stone’s profile of the prolific and talented illustrator in a recent issue of Bleeding Coolhttps://www.bleedingcool.com/2017/07/22/william-stout-career-envy/

f) As he’s going to be a speaker at the upcoming 2017 AIGA Design Conference in Minneapolis, MN (October 12-14), the folks behind the event have just posted an interview with artist Michael Cina, someone who is no stranger to us album art fans as he’s credited with dozens of designs for Pop, Rock and Electronic acts including Jacaszek, Matrixxman, Shigeto, Arthur Beatrice and many others – http://designconference.aiga.org/#!/article/michael-cina-discusses-his-career-journey

As both a freelancer and, since 2010, the principal at Cina Associates, Michael has done work – design, art direction, typography and web work – for a who’s who of happy clients including Pepsi, Coca-Cola, Disney, Fox Sports, RedBull and many others.

Looking through the list of speakers lined up for this conference, I also wanted you to know that two other well-regarded album art designers – Pentagram’s Paula Scher and Draplin Design Co’s Aaron Draplin (go, Portland!) – will be on hand to share their innermost thoughts and feelings about design with an audience thirsting for their knowledge…

3) Sales/Auctions –

Nothing exciting to report at this point….

4) New Print/Book RELEASES –

a) Rock N Roll Cultural Historian and Fandom Expert Dr. Jennifer Otter Bickerdike (@JenOtterBickerd) has a new book out (September 1st in the UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Why-Vinyl-Matters-Manifesto-Musicians/dp/185149863X) that looks to be required reading for anyone who is a lover of recorded music delivered on vinyl records (an ever-growing population of you, it seems!) and it includes, as I’ve heard from Jen, a fair amount of content that should be of interest specifically to us album art fans as well.

The book’s titled Why Vinyl Matters: A Manifesto From Musicians and Fans and, according to the accompanying press info, it is “a bold declaration of love for pre-digital music technology – part history, part future forecasting, part nostalgia and all celebration. A collection of more than 25 interviews, all illustrated with photos, sidebars, quotes, album covers, outtakes and much more” and includes discussions with musicians Lars Ulrich (Metallica), Henry Rollins (Black Flag and his own band), Mike Ness (Social Distortion), Steve Hackett (Genesis) and many others, along with several with top album cover designers including Peter Saville, Steve Park and Alison Fielding.

An academic, writer and historian now based in the U.K. and who has written several other books on the topics of music and Pop Culture (Joy Devotion: The Importance of Ian Curtis and Fan Culture (2016), The Secular Religion of Fandom: Pop Culture Pilgrim (2015) and 2014’s Fandom, Image and Authenticity (Pop Music, Culture and Identity), Jennifer “remains enthralled by vinyl, and has embarked on a journey to share her passion – and the passion of like-minded stars – with the world.”

Bonus Content – I asked Jen if she’d be willing to share some quotes from the album cover artists with me (and you) and she was kind enough to provide the following:
“I have Peter Saville and Steve Park. Peter has done TONS AND TONS of covers and Steve is most famous for Prince’s Graffiti Bridge (he was Prince’s creative director for years, and a super cool dude too)! Oh, and Alison Fielding, who does all of the creative for Beggars Banquet! “

Just as a teaser, here’s a quote she sent from her interview with Peter Saville – “There is no problem associated with a record cover other than the principle artist liking it. It doesn’t matter: what is on a record cover does not matter. Unlike any other form of packaging or communication. Nobody has NOT bought a record they wanted because they did not like the cover. They may sometimes be influenced to buy a record that they are indecisive about because they like the cover. But if there is a song, a track – something you like – you have never not bought it because of the cover. So, therefore, it does not really matter. But one thing does matter. The principle artist. Because if Bryan, Brett, Madonna, George is not happy – then the release is delayed. And it has got to happen quickly. It is always late. It is always left to the last minute; there are always last minute changes… It always goes to the wire. And at the 11th hour, management, record companies, cave in and say, ‘You know, we don’t fucking care. Just get it approved.’ And the person it has to be approved by is the principle ego. That is how it works.”

b) Back in June/July, I told you about a show featuring photographer Markus Klinko’s beautiful shots of the late David Bowie (“Bowie Unseen”, on display as part of the HeadOn Photo Festival in Sydney, Australia), but I’m now happy to report that those of us stranded here in the U.S. now have a place to find (and buy) many of the same photos featured in that exhibition – Modern Rocks Gallery in Austin, TX. If you follow the link – https://www.modernrocksgallery.com/markus-klinko-photographer – you’ll get a chance to see what’s available, including Klinko’s cover shots for Heathen – the record where Bowie works with Klinko to craft a photo where the subject (Bowie) is quite obviously blind.

c) Going back a bit – i.e., to the beginning – of Mr. Bowie’s career, you’ll learn that it was Gerald Fearnley, brother of Dek Fearnley (one of Bowie’s bandmates at the time), who shot the cover photo used for Bowie’s debut album in 1967 (David Bowie). Digging into that archive, Mr. Fearnley has now put together a new book of those photos also titled Bowie Unseen (?), published by ACC Editions – https://www.accpublishinggroup.com/uk/store/pv/9781851498642/bowie-unseen/gerald-fearnley/

After capturing the eye of the folks at CNN Style, you can now see a bit more about this new book and what’s included – http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/31/arts/unseen-david-bowie-portraits/index.html

5) Other articles of interest –

a) Flying saucer-leaning music lovers will have a lot to celebrate soon when, on Friday, September 29th, a very special 40th anniversary vinyl picture disc package (featuring Kosh’s original artwork) of ELO’s 2-LP set Out of The Blue is being released by Sony Music’s Legacy Recordings. Two LPs = four different designs, and, for the approx. $35 they’ll pay, customers will also receive the music in digital download form – https://www.legacyrecordings.com/2017/07/27/legacy-recordings-release-first-time-ever-picture-disc-edition-elos-blue/

Pre-orders now being accepted – https://store-us.jefflynneselo.com/products/out-of-the-blue-picture-disc-2lp

Believe me now, sweet is the night – even if I’m standing in the rain in the summer and lightning – that this package arrives on my doorstep…

b) Later on in this month’s summary, you’ll read my rant about “best of/worst of” lists (I don’t particularly like them) but, from time to time, someone will come up with a novel take on the topic and, although it disturbs me to my very core, I’ll pass it on to you, my readers. Recently, Dan Caffrey and the staffers of the Consequence of Sound site put their heads together to come up with a somewhat different approach to a “Top 50” listing – the 50 “most outrageous” album covers ever made –
https://consequenceofsound.net/2017/07/the-50-most-outrageous-album-covers/

According to the article, rather than focusing on the good or the bad, the writers “simplified the criteria: It should be something that makes you scratch your head and say, ‘Huh?’” The article also begins with a warning – “Some of these you won’t be able to ‘unsee,’ so proceed with caution” and, after paging through several of them (starting off with Queen’s disturbing cover for The Miracle in which the band members’ faces are grafted together to make one quite-large head), it’s probably a warning well-heeded (although some of the selections are merely from the psychedelic era and, therefore, just images you can trip on)…

c) Lots of Bowie and Mick Rock this issue, no? Take an interesting and iconoclastic photographer/partier and introduce him to several rock & rollers eager to test out their new-found fame and wealth (and mix in examples of said photographer’s famous imagery and voila!, you have the beginnings of an interesting documentary film. Now available for viewing is the new Mick Rock bio-pic – Shot! – and The Guardian (UK)’s film reviewer Leslie Felperin provides us with a first look at it – https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/jul/21/shot-the-psycho-spiritual-mantra-of-rock-review-mick-rock-photography

d) I’m very happy to have been able to tour through Takashi Murakami’s latest show (The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg, on now through September 24th at the Museum of Contemporary Art here in Chicago) because, while I might not be Kanye’s biggest fan, I do appreciate his selection of Murakami as his album cover artist back in 2008 for his Graduation record and it was fun to see the original cover art included in the show.

In a recent posting on the Uproxx.com site, reporter Corbin Reiff shared a scoop that hints at the possibility that another Kanye friend/collaborator – Kid Kudi – might be looking for a Murakami-designed cover for his new project.
love fest – http://uproxx.com/realtalk/kanye-west-graduation-bear-kid-cudi-japan-new-album-speculation/

e) Any serious student of the album cover arts knows and appreciates the impact that the team from the Hipgnosis design studio has had since they began applying their talents to packages for Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Genesis, Black Sabbath and scores of others since the late 1960s. And while I might not be so willing as to declare all great album art as either being “before Hipgnosis” or “after Hipgnosis” (let’s see – Revolver, Sgt. Pepper’s, Disraeli Gears, Are You Experienced?, etc. all came before…) as writer Nick DeRiso has stated in an article called “32 Weird Facts About Hipgnosis’ Most Famous Rock Album Covers,” I do want to reward the guy for doing a bit of research and then presenting these fun facts in a highly-entertaining fashion. Did YOU know that the cover for Pink Floyd’s Saucer Full of Secrets was made with 13 layers of imagery (pre-Photoshop, mind you) and that this cover project was only the second time in EMI’s history that they allowed the work to be contributed by an outside agency (the first being Peter Blake’s work for the aforementioned Sgt. Pepper’s cover)? Well, neither did I – http://ultimateclassicrock.com/hipgnosis-album-covers/

f) Haters gotta hate hate hate – While some of us worry that album cover design is often over-looked and under-appreciated in today’s fast-paced, digitally-distributed world, when you’re a mega-star like Taylor Swift and you tease your fanbase with album art for your upcoming release (titled Reputation) that reminds some people of that decoupage project you did at Summer Camp in 7th grade, you have to expect that some folks aren’t going to respond positively (as detailed recently in Brian Koerber’s article on the Mashable site) – http://mashable.com/2017/08/23/taylor-swift-album-cover-graphic-design/
Perhaps she should call up her buddy Kanye and get a meeting with Murakami?

g) With the national pastime for “connected” folks seemingly now being freely telling the world just how much you hate someone/something, it only makes sense that some writers feel that it is their duty to share their until-now-repressed feelings with their readership, so why not highlight what are, according to reporter Joseph Earp on the Tonedeaf.com site, the “worst album covers of all time”?

Why do people do these articles? While no one was killed in the making of these images, it seems as though they did upset his little tummy.
http://tonedeaf.com.au/7-worst-album-covers-of-all-time/

Stop with the “worst of all time” lists, everyone, OK?

Bonus – With Pen & Pixel’s design for Big Bear’s Doin’ Thangs leading the list (with the author commenting “it is without a doubt one of the most hideous things I have seen in the last few years”), I felt that I should get designer Shawn Brauch’s take on this award. Based on his reply, this is obviously not the first time he’s been dissed by the press but, like any controversial artist, he takes it in stride – “Mike – Oh that one is RICH! LOL! Got to love the artwork, even when it’s criticized, they still love to hate it. The great thing is, when the ‘critics’ start to take a long detailed look at the craftsmanship…they always applaud that aspect…what more can we say? LOL! I’ve read past posts about have God-awful the artwork was, in the same sentence touting the number of records sold with the same artwork…like there is no correlation between the two. I’m laughing my A** off!”

That’s all for now – be on the lookout for timely news alerts on our news feed –https://www.facebook.com/AlbumCoverHallOfFame – we’ll be back early next month with another monthly summary for you.

All text and images included in this article are Copyright 2017 Mike Goldstein and AlbumCoverHallofFame.com – All Rights Reserved. All of trade names mentioned in these summaries are the properties of their respective owners and are used for reference only.

Album Cover News Recap for January, 2016

Album Cover Hall of Fame’s Album Cover News Recap for the month of January, 2016

It’s early February 2016 and, while we here in the Pacific NW continue to endure a mostly-dreary Winter season (sun lamps are hot sellers here), we must consider ourselves lucky considering the bashing that many other areas of the country have been getting. And, while the circus sideshow we call “politics” continues to grab much of our attention these days, your Curator (hey, that’s me!) has been fortunate enough to tour art exhibitions in Los Angeles, Palm Springs and here in Portland, where the 2016 Print Fair was held this past weekend at the Portland Art Museum – lots of great art was seen and appreciated – yes, there is an art world beyond Album Cover-land!

My travels did, of course, slightly reduce the number of days I was able to share the latest album art-related news with you (and, even with a Leap Day added, this will occur again naturally in February), but the steady stream of album art-related news remained unabated, with the ACHOF news feed showcasing the many exhibitions, books and other such activities we reported on during the last 30 days. With stories on the interviews, features, profiles, gallery/museum shows and annual  “best and worst” lists adding to the impressive number  of exciting and inspiring articles you found in our news feed, I’ll now spend just a few paragraphs giving you a summary of these highlights and updates. After that,  it’ll be up to you  to visit our site to complete your re-reading of these items of interest on this list by reading/viewing these items at your leisure… Continue reading

Album Cover News Recap for October, 2015

Album Cover Hall of Fame’s Album Cover News Recap – November 2, 2015

By Mike Goldstein, AlbumCoverHallofFame.com

It’s early November, 2015 and we’re heading into the late Fall season here in the Pacific NW – great hiking and sleeping-with-the-windows-open weather, with wonderful colors found all around, including in the many exhibitions, books and the like we reported on during the last 30 or so days. With stories featuring new interviews, features, book releases, gallery/museum shows and three new films adding to the pure joy found in our news feeds, I’ll spend a few paragraphs giving you a summary of these highlights and updates but, after that,  it’ll be up to you  to complete your review of this list by reading/viewing these items at your own pace…

Lots of interesting interviews this past month – both in print and on video – with the talented men and women who’ve enriched our lives by creating memorable  album cover art, including artist of the macabre Jeff Gaither, art directors Mike Salisbury, Kosh and David Larkham, illustrators Shepard Fairey and Tony Quick (for the NEW Zombies LP) and singer/songwriter/painter John Mellencamp.

In the fine art book category, there was news of new and upcoming book releases from photographer/collector Raj Prem, the aforementioned Shepard Fairey, photographer Jay Blakesberg (a book titled Hippie Chicks) and videographer/vinly lover Eilon Paz, who brings his Dust And Grooves series from video to print.

There were a large number of exhibitions and shows built around rock-related imagery that premiered during October, with shows in museums and galleries around the world displaying collections that show a broad range of album art and related imagery. You’ll read more about current and just-completed exhibits such as the show at Hilton|Asmus in Chicago featuring photos by Henry Diltz, Carinthia West and Pattie Boyd, Neal Preston’s recent display at the LDI convention, the “Hippie Modernism” show at the Walker Art Center, a show of Michael Cooper photos in London, Graham Nash’s new display at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Winston Smith’s collage show in San Francisco, musician/artist Wayne Coyne’s display in Baltimore and a show featuring “make believe” album art in New Haven, CT.

Other interesting articles appeared on subjects including the now-open voting for Art Vinyl’s yearly “Best Art Vinyl” awards, album art created by working musicians, a clothing license deal that will produce gear featuring 80’s style/art icon Patrick Nagel’s artwork,  a scientific study into whether album cover art influences the reviews by music critics and three films – Roddy Bogawa’s look into the life and career of the late Storm Thorgerson called Taken By Storm (covers for Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin and many others), one about photographer Robert Frank (Exile On Main Street for the Rolling Stones) and Colin Hanks & Co’s loving tribute to the life and death of that former temple of all things vinyl – Tower Records – titled All Things Must Pass. As it typically the case, I don’t have the time/space to include everything in this summary, so please take a moment to dig through the rest of what’s below – I’m sure you’ll find something that stimulates your interest!

We’re going into the annual voting season for the ACHOF and, as part of that effort, I’ve added  several new biographies to the Artist Bios section on the ACHOF site during the month. With our next class set to be inducted before the Holidays this year, I’m working to include as many as possible for consideration in this effort. With all of the year-end distractions soon upon us , I’m going to do what I can to help you in your efforts to catch up on recent news you may have missed but,  as I repeat (incessantly, I know) every month, regardless of how hectic your lives may be, there’s no reason that you should go without getting yourselves up-to-date info on one of your favorite topics, so you can be sure that we’ll continue to work every day (except weekends) to prove to you that there’s always something new to see and learn in the world of album cover art, and you know that you’ll find it all here on the ACHOF site (keep your eye on our News Feed for the latest updates).

October 31st – not posted, but added today as a bonus – Bay-area photographer Jim Jocoy has dug deep into his archives and found a collection of late 1970s shots of a “who’s who” in the then-thriving punk music scene (previously publishing some of them in a book titled We’re Desperate: The Punk Rock Photography of Jim Jocoy) and now, in this recent article by Miss Rosen on the Crave Online site, sharing even more of them, including images of Patti Smith, Penelope Houston of The Avengers, Exene Cervenka of X and many other stars of the era. His observation that “Punk is an ephemeral thing. The Rolling Stones are still rolling along, and the Ramones are all gone”, while stating the obvious, certainly underlines the fact that so much of this creative energy has “left the club”… http://www.craveonline.com/art/909159-girls-film-70s-punk-legends-photographs-jim-jocoy#/slide/1

October 30th – 1) Perfectly-timed for a Halloween-weekend item was this just-released feature/interview with artist Jeff Gaither. Fans of album art will recognize his work for metal/hard rock bands including Testament, Pantera, The Misfits, Guns-n-Roses, The Undead and many others (over 200 credits!) but, as you’ll see when you read Kevin Gibson’s article on the LEO Weekly (Louisville, KY) site, the inspirations for the sometimes over-the-top ghoulishness of his imagery come from a fascination of all things serial killer (he even owns a piece of notorious murderer Ed Gein’s tombstone). When you’re done with the article, I’d also suggest a visit to Jeff’s site, where you can learn more about his past, including his five-year stint working for Mr. Rat Fink himself, Ed “Big Daddy” Roth – http://www.leoweekly.com/2015/10/serial-killer-culture-jeff-gaithers-dark-obsession-inspires-his-art-and-fandom/
Site link – www.jeffgaither.com

2) The folks at the Hilton|Asmus Gallery in Chicago have decided to extend the time that their popular photo show based around the photography of Henry Diltz, Pattie Boyd and Carinthia West will be up…Visions Of A Magic Time:Iconic Photographs Of The Music & Culture Of The 60s And 70s will be available for viewing now through December 20th. They also sent over a link to a recent episode of the popular “A Drink With…” web series (sponsored by Virgin Hotels and hosted by Hilary Sawchuck) in which Ms. Sawchuck hoists a margarita or two with the three aforementioned photographers while they talk about the behind-the-scenes details of many of their best-known images and Ms. Boyd (the former muse of rockers George Harrison and Eric Clapton) talks a bit about the ups and downs of being in love…

http://virginhotels.com/2015/10/09/a-drink-with-pattie-boyd-carinthia-west-henry-diltz/

Exhibition info – http://www.hiltonasmusfoto.com/exhibition-schedule.html

October 29th – 1) Album art fans in the New Haven, CT area were treated to an exhibit featuring 67 works of art depicting album covers for “make believe bands” called “Sound + Vision: A Visual Playlist” that ran at the Gallery at the Institute Library, 847 Chapel St., until Oct. 31. This portion of the city-wide “Open Studios” effort showed how local artists would approach projects designed to best-introduce fans to an act’s new music (“you don’t get a second chance to make a first impression”), with some of the participants reaching back into the area’s musical history (e.g., a visit by The Doors in 1967 during which Jim Morrison was arrested for various acts of debauchery) to provide the bases for the visual imagery. From 7 to 10 p.m. on Oct. 31, there was a closing party with album sales, auction results, and a live broadcast on local radio station WPKN, so if you would like to learn more, read Brian Slattery‘s article on the topic on the New Haven Independent site –http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/sound_vision/

2) Music journalist, photographer, collector and curator Raj Prem has just announced that he’s working on a book chronicling both his own career as a rock photojournalist and working alongside other leading rock shooters – including Michael Cooper, Iain Macmillan, Robert Freeman, Jerry Schatzberg and many others – to curate gallery/museum shows of their works. He’s staged over 100 shows during the last 20 years, so the book will most-certainly include an interesting mix of behind-the-scenes story-telling, interviews and anecdotes. I hope to get hold of the nice man ASAP to see if I can find out more about when he anticipates he’ll release his newest tome but, in the meantime, you can learn more about the man and his plans on his website via the link – http://rajpremnews.com/2015/10/raj-prem-to-publish-new-book-about-his-career-in-music-photography/

October 28th – 1) Ever wonder what your favorite album covers would have looked like translated (literally) into proper French? Me neither – but now that I see them, I’m glad that London-based creative Thomas Olivier has taken the time to provide them to us! I’m particularly amused by several of them, including the newly-revised covers for The Who (“Les Qui”), Talking Heads (“Tetes Parlantes”) and James Brown’s “Sois Sur Ton Bon Pied“. See the rest in this recent article by Ana Leorne on the FourOhFive (is that L’Interstate 405?) site –http://www.thefourohfive.com/culture/article/here-are-some-of-the-world-s-most-famous-record-covers-in-french-144 

2) Influential graphic designer/photographer Mike Salisbury has had his hand in so many well-known images – including album covers for Ike & Tina Turner, George Harrison, James Taylor and Michael Jackson, among others, along with notable design elements for over 300 films (the Jurassic Park logo, for example) – that he most-certainly can claim to have had a notable effect on what Pop Culture “looks like”, but in this recent interview/profile of the artist by Mary Reinholz for The Argonaut site, readers will learn about aspects of his career that will both impress you and leave you wondering (Pop Culture being birthed by the CIA? He says he’s got the proof). I’m eagerly anticipating the release of his series on the topic titled “Mr. Pop Culture” but, in the meantime you can learn more via the link – http://argonautnews.com/mad-dog-sees/
I’d also invite you to view a short video that shows a number of the portraits he’s taken of celebrities from all aspects of Pop Culture via this link –https://youtu.be/l8bg6e3becc

October 27th – 1) In the third installment in his series for Rolling Stone Magazine, Bob Egan talks to photographer Jerry Schatzberg about “the making of” the cover image for Bob Dylan’s Blonde On Blonde (you know, the “fuzzy cover”!). One interesting thing you’ll learn when you read Bob’s article is that while many tried to attribute the slightly-out-of-focus nature of the image to an attempt to appeal to recreational drug users, the real reason Jerry gives is that it was February, they were outside and it was COLD! Schatzberg is also responsible for a number of other well-known album cover images, including photos for Aretha Franklin, Sonny & Cher, The Rascals and my personal favorite, the wonderful Beatle-esque spoof created for Frank Zappa & The Mothers’ We’re Only In It For The Moneyhttp://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/see-dylan-photographer-explain-blurry-blonde-on-blonde-cover-20151027

2) Fans of the fantastic art of Roger Dean have another week to view the exhibition currently on display at the Trading Boundaries Gallery in Sheffield Green, East Sussex, UK titled Roger Dean:Somewhere Near Here. You’ll find original paintings, watercolors, sketches and other samples of the artist’s work on display, including art he’s done for YES, Steve Hackett’s Premonitions and more, including items related to the art he produced for the epic 14 CD box set recently released by YES called Progeny (with each disc sporting a unique Dean image). You can also sign up to attend a November 1st workshop with Dean where he’ll discuss his efforts for clients in the music, film and video game worlds – a chance to learn from “the master” of Prog Rock design – more info on the show (which ends its run November 3rd) on the gallery’s site at http://www.tradingboundaries.com/roger-dean/

3) Regular readers will recall an article a while back about the major travelling show being produced by the Rolling Stones that will feature over 50 years of band-related art and artifacts, set to launch next Spring at the Saatchi Gallery in London. Titled The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism, the show ” will use nine rooms amounting to over 1,750 square meters of the gallery, with each room its own distinctly designed environment. Guitarist Ronnie Wood said: ‘Let’s gather things together and let people have an experience in a well designed space’” Tickets are now on sale for the show’s first run from April thru September 2016, with the folks from the DIY Magazine site providing us with a bit more info in this recent post on their site – http://diymag.com/2015/10/21/a-look-inside-the-rolling-stones-exhibitionism

October 26th –  1) According to the research scientists at Lixar, album cover imagery has very little influence on whether a record will receive a good or bad review from critics. The company was commissioned by the Halifax Music Explosion to study this question and, as part of the process, used complicated software to study 1000 record cover images, calculate what makes them similar or unique to others, and then determine if patterns arose that would then be reflected in whether a record was well-regarded (or not). As you’ll read in Remo Zaccagna’s article on The Chronicle Herald (Canada) web site, the results showed that cover art had a <3% chance of effecting the outcome of a review. I’m going to follow up with the players in this study to see if they have any notion as to whether album art influenced consumer buying decisions – I think that most of us would say “yes” (at least on purchases made in the pre-digital-download time frame). More to come – in the meantime, click on over to learn more –http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/1318508-music-not-art-influences-critics-lixar-study-concludes

2) While businesses of all types today use data visualization tools to help translate sophisticated data sets into something that mere mortals can understand, did you know that one of the best-known album covers of all time – Joy Division’s Unknown Pleasures, with design/art by Peter Saville) was based on a stacked plot diagram made during scientific study of pulsars nearly 50 years ago? You did? What a show-off 🙂 In a recent article by Jen Christiansen for Scientific American, you’ll more (and I mean, a LOT more) about these studies and the science that lead up to the image that was originally included in a PhD research paper published in 1970 by radio astronomer Harold Craft. http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/sa-visual/pop-culture-pulsar-the-science-behind-joy-division-s-unknown-pleasures-album-cover/

3) Digging through the shelves of my local public library this past weekend lead me to find two books on album art that I wasn’t familiar with previously – Coast To Coast Album Covers: Classic Record Art from New York To LA by authors Graham Marsh and Glyn Callingham was published in 2011 by Collins & Brown (UK) and shows the earlier works of many rock/Pop album cover designers for a number of jazz/popular music labels in the 1950s-60s, while DIY Album Art: Paper Bags And Office Supplies (by J. Namdev Hardisty) focuses on the often hand-made covers created by indie/punk labels beginning in the 1990s. Even the book’s cover looks hand-made, featuring litho art on thick cardboard. You’ll find more details on this page on the ACHOF site –https://albumcoverhalloffame.wordpress.com/achof-resources-page-intro-and-links-to-album-cover-books-and-sites/

October 23rd –  1) Visitors to the Live Design International Trade Show in Las Vegas that weekend had the chance to tour an exhibition of the work of photographer Neal Preston, the man responsible for a host of well-known album cover images, including those for acts including Tom Petty, Bruce Springsteen, Heart, Peter Frampton, Alice Cooper and many others. Sponsored by stage lighting company Lightpower, “In the Eye of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hurricane” will showcase Preston’s covers, concert photos and portraits, with the photographer on hand all weekend to talk about his work, making this an even more-exciting opportunity. Read more about this show in this intro article on the Live Design Online site –
http://livedesignonline.com/ldi/ldi-and-act-lighting-present-eye-rock-n-roll-hurricane

2) The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, MN has a new exhibit that presents – through examples of art (including images created by several of the better-known poster/album artists of the era), design, architecture and other popular culture artifacts – how the counter-culture of the late 1960s – early 1970s impressed itself on all aspects of life at the time. Beginning October 24th and running there through Feb. 28th of next year, “Hippie Modernism; The Struggle For Utopia” puts on display ” a broad range of art forms and artifacts of the era” and “features experimental furniture, alternative living structures, immersive and participatory media environments, alternative publishing and ephemera, and experimental film. Bringing into dramatic relief the limits of Western society’s progress, the exhibition explores one of the most vibrant and inventive periods of the not-too-distant past, one that still resonates within culture today.” The show is curated by Andrew Blauvelt, with more info available on the museum’s site at http://www.walkerart.org/calendar/2015/hippie-modernism-struggle-utopia.

3) Is using samples/stock items to create music and/or album art a new form of creativity or simply a way for the less-talented to quickly craft a new work? This seems to be the focus of a new article by Caitlin Lopilato on the Complex.com site titled “Is Using Stock Imagery As Album Art Cheating?” and, based on the comments she’s collected from a number of established designers – including Jonathan Mannion, HK and Kalen Hollomon – the discussion about what makes art of any type “original” remains one that will be batted back and forth for a long time. Sparked by the recent admission that the covers for two of rapper Future’s latest releases were made from stock photography, the author reaches her own conclusion that “the Internet is cutting them out of the equation, and their creative voices are being muffled by the temptation of copying and pasting.” What’s your take on the subject? Read more at http://www.complex.com/style/2015/10/hip-hop-album-art-stock-images

Bonus content: Famed cover artist David Larkham shared this link to an interview he participated in with one of his clients (retailer J.J. Hapgood) that, to me, nicely illustrates the “international-ness” of design – a U.K. artist creating compelling imagery for a client he’d originally met in California 30+ years ago who now runs a store/eatery in Peru (O.K., Peru, Vermont!). Larkham, who has done covers for top musical acts including Elton John, David Bowie, the Rolling Stones and Paul McCartney, shares the details of how he developed the modern ID/graphics for an historical business in this article on their site – http://jjhapgood.com/general/legend-artist-behind-j-j-hapgood-logo-ties-sir-paul-mccartney-j-j-hapgood-run-deep/

October 22nd – 1) A group of photographs taken by photographer Michael Cooper of the Rolling Stones visiting sites including Stonehenge, Los Angeles and Joshua Tree are the basis of an exhibition titled “Courting The Stones: Photographs by Michael Cooper” which opened at London’s Proud Galleries Friday, October 16th and will be running there through November 22nd. Cooper – well known for his album cover photo work on both Their Satanic Majesties Request for the Stones and Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band for The Beatles – was part of the band’s “inner circle”, allowing him to catch band-members in a variety of intimate moments spent with friends (such as the late Gram Parsons), lovers and the people they’d meet in their travels around the world. Read more about the show in this nicely-illustrated article by Tim Chester on the Mashable site – http://mashable.com/2015/10/14/rolling-stones-exhibition-london/

2) The editorial staff at the World Religion News site has come up with a somewhat-unusual (and specific) “best of” album cover art list that looks back over the years for the Top 5 “Most Badass Christian Rock” covers. In the list, you’ll find bands that, in spite of their religion-focused lyrics (and band member lifestyles), these rockers, such as Trouble, Petra and Stryper, understood that hard rock fans had expectations of the inclusion of certain standard elements in their album art – powerful robots/slayers of evil, turbochargers and skulls (representing the evil about to be slayed) – and went to great lengths to provide them (in the most-respectable way possible, of course). Not much else info-wise was provided, but let the images speak for themselves – http://www.worldreligionnews.com/religion-news/christianity/christian-band-album-covers

3) The music industry awards for talent based in Canada’s provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador – known as the MusicNL Awards – were handed out this past week, with designer Jud Haynes given kudos for “Graphic Artist Of The Year” based on his cover for Chris Hadfield’s Space Sessions: Songs From A Tin Can (on Warner Music). The awards were distributed at a banquet in the ballroom at the Delta Hotel this past weekend, with the top award winner being Fortunate Ones who picked up awards for Group of the Year, Songwriter of the Year, Folk/Roots Recording of the Year and the top prize, the FACTOR Album of the Year. Designer Haynes has a long list of clients in the music business and, as a former musician, also books bands for local venues. More on the award show on the CBC web site – http://www.cbc.ca/m/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/fortunate-ones-the-once-kat-mclevey-big-winners-at-musicnl-awards-1.3277065
while you can learn more about the award-winning designer on his own site at http://www.judhaynes.com/

October 21st –  1) The video for Part 2 of Bob Egan’s presentation about “the making of” the album art for three quintessential records from Bob Dylan’s catalog – this one focused on Highway 61 Revisited – has been posted as part of an article on the Rolling Stone magazine site. Daniel Kramer’s well-known photo showing Dylan sitting on the steps of the apartment building that his manager (Albert Grossman) lived in – wearing a Triumph motorcycle t-shirt, with Ray Bans in hand – is one well-known by fans, so it is interesting to learn more about the location and the process by which Kramer coaxed this image from Dylan who, at least to me, didn’t seem all too happy about having his photo taken that day…http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/go-behind-the-scenes-of-bob-dylans-highway-61-revisited-album-cover-20151013

2) On the first day of November, the team at Art Vinyl in the U.K. launches its annual survey of the best in album cover art 2015. This year’s judging will be a bit different than what’s been done in the past in that they’re inviting the winners of the previous years’ voting (with voting having started back in 2005) to help select the 50 nominees whose works will also be put on display in five public venues (in Scotland, Italy, Norway, Hungary and England) for fans to review. Last year, over 16,000 participants cast their vote for their favorite covers, selecting the cover for #1-selling U.K. rock duo Royal Blood‘s eponymous record (featuring a Victorian etching-inspired work called “Falls” by artist Dan Hillier) as the best of 2014. To learn more about the upcoming survey and previous winners, please visit the Art Vinyl web site at http://www.artvinyl.com/best-art-vinyl/ Very eager to see who is nominated for this year’s survey – lots of good work done the past 12 months…

3) Original founder/lead singer for Oasis Liam Gallagher has a store in Manchester called Pretty Green that features his clothing line by the same name, and now he’s bringing fans/shoppers an opportunity to see an album cover photo show featuring works – including his many album cover shots for Oasis – by designer/photographer Brian Cannon. Brian’s also done covers for Ash, Suede, Super Furry Animals, The Verve and other well-known music industry clients, so it only makes sense that Gallagher would work with Cannon to shoot photos of his new clothing line as well. In this article by Emily Heward on the Manchester Evening News site, you’ll learn more about Cannon, his long-standing relationship with Oasis (a band not known for long-lasting relationships) and the stories behind some of the band’s best-known record covers – http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/whats-on/music-nightlife-news/iconic-oasis-britpop-album-covers-10260594

October 20th –  1) The producers for the documentary on the rise-and-fall of the Tower Records chain (titled All Things Must Pass) has just announced that the film will go into wider release over the next few weeks (even hitting here in Portland on December 4th!), so if you’d like to find out when and where it will be playing in your area, click on over to their site at http://www.towerrecordsmovie.com/theatrical-info/
The film premiered last week and has rec’d some very nice reviews. I’ll be wearing my bright yellow “Kickstarter Supporter” t-shirt when I see it – can’t wait. To see the trailer, visit http://www.towerrecordsmovie.com/trailer/
Anyone who has spent time digging through bins there should get a kick out of reliving those moments in this film.

2) The more-painterly endeavors of Seymour, Indiana’s best-known export – musician John Mellencamp – are now on display in a new art show hosted by the the ACA Galleries in NYC that opened Oct. 22nd. Running there through December 19th, “The Isolation of Mister” will show that, while the young artist’s career as a painter was side-tracked by his career as a R&RHOF-inducted rock star, his ability to express himself on canvas was never diminished. I also think you’ll enjoy reading Isaac Kaplan’s recent interview with Mellencamp on the Artsy.com site, where he talks about his craft, how a visit by Bob Dylan to his art studio kept his painting career front-and-center in his life and why he doesn’t make these colorful/insightful images to make YOU happy – https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-rock-and-roll-legend-john-mellencamp-talks-painting
To learn more about his new gallery show, click on over to the gallery’s site at http://www.acagalleries.com/artists/m/John-Mellencamp/

3) Artist Shepard Fairey has enjoyed success as an album cover artist (doing works for Tom Petty, The Black-Eyed Peas, Billy Idol and Led Zeppelin, among others), a poster artist (dozens of designs, including the acclaimed “Obama/Hope” design) and purveyor of graffiti and murals both legal and less-so, so capturing the essence of his work in a single book must have been quite the daunting task. However, as you’ll see when you thumb through his latest monotype – titled Covert To Overt – his motivations and influences over the years haven’t changed all that much, with a focus on “the subversive” and bringing meaningful ideas (AKA “propaganda”) to life through design. In this interview with Hugh Hart on the Fast Company/Create site, the pair talk about his career, his Obey Giant Industries business and how his “propaganda” is really there to start conversations on topics important to us all. http://www.fastcocreate.com/3051383/post-hope-poster-shepard-fairey-on-art-advertising-and-propaganda

October 19th – 1) While Nick Schager’s review on the Variety.com site of Laura Israel’s just-released documentary about famed art director and photographer Robert Frank (titled Don’t Blink) might not motivate you to rush out to see the film, it seems clear that the subject material – Frank’s impressive career and even more-interesting life – deserved the attention. Most of us will regard just two examples of his creative output – his book titled The Americans that documented his journey across mid-century America with photos that showed both the beauty and sadness of the country at the time, plus his cover for The Rolling Stones’ 1972 masterpiece Exile On Main Street – as a lifetime’s accomplishment, but he’s continued bringing us – on film, in pictures, etc. – fascinating and wonderful items that show the world – warts and all – as he sees it (and wants us to see it) – http://variety.com/2015/film/festivals/dont-blink-robert-frank-review-1201612629/

2) If you were reading magazines, buying posters to decorate your dorm room or listening to Duran Duran in the late 1970s-early 1980s, you undoubtedly were familiar with the works of artist Patrick Nagel. His Art Deco-influenced paintings of seductive women (those eyes!) were a staple illustration found in Playboy and Rolling Stone and in ads for Intel, IBM and Budweiser and, although he’s been dead for over 30 years, his artwork is still popular with poster collectors and merchandising companies world-wide, as is exemplified in this article by Hayley Helms for the Transworld Business site in which we learn more about the recent deal to produce limited-edition products signed by skateboard/clothing manufacturer HUF and Nagel’s estate. According to the nicely-illustrated article, “HUF proudly partners with Patrick Nagel and his estate to release a collection of items highlighting the artist’s work and legacy. Consisting of reversible satin bomber jackets, fleece hoodies, skateboard decks, 6-panel hats, a blanket, pin set and tees, the HUF x Nagel Collaboration retails from $12-$190. More via the link at http://business.transworld.net/news/huf-and-patrick-nagel-join-forces-for-limited-edition-collaboration/

3) Yes, you heard it right – The Zombies have a new album out, and it features artwork by Terry Quirk, the artist responsible for the very-psychedelic designs featured on the band’s seminal 1968 release Odessey & Oracle. The new record, titled Still Got That Hunger, brings together original members Rod Argent and Colin Bunstone and the song-writing duo will re-team with original Zombies Chris White (who introduced Quirk to the band) and Hugh Grundy to perform Odessey & Oracle in its entirety on tour soon. We’re assuming that the band kept the title for the new record simple so as to avoid any further spelling mistakes going forward…Read more about the band and their ongoing efforts in Jordan Runtagh’s interview article on the VH-1 site via the link – http://www.vh1.com/news/212077/the-zombies-still-got-that-hunger-interview/

October 16th – 1) The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, OH recently launched an exhibit sure to delight fans of Graham Nash and the whole West Coast music-making scene. Titled “Graham Nash: Touching The Flame”, is a multi-media extravaganza with a twist – it’s focus is on all of the things (people, scenes, world politics, etc.) that helped shape Graham’s life and creative output, both as a musician and as an accomplished photographer (and inventor of advanced digital photo printing processes). In addition to photos, memorabilia and the like (per the show’s press kit – it will “showcase his interests in photography, collecting and other artistic endeavors. Among the items that will be featured in the exhibit are some rare pieces of Buddy Holly memorabilia and photos that Graham has collected” – there are several interactive elements to the show, including a station where you can sing harmonies with Mr. Nash (if only!). Read more about the exhibit and watch a video introduction hosted by Nash via the link – http://rockhall.com/exhibits/graham-nash-touching-the-flame-exhibit-rock-hall/

2) The folks at L-13 Gallery in the U.K., as part of a display at the Multiplied Contemporary Art Editions show hosted by Christie’s in South Kensington this weekend, are releasing a new set of prints that fans of iconic punk imagery are going to want to look at. Famed designer Jamie Reid has produced what he calls a “Republic Box Set” consisting of “documentary materials relating to the God Save the Queen artworks, all sourced from original materials held in the Jamie Reid Archive.” The set will be released in a signed and numbered edition of 113 (with 13 APs) boxes, each containing 11 prints (approx. 16.5″ x 11.8″) on 310 gsm photo gloss paper, with each one numbered and stamped on the back and housed in a silver clam-shell box with debossed covers. The publishers are so thoughtful that they’re also throwing in a set of black latex gloves for handling! The set is published by John Marchant Gallery in association with the L-13 Light Industrial Workshop. There was a limited-time special offer for the duration of the art fair: £195 (approx. $300, plus shipping), with the price going up on Monday the 19th to £250 (about $385, plus shipping). Details are available on the L-13 site – http://www.l-13.org/acatalog/L-13_Latest_Works.html

3) Grammy-winning album cover designer Fritz Klaetke (principal at Boston’s Visual Dialogue design firm) has used whatever spare time he could take from an already-busy schedule to work with his team to create a new store (currently a “pop-up”) that has called on all of their talents – “we created the concept, developed the branding, designed the merchandise, sourced local makers, curated the vintage items, developed the website, constructed the store, etc., etc…all on top of our “day jobs” running Visual Dialogue” – to offer customers a wide range of products made by local designers and artisans. Called “1630” (the year the city was founded), the products are “a treasure trove of antiques and collectibles. We’ve scoured the best vintage fairs and markets to bring you curated, one-of-a-kind home goods, jewelry, and artwork. Each of these unique objects tells a story–so you can bring a piece of history home”…Still working for clients in the music business, the team also just created the Lead Belly box set for their client Smithsonian Folkways. Best of luck, Fritz! To learn more about this latest effort, please visit http://1630boston.com/#proprietors

October 15th – 1) I’m not sure whether it is because I spent a number of years creating programming for young people or, more likely, I’m still a juvenile at heart, but I sure love them Minions…Because of happiness these pill-shaped characters bring to me every time I see them, I was even more happy to see them in this new application – featured characters in a series of heavy metal album cover recreations! If you click on over to Greg Kennelty’s article on the Metal Injection site, you’ll learn more about a DeviantArt page hosted by the “Croatian Crusader” where you’ll find his collection of covers for his imaginary “Iron Minion” band based on the well-known designs of seminal metal band Iron Maiden.
Number Of The Beast made me laugh out loud – what’s your favorite? http://www.metalinjection.net/around-the-interwebs/only-a-matter-of-time-iron-maiden-minions-mashed-up-album-covers
I can only assume that, somewhere on the interwebs, there’s a site where you’ll find famous punk covers featuring the Seven Dwarfs.

2) Speaking of Belles – there was a special presentation the week of October 20th at Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall (in Ojai, CA.) done as part of the monthly meeting of the Ojai Photo Club featuring musician and photographer Chris Jensen who, according to this article by Myrna on the Ventura County Star site, has produced portraits of everyone from “Belles and Brawn to Rockers and Troubadors”. Originally a drummer in local bands, Jensen went back to school in the mid-70s to earn his degree in graphic design and then, in the late-70s, opened a design/photography studio in Salt Lake City, soon taking on projects for a wide range of local clients. News of his talents spread, landing him gigs with subjects including Ozzy Osbourne and Rod Stewart and, ultimately, moving to the LA area (actually, Ventura) to be closer to his client base. Jensen will be providing a retrospective of his career, so click on over to http://www.vcstar.com/ugc/yournews/from-belles-and-brawn-to-rockers-and-troubadors-chris-jensen-talks-about-portriture-at-ojai-photo-club_188823 to get the details.

3) Film-maker/obsessive record collector Eilon Paz has worked for the past several years on digging into the details of what makes people put together large collections of records/CDs and, as the result of that effort, he’s just released a new book titled Dust & Grooves: Adventures in Record Collecting, compiled by Paz and edited by Sheila Burgel, who’s own huge collection was also featured in the book. Writers Oscar Garza and Cameron Kell, writing for The Frame site, interviewed the two about their new tome and learned quite a lot about what motivates folks to invest the time, money and sagging floors in order to have their music close at hand. You’ll also be able to hear the interview via the audio file posted on the site – http://www.scpr.org/programs/the-frame/2015/10/06/44702/dust-grooves-one-on-one-with-the-world-s-most-obse/ 
One look at Questlove sitting amongst his collection explains quite a bit, don’t you think (“happy as a ____ in ____” – you fill in the blanks).

October 14th – 1) Need to clarify and update my posting yesterday on the death of John Berg – John died this past Sunday due to complications from pneumonia. Since then, I’ve received a number of notes from people that either/both worked with him and/or were mentored by him that expressed their sorrow about his passing and emphasized the long-term impact he had on their lives and careers.

With his permission and to exemplify the sense of loss being felt in the industry, I want to share a brief statement that accomplished designer Ron Coro sent me, along with a photo from back “in the glory days” – “The memories of working with John from 1966 on, are priceless for all of us album package designers that worked on the 10th floor at CBS Records in NYC at “Black Rock” building, as we called it, in the mid sixties…..I was hired by John right before I even graduated from The School of Visual Arts and was recommended to John Berg by Milton Glaser, my graphic design instructor…What a time it was, and it will never be repeated.”

Photo by David Gahr, used with permission from Ron Coro.

Photo by David Gahr, used with permission from Ron Coro.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“This photo (above) was taken in 1971 by David Gahr on the 10th floor of the CBS Building in John Bergs office. This is a year before I was promoted to Art Director, CBS Records, West Coast. Left to right: Ron Coro, John Berg and Richard Mantel…..”
Thanks for sharing this, Ron…

2) Here are reminders for two events that took place this week featuring two accomplished music industry image-makers:

a) On Thursday, Oct. 15th at Revolution Hall in Portland, OR, designer Paula Scher presented a talk sponsored by AIGA Portland titled “Identity Design Today… and Why the Blogosphere Should Shut Up!” (I’ll try not to take offense). According to the AIGA’s site, Ms. Scher “will share her views on the current state of design and social media. Sure to be engaging and thought-provoking, Scher’s talk is a rare opportunity to see one of America’s leading designers in a bold, no holds barred talk.” A principal at leading NYC design firm Pentagram, Scher’s been responsible for hundreds of record cover since she began her career at Atlantic Records in the 1970s, so if you’re wanting to hear more from one of the greats, here’s your chance – http://aigaportland.org/aiga_event/paula-scher/

b) Also that Thursday, photographer Jay Blakesberg was on hand at the Mr. Musichead Gallery in Los Angeles to launch a showing of his work, lead a lecture and present his latest book project titled Hippie Chick: A Tale Of Love, Devotion & Surrender. The lecture, titled “Chasing The Light: The Rock & Roll Photography of Jay Blakesberg” will include stories about his 35+ year career covering the Grateful Dead and a host of other rock music luminaries. He was on hand to sign copies of his new book as well, so if you’d like to learn from one of the music industry’s most-accomplished shooters, visit the following link – http://mrmusichead.com/event-book-signing-lecture-with-jay-blakesberg/

October 13th – 1) It is with great sadness that I must note the passing of one of the world’s most-prolific album cover art directors, former Columbia Records cover guru John Berg. He was 83 and had been suffering with Parkinson’s disease, according to his wife and creative partner, Durell Godfrey. Berg’s portfolio includes credits for over 5,000 (!!) covers, including memorable images for Barbra Streisand (Barbra Streisand Album), Bob Dylan (Blonde On Blonde and Greatest Hits), Jeff Beck (Blow By Blow), Bruce Springsteen (Greetings From Asbury Park and Born To Run) and 14 covers for Chicago (including the most-delicious one – Chicago X – done in chocolate!).
What was truly impressive about Berg’s work was his ability to find and collaborate with the most-talented photographers, designers and illustrators available, bringing the talents of people including Richard Avedon, Paul Davis, Milton Glaser, Jerry Schatzberg and many others to projects for hundreds of clients over the years.
Read more about John and his contribution to great rock imagery in Jon Blistein‘s article on the Rolling Stone magazine site – http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/john-berg-album-art-director-for-springsteen-dylan-dead-at-83-20151013
My condolences to his family and friends – his efforts will not be forgotten.

2) There was an exhibition that ran through October 20th at the Kendal Museum (part of Kendal College) in Kendal, Cumbria, England that will be of interest to fans of both album cover art and comic books. Curated by artist Sean Phillips in anticipation of the upcoming Lakes Comic Book Festival, there are 60 covers on display featuring the work of well-known album cover artists including Richard Corben (Bat Out Of Hell for Meat Loaf), Guy Peellaert (Diamond Dogs for David Bowie), Jamie Hewlett (Gorillaz), Robert Crumb (Cheap Thrills for Big Brother & The Holding Company) and many others (60 artists in total). According to Festival Director Julie Tait, “Our exhibitions program is intended to appeal to a broad range of tastes and interests and to demonstrate that there is more to comic artists and art than meets the eye,” Find out more about the exhibition on the museum’s site at http://www.kendalmuseum.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions-and-events/phonographic-exhibition-part-of-the-comic-art-festival

3) Not sure exactly why I wouldn’t want to make Grace Jones mad at me (other than the feeling that I think she could snuff me out rather quickly), but fear of her wrath seemingly did not deter self-proclaimed musical genius Kanye West from “honoring” Ms. Jones’ earlier contributions to album cover imagery by recreating them – without her approval – in his own promotional imagery (featuring his then-girlfriend Amber) when he launched his web site several years ago. This did not escape Grace’s keen eye and, in Paper Magazine‘s Nowstalgia issue, she minces no words – “‘Kanye has been ripping off stuff from me and Jean-Paul Goude for a long time, so it was no surprise to me”.
You might recall that photographer Goude did work with the new Mrs. West a couple of years ago, recreating another famous image of his – of a model balancing a champagne glass on her rather-curvaceous posterior – substituting in Kim’s ledge-like butt, with the resulting photo breaking the Internet for a couple of days…More on this in Eric Tempesta’s article on The Daily Mail (UK) web site at http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3260820/Supermodel-Grace-Jones-slams-Kanye-West-ripping-images-website-weighs-Kim-Kardashian-s-internet-breaking-Paper-magazine-cover.html

October 12th – 1) Over on the East Coast Radio site (East Coast of South Africa, that is), writer Bongani Mtolo presents what is called “The Hardest Album Cover Quiz You’ll Ever Take”. You’re presented with 10 partial album cover images and have to guess (multiple choice) which records they’re from. I got 9 out of 10 (missed #2 and lucked out on #3) and, quite honestly, I think that I’ve seen/taken “harder” quizzes on the subject in the past, but I’d like to hear how you all do – http://www.ecr.co.za/shows/bongani-mtolo-1/hardest-album-cover-quiz-youll-ever-take/

2) Famed Pop Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat had his own record label 30+ years ago (Tartown Records) and released a single on vinyl by Rammellzee and K-Rob called “Beat Bop” that featured a cover design by Basquiat. Quite rare (you can, on occasion, find original copies for $1K or more), the design is now featured on a fully-licensed, limited-edition (1000) record box that, I’m assuming, will be a “must-own” collectible for DJs world-wide.
The record’s artwork is featured on all of the boxes surfaces, both inside and outside, and the box holds 50 discs, with the price for this “box set” (as they call it) being a quite-reasonable $75, while supplies last. You can read about it in David Ireland’s article on Magnetic Magazine –
http://www.magneticmag.com/2015/10/the-jean-michel-basquiat-record-box-pure-dope-for-vinyl-djs-and-collectors/ 
and buy one for yourself (or as a gift) directly from the Get On Down store (with shipping starting later this month) – http://getondown.com/album.php?id=18014

October 9th – Two award show nomination summaries and a look at album art created by musicians:

1) The nominees for “Best Recording Package” for this year’s Latin Grammy Awards have been posted, and they are:

Blam! Blam! – on Coqueiro Verde Records
Julia Rocha, art director (Jonas Sá)

Este Instante – on Aluna Music
Natalia Ayala, Carlos Dussan Gómez & Juliana Jaramillo, art directors (Marta Gómez)

Noel Rosa, Preto E Branco – on Tenda Da Raposa
Anna Amendola, art director (Valéria Lobão)

Tajo Abierto – on Frantastic Records
Pablo González & Francisca Valenzuela, art directors (Francisca Valenzuela)

Veinte Años El Grito Después – on Universal Music Group/EMI
Laura Varsky, art director (Catupecu Machu)

The winners will be announced on November 19th – congratulations to all of the nominees!
http://www.latingrammy.com/en/nominees?genre=55

2) The Australian record industry announced the winner in the “Best Cover Art” category for the annual ARIA Awards. The technical award categories are awarded prior to the televised show on November 26th that will feature the principal award categories.

This year’s winner is Courtney Barnett for Courtney Barnett – Sometimes I Sit And Think, And Sometimes I Just Sit (Milk! Records / Remote Control)

Ms. Barnett’s album, which went #10 on the Billboard Album Charts and #13 on the UK Album Charts, also received nominations in the following categories: Album Of The Year, Best Female Artist, Best Independent Release, Best Rock Album, Breakthrough Artist and the publicly voted categories for Best Australian Live Act and Best Video for the song, ‘Pedestrian At Best’ which was directed by Charlie Ford.

Other nominees in the Cover Art category included Daniel Johns, Aref and Peter Salmon-Lomas for Daniel Johns – Talk (Eleven / EMI); Timothy Lovett for Flight Facilities – Down To Earth (Future Classic); Bjenny Montero for Pond – Man It Feels Like Space Again (EMI) and Nathan Johnson for Gang of Youths – The Positions (Verge / Sony Music Entertainment Australia)

Get all of the details at http://www.ariaawards.com.au/News/2015/2015-ARIA-Awards-Connected-By-Telstra-Nominated-ar

3) Writing for the Gigwise site, Alexandra Pollard has put together a nice article that serves to show just how unfair life can be sometimes, with all of the talent genes installed into a small group of lucky recipients. It’s a review of album covers that were created by musicians, with the list of 10 featured in the article including cover images created by acts including Muse, The Stone Roses, Joni Mitchell, Cat Stevens (AKA Yusuf), John Lennon and several others. With a large percentage of musicians having gone to “art school” (although, some admit to going “just for the chicks”), it seems clear that they often times enjoy showing off their creative “chops” in other aspects of the recorded music business (and making Art Directors quite happy sometimes, I’m told)…http://www.gigwise.com/photos/103068/album-artwork-drawn-and-designed-by-bands-and-musicians-muse-joni

BONUS BIRTHDAY CONTENT – Very happy to be able to point you to a nice article on the Biography.com site written by a former FUSE TV colleague of mine – Laurie Ulster – that talks about the many creative inspirations and outlets for the late, great John Lennon, who would have been 75 years old yesterday had not some idiot with a gun (are you detecting a pattern, perhaps?) taken his life 35 years ago… Laurie also notes that there is a gallery show featuring Lennon’s artwork running currently (through the end of the month) at the AFA Gallery down on Greene Street in NYC where you can see several dozen examples of his talent with pen and ink (and watercolor) on paper. Nice article, Laurie! – http://www.biography.com/news/john-lennon-biography-facts-75th-birthday

October 8th – 1) New and classic works by master of the collage/album cover art great Winston Smith are featured alongside several other local artists in a new show that opened October 8th at the Robert Berman Gallery in San Francisco. “Paper Cuts” will treat collectors/visitors with a selection of works that, according to the gallery’s press release, will show “how paper can take on a strength and beauty in its abstract and narrative forms. In this exhibition, we observe how such a simple medium can be transformed into diverse ranges of forms.” Smith – well known for his work for Green Day, The Dead Kennedys and others – will be showing several of his hand-cut and often humorous masterpieces and, by the looks of the other works to be shown by the other participants, the entire show looks as though it will appeal to all of our creative instincts – more via the link at http://e6gallerysf.com/future

2) I continue to be impressed with the works of album cover artists all over the world, with the Internet bringing us the ability to see the results of cover art projects by designers (and for musical acts) that most of us weren’t aware of. One such example is the works that graphic designer Supichan Rojvanich has done for a number of top recording acts in Thailand. As you’ll read in the article by writer Pimchanok Phungbun Na Ayudhya (wow!) on the Bangkok Post web site, Thai acts have not – until recently – spent a great deal of energy/resources to create memorable album cover visuals, but with Rojvanich and others leading the way, clients from all aspects of the local music business – from rock and dance bands to a Buddhist prayer group – are now getting their first taste of successful “branding” (I can only imagine how decadent the record release parties must be) –
http://www.bangkokpost.com/lifestyle/music/716032/it-more-than-an-album-cover

3) With a party at the MAMA Gallery in Los Angeles recently, rap artist Rihanna showed fans and the media some of the interesting artwork by artist Roy Nachum that will be used to package her upcoming album, titled Anti. Based on the designs that were shown, which feature (according to Frazier Tharpe, reporting for the Complex/Style site) “a young girl with a crown superimposed over her face and poetry composed in braille (by poet Chloe Mitchell) covering the canvas…it was explained that it’s inspired by Rih’s first day of daycare.” Nachum seems to have a lot of fans in the music world – there’s a painting of his titled “The Clown” hanging in Jay-Z’s NYC office – and Tharpe helps us get to know the Jerusalem-born artist a bit better in the rest of his article, reachable via this link – http://www.complex.com/style/2015/10/roy-nachum-rihanna-album-cover-artist

October 8th, part 2 – 1) “Pop Spots” author/locator of all things album cover Bob Egan recently hosted a video for Rolling Stone Magazine that featured photographer Daniel Kramer giving us a look into “the making of” the iconic shot featured on the cover of Bob Dylan’s Bringing It All Back Home LP. The story helps to provide a lead-in to the release of the upcoming compilation, The Cutting Edge 1965–1966: The Bootleg Series Vol. 12, which contains session recordings from the album. There will be two more similar videos that give album art/”making of” back-stories for two other Dylan recordings from the same time period – Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde On Blonde – so stay tuned for more opportunities to get a peek behind the scenes during the production of some of Dylan’s most-compelling records – http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/see-how-bob-dylans-iconic-bringing-it-all-back-home-cover-was-made-20150929

2) The work of long-time (former) Factory Records album art guru Peter Saville can be found on the most-recent release by seminal synth-rock band New Order. The band’s ninth studio record – titled Music Complete – is reviewed by Anwen Crawford in the “Pop Music” section of the 10/5 issue of New Yorker magazine. According to Crawford, “Saville’s designs for the band, using grids, color blocks, and stock photos, resemble advertising for a company that does not exist. Just as the members of New Order have tended to be subsumed by the group as a whole, the visual style creates a dislocation between the band and its audience.”
Someday, I’ll try and figure out just what “critic-speak” means in layman’s terms, but it is comforting to know that there is still an appreciation for the value of long-standing relationships between designers and their music-industry clients – http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/10/05/late-style

3) What starts out as a riff by a writer about a musical act’s rather-mundane approach to album cover art (embellishing a stock photo with some bling) turns in to a rather-detailed lament about how album art used to be an essential element in building bridges between musical acts and their fans and, at least for me, it’s refreshing to hear this from writers covering today’s “money/brand is everything” music business. While I don’t know anything about the author (“Yoh”, AKA Yotoshop AKA @Yoh31), I would invite all you (us) old-timers to read his/her article on the Complex Music/DJ Booth site and then share your own thoughts on the subject – http://www.djbooth.net/index/news/entry/2015-09-30-album-art-meme
Also – can someone help with a more-detailed definition of the word “meme” than I seem to be able to find?

October 7th – 1) Happy to announce the launch of a new retail site by award-winning (inc. 3 Grammy Awards) album cover designer Kosh, the guy responsible for at least ONE BILLION of your favorite album cover images (OK, I may have exaggerated a bit, but it’s a LOT of them). What’s even more impressive about the designer’s latest efforts is that they include a number of impressive re-interpretations and “mash-ups” of some of his better-known covers. I’m particularly taken by one titled Abbey Hotel, a work that combines aspects of both The Eagles’ Hotel California with The Beatles’ Abbey Road (in real life, traffic would have to stop until the Fab Four reached the other side of the cross-walk).
The new line of limited-edition prints were premiered at a recent display at the Delicious Vinyl Records store in Los Angeles, with Kosh’s designs for clients including Linda Ronstadt, ELO, John Lennon, Humble Pie, The Who and others nicely represented. If you are a fan of great album packaging, be sure to click on over to the new site and take a tour – http://www.koshdesign.com/ 
Via this link, you’ll also find several video interviews with the man behind the magic – http://www.koshdesign.com/about

2) Recently, in a special article on “The Cut” section of the New York Magazine site, photographer/lover-of-life Eve Babitz (the talent behind well-regarded photographs for Buffalo Springfield, Black Oak Arkansas and Linda Ronstadt’s Heart Like A Wheel) gets a chance to share some of her early escapades as “A 70s It Girl”, friend and lover to some of the Los Angeles entertainment scenes most-important people (including Jim Morrison of The Doors). Some of you will recall Julian Wasser’s startling (at the time – 1963) photo of a naked Ms. Babitz sitting across from Marcel Duchamp while playing a game of chess in a gallery of the Pasadena Art Museum, but it was her talents as writer and photographer that helped her produce articles about her life and “the scene” that have continued to impress readers with their ability to bring us closer to a sphere of personalities that were beyond our purview… http://nymag.com/thecut/2015/09/sex-life-of-a-70s-it-girl.html

October 5th – 1) Happy to report on this nice review in the New York Times of the NYC premiere of Roddy Bogawa’s film about famed album cover design guru Storm Thorgerson. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/02/movies/review-taken-by-storm-about-the-mind-behind-a-design.html
You might recall my interview a few years back with Roddy (in 2 parts) while he was in the midst of making this film, during which he spoke about Storm & his partners at the design firm Hipgnosis, as well as his take on a wide range of music/art topics, so it was great to read about both the warm reception his film is getting and why Taken By Storm serves to remind both music/art fans and creators of album cover imagery that creativity is the expression of great ideas and not simply the application of algorithms and filters. I’d invite you to all to read the initial interview with this talented film-maker via the link – http://rockpopgallery.typepad.com/rockpop_gallery_news/2011/06/interview-with-roddy-bogawa-on-the-documentary-film-taken-by-storm.html

2) Baltimore, MD is the home of an intriguing museum – the American Visionary Art Museum, or AVAM – dedicated to the presentation of art created by self-taught individuals ” whose works arise from an innate personal vision that revels foremost in the creative act itself”. They’ve been at this for 20 years now and, as part of their anniversary celebration (titled “The Big Hope Show”), they’re presenting the works of psychedelic rock bandleader Wayne Coyne (of The Flaming Lips), whose newest installation, titled “Kings Mouth”, is Coyne’s ultimate expression of a near-death experience he suffered while working as a cashier at a fast food restaurant years ago. Coyne also created the cover art for the band’s 2014 Beatles tribute record With A Little Help From My Fwends, and you can read more about this show (which is running until next September) and some of the other participating artists on the museum’s promo page at –
http://www.avam.org/exhibitions/big-hope-show.shtml

3) Designer Leif Podhasky has been quite busy lately, creating intriguing cover art designs for clients including Tame Impala, The Vines, Kells, Of Monsters & Men and others, but outside the music business, he’s hooked up with top Scotch Whisky distillery Ballantine’s to create a series of limited-edition bottles that “will be a must have for whisky and art connoisseurs alike,” according to Peter Moore, global brand director of Ballantine’s. The three special products will begin shipping world-wide later this month, but art fans can sign up now for a chance to win a set of limited-edition prints of the trio of designs featured on the packaging via a contest run by the Music-News.com site – http://www.music-news.com/competition/4534/Win-a-set-of-three-framed-artworks-from-Ballantine-s-Artist-Series Writing for The Spirits Business web site, Amy Hopkins gives us more of the details behind the artist and his inspirations for these colorful designs – http://www.thespiritsbusiness.com/2015/09/ballantines-unveils-artist-series-whisky-bottles/

That’s all for now – look for updates every week day on our news feed –https://www.facebook.com/AlbumCoverHallOfFame – we’ll be back early next month with another summary for you.

Best Art Vinyl 2012 Award Winners Announcement

THE TEMPER TRAP, KEANE AND MUSE WIN
THE BEST ART VINYL 2012 AWARDS FOR
ALBUM COVER DESIGN

Best Art Vinyl, 2012, winner,

Best Art Vinyl 2012 Winning Designs

 

 

 

 

 

January 10, 2013: The Temper Trap’s self-titled LP, Keane’s Strangeland  and The 2nd Law by Muse won the top three spots in this year’s “Best Art Vinyl 2012″ awards polling.  Gallerist/manufacturer Art Vinyl, together with Front Room at St Martin’s Lane, London (where an ongoing exhibition of the winning designs, along with those by the other nominees, continues through January 27th), made this announcement today after tallying more than 12,000 votes from fans of art, photography and graphic design relating to modern music culture.

The 2012 winners display a diverse mix of art and design, beginning with The Temper Trap’s strikingly beautiful photographic cover, designed by Alberto Seveso and the London-based Boat Studio. Strangeland also features a quietly beautiful photograph by Alex Lake, whilst the stunning design of The 2nd Law depicts a captivating full colour image of the connections in a human brain, courtesy of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging at UCLA. According to Best Art Vinyl founder Andrew Heeps, “For eight years now, Art Vinyl have championed the diverse, the vibrant and the different creative styles that still exist in record cover art and design. This year we feel we have really achieved our aim and brought the public’s attention to some amazing sleeve designs, and, notably, some creative photography with this year’s winner.”

Now in its 8th year, this unique award is now an important date in the music industry calendar and compiles the global opinion on art and design for each year.  In January 2013, the winners of the Best Art Vinyl 2012 award will be featured in exhibitions in the United Kingdom, Europe and Australia as well as on www.artvinyl.com. All of the designs will be displayed in the unique Art Vinyl Play & Display Flip Frame which allow instant access to the music and inner sleeve designs.

Best Art Vinyl 2012 Top 10 Vote-getters:

1. The Temper Trap – The Temper Trap
2. Keane – Strangeland
3. Muse – The 2nd Law
4. Mark Lanegan Band – Blues Funeral
5. White Lung – Sorry
6. Enter Shikari – A Flash Flood of Colour
7. Saint Etienne – Words and Music
8. Richard Hawley – Standing at the Sky’s Edge
9. Jack White – Blunderbuss
10. The Hives – Lex Hives

Information on Top 3 Winners:

1st Place
Artist: The Temper Trap
Title: The Temper Trap
Record Label: Infectious Music
Designer: Photography and Artwork by Alberto Seveso, Design and Art Direction by Boat Studios
http://burdu976.com/
http://www.boat-studio.com/

2nd Place
Artist: Keane
Title: Strangeland
Record Label: Island
Designer: Photography by Alex Lake. Design and Art Direction by Tourist
http://alexlakephotography.com/
http://www.wearetourist.com/

3rd Place
Artist: Muse
Title: The 2nd Law
Record Label: Helium 3 (Warner Bros)
Designer: Neuro Images supplied courtesy of the Human Connectome Project, Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, UCLA. Band Photography by Travis Shinn
http://www.loni.ucla.edu/

This year’s winners provide some insight regarding their award-winning designs:

– Comments from 1st Place-winning designer Davey Spens at Boat Studio regarding The Temper Trap:

“Boat Studio worked with The Temper Trap to create an identity for their self-titled second album. We wanted to give the platinum-selling Australian band something more than a smart album cover – a visual identity that could run throughout the album campaign, visuals you could remove their logo from and it would still be unmistakably theirs.

Boat Studio collaborated with Italian artist Alberto Seveso to create the identity. Working with acrylic ink in water, he photographed a suite of images in a bold primary palette to run across single and album artwork. The campaign was created in two locations, from Alberto’s studio in Sicily and ours in London, where we created moving visuals.

The launch campaign surrounding the album had a heavy digital focus, so as important as creating static visuals; we wanted to bring the artwork to life in film. Shooting the ink unfolding in water in high definition we created a series of moving images that were eventually employed in the iTunes LP as the first ever moving lyrics booklet, and also formed a simple, hypnotic video for a leaked taster song from the album – Rabbit Hole, which clocked up over 800k hits on YouTube. Boat Studio creative-directed the album launch, and handled the promo, single and album packaging formats for the band, from 7-inch picture disks and Deluxe Casebound Albums to the gorgeous triple gatefold, double coloured vinyl LP.”

– Comments from Arthur W. Toga at the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, UCLA School of Medicine, regarding the imagery used on the cover of 3rd-Place winner The 2nd Law by Muse:

“The image is a rendering that depicts the connections in a human brain, the wiring diagram, if you will.  These images are made from data collected on a MRI machine and are part of a large project to map the connections in humans. I can only say that the distance between art and science is often very small indeed and that the beauty and wonder of the human brain and its inner workings inspires all of us that work to discover it.”

A quote from Andy Linehan, Curator of Popular Music at the British Library:

“I receive almost daily deliveries from record companies for our collection and recent years have seen a marked increase in the number of releases on vinyl by both major and independent record labels. In addition to the quality of sound, one of the major attractions of the vinyl LP is the sleeve art and it is great to see this being recognised and celebrated in this way.”

Best Art Vinyl 2012 Gallery Exhibition Information:

ART VINYL UK EXHIBITION

Front Room at St Martin’s Lane
45 St Martin’s Lane
London
WC2N 4HX
Tel: +44 (0)114 236 4355
Exhibition dates: 8th November 8, 2012 – January 27, 2013
http://www.stmartinslane.com/en-us/#/home

For information on St Martin’s Lane contact:
Kate Bell – kate.bell@purplepr.com + 44 (0) 207 434 7002
Eden Yates – eden@purplepr.com +44 (0) 207 434 7067

ART VINYL INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITIONS –

Mag Nation
155 King St
Newtown, Sydney
NSW 2042
Australia
Tel: 02 9516 0202

Exhibition dates: November 22nd 2012 – January 31st 2013
http://www.magnation.com

ONO ARTE CONTEMPORANEA
Via Santa Margherita, 10
40123 Bologna, Italy
Tel: 0039 051 6569105

Exhibition dates: December 6, 2012 – January 28, 2013
http://www.onoarte.com/html/gallery.html

Marten Art Vinyl Gallery
Chalmersgatan 24
411 35 Gothenburg, Sweden

Exhibition dates: November 18, 2012 – January 15, 2013
Tel: 0046 3120 7200
http://www.artvinyl.se

For more information on the Best Art Vinyl competition, please visit:
http://www.bestartvinyl.com/